Course Title: Gene Technologies

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Gene Technologies

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

BIOL2102

City Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2012

BIOL2184

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

BIOL2184

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Assoc. Professor Aidyn Mouradov

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925-7144

Course Coordinator Email: aidyn.mouradov@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 223-1 Bundoora West campus

Course Coordinator Availability: by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

This course assumes a level of knowledge in genetics, cell biology and biochemistry equivalent to at least the completion of a second year tertiary course. This course assumes a background level of knowledge in cell biology, genetics and biological chemistry equivalent to that achieved in BIOL2146 Cell Structure & Function, BIOL2262 or BIOL2263 Genetics and Molecular Biology and BIOL2260 Biological Chemistry.  If you can demonstrate a comparable level of knowledge through equivalent level study or experience you may be admitted to the course.


Course Description

This course aims to provide you with an understanding of the principles and methodologies of recently developed gene technologies and the applications of these technologies to the diagnosis and treatment of disease and the development of new products through genetic manipulation.

.Topic areas include a detailed study of molecular biology techniques, particularly gene cloning and expression systems such as plasmids, construction and screening of genomic libraries, foreign gene transfer and expression systems in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, high throughput gene sequencing and microarrays and the use of gene expression profiling. Emerging technologies are used to diagnose disease, develop therapeutics, new foods and transgenic crops. 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

This course contributes to the BP226 Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology) Program Learning Outcomes:

1 Understanding science

1.1. You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of biological sciences by articulating the methods of science and explaining why current biological knowledge is both contestable and testable through further inquiry.

1.2. You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of biological sciences by explaining the role and relevance of biological sciences in society.

2 Scientific knowledge

2.1. You will exhibit depth and breadth of knowledge by demonstrating a well-developed understanding of biological sciences.

2.2. You will exhibit depth and breadth of knowledge by demonstrating that biotechnology has interdisciplinary connections with other sciences.

3 Inquiry and problem solving

3.1. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology  by gathering, synthesizing and critically evaluating information from a range of sources.

3.2. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by designing and planning an investigation, including developing a testable hypothesis.

3.3. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by selecting and applying practical and/or theoretical techniques with technical competence in conducting field, laboratory-based, or virtual experiments.

3.4. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by collecting, accurately recording, interpreting, and drawing conclusions from scientific data.

4 Communication

4.1. You will be an effective communicator of biological sciences by effectively communicating scientific results, information, or arguments using a range of modes (oral, written, visual) for a variety of purposes and audiences.

5 Personal and professional responsibility

5.1. You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work in biotechnology by being an independent and self-directed learner.

5.2. You will be accountable for  individual learning and scientific work by working effectively, responsibly, ethically, and safely in an individual or team context.

5.3. You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work by  demonstrating knowledge of the regulatory frameworks and ethical principles relevant to biotechnology.

 

 


On successful completion of this course you should be able to: 

  1. Recall the principles of molecular biology and their application;
  2. Identify the recombinant DNA techniques and how they are applied to develop new products and treatments for human and animal diseases;
  3. Perform laboratory skills safely and carefully, demonstrating knowledge of hazards, their prevention and safety; 
  4. Comprehend theoretical and technical molecular structures and functions of DNA, as well as the various methods of DNA cloning, strategies and gene expression;
  5. Coordinate and perform molecular biological procedures;
  6. Critically analyse and discuss the results of laboratory investigation

 


Overview of Learning Activities

You will be guided through the course with a series of lectures, practical classes and tutorials in the laboratory to develop knowledge and technical skills. The normal modes of teaching will be about two hours of lectures and between three to four hours of practical/tutorials most weeks.

The practical component of this course may be delivered as intensive sessions held over 4 or 5 full days rather than weekly sessions.

Other activities include self-directed learning by computer-assisted learning, review of literature and current publications as well as accessing a number of resources available over the internet .

You will be actively encouraged to attend and participate in all planned student learning experiences, i.e. lectures and practical classes, reading of relevant reference materials pointed out during student learning experiences and undertaking the necessary study to personally benefit your learning of the subject material.

While attendance is not compulsory in this subject, satisfactory completion of all programmed learning activities is required; in particular, the practical exercises are necessary to develop appropriate knowledge and skills to successfully pass this course.

Total Study Hours

A total of 120 hours of study is expected during this course, comprising:

Teacher-guided hours (72 hours): Each week there will be two hours of face-to-face lecture (24 hours total) plus 4 hour laboratory practical sessions (48 hours). You are encouraged to participate during lectures through asking questions, commenting on the lecture material based on your own study.

Student-directed hours (48 hours): You are expected to be self-directed, studying independently outside class. A minimum of 4 hours per week is recommended.

 


Overview of Learning Resources

The course web site provides a syllabus, lecture notes, handouts for the laboratory practicals sample assignments and test questions, and references to additional resources. Information on additional readings will be provided.


Overview of Assessment

 Note that: This course has no hurdle requirements. 

Assessments are as follows:

1. A series of quizzes and assignments (30%)

These small assessment tasks aim to help you identify improvements required and manage your learning.

These assessments support CLOs 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6

 

2. Practical components (20%)

This assessment supports CLOs 2, 4, 5 & 6

 

3. Written exam 50%

This assessment supports CLOs 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6