Course Title: Professional Computing Practice

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Professional Computing Practice

Credit Points: 12.00


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

COSC1146

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006

COSC1147

City Campus

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016

COSC1147

City Campus

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 2 2009

COSC2130

RMIT University Vietnam

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Viet2 2007,
Viet2 2008,
Viet1 2009,
Viet2 2009,
Viet3 2009,
Viet1 2010,
Viet2 2010,
Viet3 2010,
Viet1 2011,
Viet2 2011,
Viet3 2011,
Viet1 2012,
Viet2 2012,
Viet3 2012,
Viet1 2013,
Viet2 2013,
Viet3 2013,
Viet1 2014,
Viet3 2014,
Viet1 2016,
Viet3 2016

COSC2130

RMIT University Vietnam

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Viet2 2017

COSC2241

Taylors College KL

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Offsh 3 10

Course Coordinator: Assoc. Prof. Margaret Hamilton

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2939

Course Coordinator Email: margaret.hamilton@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 14.10.02

Course Coordinator Availability: by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

Enforced Requisite: ISYS1117 Software Engineering Fundamentals or an equivalent course


Course Description

This course is an introduction to computing ethics, law and marketing. It is intended for CSIT students who have not studied business principles, or who have little work experience in industry. The course provides a survival kit for CSIT graduates entering the workforce. During this course, you should consider computing ethical issues, such as information privacy, computer crime, computer terrorism. During this course, you should also consider the international legal framework available to protect software system development. This includes non-disclosure agreements, employment contracts, intellectual property law (copyright, patent, licensing, royalties), trademarks and warranty disclaimers. Additionally, you should examine the marketing of a software system development, involving SWOT analysis and action plan


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs) for BP096 Bachelor of Software Engineering,

BP094 Bachelor of Computer Science, BP162 Bachelor of Information Technology, BP232 Bachelor of Technology (Computing Studies):

  • Enabling Knowledge:

You will gain skills as you apply knowledge effectively in diverse contexts.

  • Critical Analysis:

You will learn to accurately and objectively examine and consider computer science and information technology (IT) topics, evidence, or situations, in particular to: evaluate and compare designs of software artefacts and IT systems on the basis of organisational and user requirements.

  • Communication:

You will learn to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences through a range of modes and media, in particular to: present a clear, coherent and independent exposition of software applications, alternative IT solutions, and decision recommendations to both IT and non-IT personnel via technical reports of professional standard and technical presentations.

  • Team Work:

You will learn to work as an effective and productive team member in a range of professional and social situations, in particular to: work effectively in different roles, to form, manage, and successfully produce outcomes from teams, whose members may have diverse cultural backgrounds and life circumstances, and differing levels of technical expertise.

  • Responsibility:

You will be required to accept responsibility for your own learning and make informed decisions about judging and adopting appropriate behaviour in professional and social situations. This includes accepting the responsibility for independent life-long learning. Specifically, you will learn to: effectively apply relevant standards, ethical considerations, and an understanding of legal and privacy issues to designing software applications and IT systems.


Upon successful completion of this course you should be able to:

  1. recognise the need for computing ethics in the Information Technology (IT) industry and the complexities involved in computer ethical issues, and use the available legal tools to safeguard a developer’s interests when developing / publishing / marketing software
  2. discuss, explain and apply concepts of business organization, business practices, marketing principles and the major ethical theories
  3. discuss, explain and apply ethical, social media, political, economic, legal, and marketing issues relevant to the IT industry; and methods available to resolve these issues including the legalities involved in starting a computer (software) company
  4. discuss, analyse and evaluate computing practice case studies, prepare SWOT analyses, and create detailed marketing plans using the proper language of the field in both written and oral presentations
  5. work effectively in a small group of peers to analyse computing practice scenarios, and to assess the work of peers
  6. demonstrate self-directed learning and more specifically the role of life-long learning for the longevity and progression of your career in IT.


Overview of Learning Activities

The learning activities included in this course are:

  • key concepts will be explained in lectures, classes or online, where syllabus material will be presented and the subject matter will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples
  • tutorials and/or labs and/or group discussions (including online forums) focus on analyse computing practice scenarios, evaluate and present computing practice case studies and to prepare SWOT analyses; providing practice in the application of theory and procedures, and exploration of concepts such as marketing, social, ethical and legal issues with teaching staff and other students, and feedback on your progress and understanding
  • individual and group assessments, requiring an integrated approach to the subject
  • private study, working through the course as presented in classes and learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and technical problems.

 

A total of 120 hours of study is expected during this course, comprising:

Teacher-directed hours (48 hours): lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions. Each week there will be 2 hours of lecture plus 1 hour of tutorial plus 1 hour of computer laboratory work. You are encouraged to participate during these sessions through asking questions, commenting on the materials based on your own experiences and through presenting solutions to exercises.

Student-directed hours (72 hours): You are expected to be self-directed, studying independently outside class.


Overview of Learning Resources

The course is supported by the Blackboard learning management system which provides specific learning resources. See the RMIT Library Guide at http://rmit.libguides.com/compsci


Overview of Assessment

The assessment for this course comprises

 Note: This course has no hurdle requirements.

 

Assessment tasks

 

Assessment Task 1:  Group Assignment

Weighting 10%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, & 3.

Assessment Task 2: Group Assignment

Weighting 25%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1 - 6.

Assessment Task 3: Presentation

Weighting 15%

This assessment task supports CLOs 3 - 6.

Assessment 4:  Lab Tests

Weighting 10% 

This assessment supports CLOs 1 - 6.

Assessment 5:  Exam

Weighting 40% 

This assessment supports CLOs 1 - 6.