Course Title: Aquatic and Soil Chemistry: Natural Processes

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Aquatic and Soil Chemistry: Natural Processes

Credit Points: 12.00

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

CHEM1058

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

CHEM1058

City Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017,
Sem 1 2019,
Sem 1 2020,
Sem 1 2021

Course Coordinator: Dr Andrew Hung

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 1974

Course Coordinator Email: andrew.hung@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: Room 003.02.024 City Campus

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment, by email


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

There are no prerequisites for this subject.

This is an intermediate level undergraduate chemistry course. To complete this course successfully, you should have a background in university-level theoretical and practical chemistry, and have completed at least one year of study in university chemistry.  


Course Description

This course aims to help you develop further understanding of the fundamental chemical and physical processes occurring in aquatic and soil environments, and of the chemistry and physicochemical processes underlying anthropogenic impacts on these environments. 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) for: 

BP192 Bachelor of Environmental Science and; 

the environmental science side of the following double degrees: 

BP161 Bachelor of Environmental Science / Bachelor of Business (Management); 

BH096 Bachelor of Environmental Science / B Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours) and; 

BP193 Bachelor of Environmental Science / Bachelor of Environment and Society: 

 

This course contributes to the B. Science Program Learning Outcomes: 

 PLO-2 Scientific knowledge 

  • PLO-2.1 You will have exhibited depth and breadth of chemistry knowledge by demonstrating a knowledge of, and applying the principles and concepts of chemistry

PLO-3 Inquiry, Problem Solving and Critical Thinking 

  • PLO-3.1 You will be able to investigate and solve qualitative and quantitative problems in the chemical sciences, both individually and in teams, by synthesising and evaluating information from a range of sources, including traditional and emerging information technologies and methods 
  • PLO-3.2 You will be able to formulate hypotheses, proposals and predictions and design and undertake experiments and projects in a safe and responsible manner.

PLO-4 Communication 

  • PLO-4.1 You will be able to communicate chemical knowledge by presenting information, articulate arguments and conclusions, in a variety of modes, to diverse audiences, and for a range of purposes

PLO-5 Personal and professional responsibility 

  • PLO-5.4 You will develop an ability to work collaboratively 


On successful completion of this course you should be able to: 

  1. Demonstrate broad and coherent knowledge of aquatic chemistry, soil chemistry, and physical chemistry concepts applied to understanding processes in natural environments;
  2. Gather, synthesize and critically evaluate information from a range of sources;
  3. Collect, record, interpret and draw conclusions from scientific data;
  4. Communicate results, information or arguments in aquatic and soil chemistry, and physical chemistry concepts applied to understanding processes in natural environments, effectively in written mode;
  5. Perform practical and other tasks effectively, responsibly, ethically and safely in individual contexts and work collaboratively in team contexts. 

 


Overview of Learning Activities

This is a theory and laboratory based course. 

The learning activities included in this course are: 

  • Pre-recorded lectures and lectorials where syllabus material will be presented and explained, and the subject will be illustrated with practical examples; 
  • Revision and tutorial questions as well as assignments to develop deeper understanding of lecture materials. Providing opportunities to use a wide range of information sources and for feedback on student progress and understanding; 
  • Laboratory analyses of environmental water and soil samples, including both wet-lab approaches as well as using analytical instrumentation. Lab reports on the results from these practical activities will help develop communication skills. 
  • Private study (self-directed learning), working through the course as presented either in classes or on-line, as well as learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and numerical problems. 


Overview of Learning Resources

Lecture notes and presentations for the course will be available through CANVAS as well as course information and other learning materials.  

There are no recommended textbooks for this course, however, lists of relevant reference texts, resources in the library and freely accessible internet sites will be provided. Details of the key recommended reference sources for this course are provided in part B of the course guide. 


Overview of Assessment

Note that:  

The Practical assessments are a hurdle for this course, meaning that you must achieve more than 50% on the Practical component in order to pass the course. The skills learned in Practical are essential to ensure that you can operate safely as a professional.  

 

Assessment Task 1: Laboratory reports  

Weighting: 15% 

This assessment task supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 

  

Assessment Task 2: In-semester assignments  

Weighting: 50% total 

This assessment task supports CLOs: 1 and 4 

  

Assessment Task 3: Final authentic assessment 

Weighting: 35% 

This assessment task supports CLOs: 1 and 4