Course Title: Discrete Mathematics

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Discrete Mathematics

Credit Points: 12.00


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

MATH1150

City Campus

Undergraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 1 2016

MATH1150

City Campus

Undergraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Internet

Sem 2 2016

MATH1150

City Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

MATH2045

City Campus

Postgraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 1 2016

MATH2045

City Campus

Postgraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Internet

Sem 2 2016

MATH2045

City Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

MATH2045

City Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Internet

Sem 2 2017

Course Coordinator: Dr Graham Clarke

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 3225

Course Coordinator Email: g.clarke@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 8.9.62


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

This course introduces and studies (with an emphasis on problem solving) several of the main areas of discrete mathematics, which provide important knowledge and skills for the applied scientist. The subject demonstrates the importance of these discrete mathematical topics for applied science.

Topics will include in particular:

1. Basic foundations (sets, functions and arithmetic)
2. Logic and proof techniques
3. Binary relations and a short introduction to graphs
 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On completion of this course you should be able to:

1. Identify and apply basic concepts of set theory, arithmetic, logic, proof techniques, binary relations, graphs and trees
2. Produce convincing arguments, conceive and/or analyse basic mathematical proofs and discriminate between valid and unreliable arguments.
3. Apply the knowledge and skills obtained to investigate and solve a variety of discrete mathematical problems
4. Communicate both technical and non-technical information in a range of forms (written, oral, electronic, graphic,) and work as an effective team member.
5. Make effective use of appropriate technology.
6. Reflect on your own learning and that of peers.


This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for BP083 Bachelor of Science, BP245 Bachelor of Science (Statistics) and BH119 Bachelor of Analytics (Honours) and MC159 Master of Applied Science (Information Security and Assurance):

Knowledge and technical competence:

• use the appropriate and relevant, fundamental and applied mathematical and statistical knowledge, methodologies and modern computational tools.

Problem-solving:

• synthesise and flexibly apply knowledge to characterise, analyse and solve a wide range of problems
• balance the complexity / accuracy of the mathematical / statistical models used and the timeliness of delivery of the solution.

Teamwork and project management

• contribute to professional work settings through effective participation in teams and organisation of project tasks
• constructively engage with other team members and resolve conflict.

Communication

• communicate both technical and non-technical material in a range of forms (written, electronic, graphic, oral) and tailor the style and means of communication to different audiences. Of particular interest is the ability to explain technical material, without unnecessary jargon, to lay persons such as the general public or line managers.

Information literacy

• locate and use data and information and evaluate its quality with respect to its authority and relevance.


Overview of Learning Activities

Key concepts will be explained and illustrated in detail in lectures.
Supervised tutorials will develop your capacity to use and apply the concepts, solve problems, build mathematical arguments and think critically and analytically. Tutorials  will also provide an opportunity for feedback on your understanding and academic progress. Activities are included to enhance your ability to communicate mathematical ideas.

You will have access to the WebLearn system of on-line practice tests, known as WebLearn quizzes. The aim of the WebLearn quizzes is to enhance personal study by providing a self-help resource with instant feedback.

Four hours per week for one semester comprising lectures, laboratory sessions and class exercises. You may need to study an additional four hours per week outside of class activities.


Overview of Learning Resources

All course material will be provided online through myRMIT Studies. These resources will include lecture notes on selected topics, slides, articles, internet links, Weblearn tests, recording of the lectures and exercises.
Additional supporting documents can be found at http://rmit.libguides.com/mathstats and http://rmit.libguides.com/compsci
 


Overview of Assessment

☒ This course has no hurdle requirements.

Assessment Tasks

Assessment Task 1: Class Tests
Weighting 24%
This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
Three class tests in week 3, 6 and 9. Each test assesses a precise part of the program. Sample examples will be provided through blackboard. You are encouraged to use these tests to reflect on learning.

Assessment Task 2: Weblearn Tests
Weighting 12% (face-to-face delivery), 20% (online delivery)
This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 5, 6
Weblearn online tests will be conducted from week 2 to 9 and the best 6 are taken into account (2% each).  You will first train yourself with quizzes to reflect on your learning before completing the test. This assessment allows you to test your basic knowledge of the course content from the previous week.

Assessment Task 3:  Essay
Weighting 8% (face-to-face delivery), 12% (online delivery)
This assessment task supports CLO 4
1 page essay about a general subject related to mathematics. All instructions will be provided on your blackboard and explained in class.

Assessment Task 4: Group project
Weighting 12% (face-to-face delivery only)
This assessment supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
You will work in groups and enhance your communication skills including the ability to communicate mathematical ideas. The subject to be chosen is completely open, provided that it is linked to the course. Only the format of the delivery (slide presentation, video, etc.) will be imposed. All instructions will be provided on your blackboard and explained in class.

Assessment Task 5: Additional activities
Weighting 4%
This assessment supports CLOs 4, 5, 6
You will participate in four different activities (self assessment. communication activities, feedback survey). To get the maximum grade (1% for each activity) you just need to fully participate. All instructions will be provided on your blackboard and explained in class.

Assessment 6: Final Exam 
Weighting 40% 
This assessment supports CLOs 1, 2, 3