Course Title: Product Development

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Product Development

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ONPS1113

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012

ONPS2386

City Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012

ONPS2496

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2016

ONPS2496

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

ONPS2497

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2016

ONPS2497

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Professor Stefan Kasapis

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 5244

Course Coordinator Email: stefan.kasapis@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

This is a final year course in the undergraduate Food Technology and Nutrition degrees. You should have completed the first four semesters of your degree or equivalent learning.


Course Description

The overall aim of this course is to introduce you to the language and principles of contemporary product development in model systems and industrial applications.

In doing so, it will emphasize the study of the techno- and bio-functionality of key ingredients used in product development specifically in relation to the molecular structure of these key components.

Based on this, you will gain a thorough understanding of the importance of structure-function relationships in the physicochemical and biological characteristics and performance indicators of key ingredients for the formulation of added value product concepts.

Although the practical activity will require individual reports, you will work in a group using state-of-the-art facilities in the pilot plant to produce and analyse important food products in contemporary manufacture.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On successful completion of this course you should be able to:

  1. Appreciate the importance of and the trends in new product development (NPD) for the food industry.
  2. Define and explain in depth the concepts and relevance of emulsification, gelation and water activity to product development.
  3. Explain the glass transition phenomenon and its relevance to the rates of reactions in product development.
  4. Explain and critically evaluate the interrelationship between the technical properties of key ingredients and their ultimate functional attributes in a food product.
  5. Identify and explain the advantages and disadvantages of key ingredients in relation to their molecular structure and associated functionality for product development.
  6. Understand, explain and critically evaluate three different approaches that can be used in product-development experimentation to develop or improve a product.
  7. Identify and evaluate product and process variables and associated responses to be measured during PD experimentation.
  8. Write succinct but meaningful reports associated with product development as guided in the practical sessions of this course.
  9. Participate effectively in preparing the report and presentation for the group assignment on contemporary food products.


This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes at AQF level 7 for BP199 Bachelor of Science (Food Technology & Nutrition):

 

PLO 1.0 Demonstrate a coherent understanding of science

PLO1.1 You will demonstrate  an understanding of the scientific method and an ability to apply the scientific method in practice.

 

PLO 2.0 Exhibit depth and breadth of scientific knowledge, specifically:

PLO 2.1 You will demonstrate a depth and breadth of the core concepts in food science and technology.

PLO 2.2 You will demonstrate an ability to implement the principles and practices that underpin product development, food processing and preservation, ingredients interaction, and quality assurance.

PLO2.3 You will develop an appreciation of the significance of research to the development of innovative, safe and healthy foods.

 

PLO 3.0 Critically analyse and solve scientific problems, specifically:

PLO 3.1 You will demonstrate an ability to apply scientific principles and methods to solve problems associated with food technology and/or nutrition.

PLO 3.3 You will demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate critical and analytical thought to issues related to food technology and/or nutrition.

 

PLO 4.0 Demonstrate effective communications of science, specifically:

PLO 4.2 You will demonstrate an ability to write technical and scientific reports.

 

PLO 5.0 Demonstrate accountability for your own learning and scientific work, specifically:

PLO 5.1 You will demonstrate accountability for your own learning and professional conduct.

PLO 5.2 You will demonstrate initiative and independence.

PLO 5.3 You will demonstrate an ability to work responsibly, safely and ethically.

PLO 5.4 You will develop an ability to work collaboratively.


Overview of Learning Activities

You will learn in this course by:

  1. Attending lectures (strongly recommended) where materials will be presented and explained, and the subject matter will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples.
  2. Regular, private study to gain an understanding of the materials presented in the lectures and the practical sessions.
  3. Participating constructively during the lecture, tutorial sessions at the end of the lectures, and the practical activity i.e. come prepared and ask questions.
  4. Attempting some of the tutorial questions that are available at the end of each lecture, which are designed to give you practice in application of theory, and at solving conceptual problems.
  5. Completing the practical reports in a meaningfully way i.e. do the homework necessary for you to understand, and be able to describe and explain the concepts and principles being raised in each practical session.
  6. Utilising the technical and non-technical feedback on your progress given from the first test and on the laboratory reports.
  7. Working effectively in a team for the assignment that will require a report and a group presentation.

 Total Study Hours

Approximately 48 hours teacher directed hours for lectures, practicals and tutorials per student.

Approximately 60 hours student directed hours for private study and assignment work.


Overview of Learning Resources

You will be provided with lists of relevant texts, library resources (Including appropriate journals) and freely accessible Internet sites. Other material will be provided in class.


Overview of Assessment

Note that: This course has no hurdle requirements.

 

Assessment tasks

 

Assessment Task 1:  One mid-semester test (20%)

Including all lecture and practical materials covered up to the time of the test.

This assessment task supports CLOs 1 – 7

 

Assessment Task 2:  Three (3) individual practical reports (30%)

Covering the relevant practical materials.

  This assessment task supports CLOs 2 - 5 and 8.

 

Assessment Task 3:  Group assignments and presentations (20%)

Covering a specific allocated topic.

This assessment task supports CLOs 2 – 5 and 8.

 

Assessment Task 4:  End of first semester examination (30%)

  Covering all lecture and practical materials.

This assessment task supports CLOs 1 – 7.