Course Title: Public Sector Economics

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Public Sector Economics

Credit Points: 12


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ECON1091

City Campus

Undergraduate

625H Economics, Finance and Marketing

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015

ECON1240

City Campus

Postgraduate

625H Economics, Finance and Marketing

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016

Course Coordinator: Professor Sinclair Davidson

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 5869

Course Coordinator Email: sinclair.davidson@rmit.edu.au


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

PLEASE NOTE:

THE UNDERGRADUATE OFFERING OF THIS COURSE IS ONLY AVAILABLE TO THOSE STUDENTS ENROLLED IN THE BACHELOR OF BUSINESS (ECONOMICS AND FINANCE) (HONOURS) - BH039 - PROGRAM

Postgraduate students may enrol in this course, provided they have a Distinction average in an undergraduate economics and finance degree.


Course Description

Students will examine a range of issues associated with government intervention in the workings of the economy, and the role of the State generally. Issues will include property rights, congestion, taxation, public debt, regulation and theories of the state. Students may nominate any other topics that they may be interested in. The final content of the course will be negotiated with students at the first class meeting.

If you are undertaking this course in Melbourne from semester 2, 2012 onwards your teacher will advise you if you require access to a computer for the course. It is recommended that you have access to a mobile computing device to allow greater flexibility in terms of where you can work on campus outside class times.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Students will be equipped to critically analyse a range of government activities and initiatives as they impact upon the economy.
Students will be able to establish facts and organise them in a coherent framework and apply that framework in the analysis of government activity.
 



Overview of Learning Activities

Face-to-face discussion. Supplimented by broad reading and debate.


Overview of Learning Resources

There is no prescribed textbook. Students are expected to make use of the library facilities and also the internet.


Overview of Assessment

There will be two written assignments. Thirty percent of the assessment consists of a class participation mark.

Students must demonstrate that they have understood the material and can apply it in a ‘real-world’ setting. Answers must be typed on A4 sized paper in Times New Roman 12 point font and be 1.5 spaced. Test Assignments will not be returned. Students, upon making an appointment, may view their assignments. An assessment review will only be provided if you apply, in writing, to the Head of School within one month of the official notification of results.

Plagiarism: the presentation of the work, idea or creation of another person as though it is your own. It is a form of cheating and is a very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University. Plagiarised material can be drawn from, and presented in, written, graphic and visual form, including electronic data, and oral presentations. Plagiarism occurs when the origin of the material used is not appropriately cited.