Course Title: Diagnosis in Western Medicine

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Diagnosis in Western Medicine

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

MEDS2050

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

150H Health Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012

MEDS2128

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

150H Health Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2016

Course Coordinator: Dr William Lin

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 7696

Course Coordinator Email: billlin@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 202.4.56 PO Box 71 Bundoora VIC 3083


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

You should have satisfactorily completed the prerequisite

BIOL2044 Human Physiology 2 - Body System 2
BIOL2275 Head and Visceral Anatomy

before you commence this course.
 

Alternatively you may be able to demonstrate the required skills and knowledge before you start this course. Contact your course coordinator if you think you may be eligible for recognition of prior learning. For further information go to: www.rmit.edu.au/students/enrolment/credit/he

Note it is a condition of enrolment at RMIT that you accept responsibility for ensuring that you have completed the prerequisite/s and agree to concurrently enrol in co-requisite courses before enrolling in a course.
For your information the RMIT Course Requisites policy can be found at: www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=twx09y07zi1c
 


Course Description

Diagnosis in Western Medicine is a one-semester course introducing basic knowledge Western medical diagnostic procedures. It also provides basic knowledge of western medical diagnostic procedures and diagnostic tools. Most of the study will focus on clinically related knowledge, comparison between Western Medicine and Chinese Medicine and facilitate further study in common clinical conditions.

Since there is terminology peculiar to western medicine, western medicine terminology included in the course will contribute to achievement of communication capabilities that will be important in the work force, for example, practitioner communication with patients, their families, other health professionals, regulatory bodies, herbal/acupuncture instrument suppliers and the general public effectively.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Graduate Capabilities
The capabilities that are developed through the program in which you are enrolled are described in the Program Guide. This course contributes to the development of the following capabilities

C1 provide specialised health care within a patient-centred, evidence-based framework;
C2 gather clinical information to make accurate differential diagnoses, assessment and management plans and carry out effective treatment;
C3 practice as a competent health care professional in a safe, ethical and legally responsible manner;
C4 demonstrate cultural awareness and sensitivity in the provision of specialized health care;
C5 communicate effectively in a range of forms (written, online, oral) and with diverse audiences (patients, community/public, agencies and health professionals);
C6 work independently and in teams, specifically to lead and contribute to inter-professional care partnerships


Upon completion of this course, you shall have basic knowledge to apply western medical terminologies in practice, to apply western medicine principles and diagnostic skills in diagnosis of disease, to refer to other practitioners, particularly medical practitioners, when appropriate in a timely manner, to communicate (bilaterally) effectively with patients, other health professionals, regulatory bodies, herbal/acupuncture instrument suppliers and the general public.

Upon completion of this Course, students shall be able to:
1. Understand the fundamental theories and principles of diagnosis;
2. Undertake history taking and case recording correctly;
3. Be proficient in the skills of physical examination and special examination procedures and demonstrate the ability to perform a thorough physical examination and interpret the findings;
4. Demonstrate skills in diagnosis for decision-making in rendering of emergency care;
5. Be proficient in the clinical application of various types of instrumentations (e.g. blood pressure evaluation) utilised in primary care practice;
6. Be proficient in diagnosis and differential diagnoses for preparing and presenting case reports.
7. Understand differences and similarities of diagnostic skills and tools between Western Medicine and Chinese Medicine.
8. Enrich Chinese Medicine diagnostic skills and decision making through comprehension of Western medical diagnostic skills, decision making.


Overview of Learning Activities

A range of learning experiences is planned for this course including lectures, tutorials, and practical classes. The lectures are provided to assist you in comprehending the clinical meanings of the presenting symptoms and signs collected via history taking and physical examinations. The tutorial classes are provided to give you the opportunity to consolidate the information given by the lecturer. The practical classes are provided to help you master the skills of history taking and physical examinations. You are strongly advised to attend and participate in all teaching sessions. A comparison between Western Medicine and Chinese Medicine will also be discussed.

Most of the study will focus on clinically related knowledge, comparison between Western Medicine and Chinese Medicine and facilitate further study in common clinical conditions.

You will be introduced to and expected to read the prescribed textbook. Written assessment tasks require you to learn how to think in a practical way about the skills of history taking and physical examinations. Active and constructive participation in e-conference is expected in addition to weekly reading. You are also expected to locate two real patient cases from which you will obtain adequate information of the presenting signs and symptoms and record the information collected in a form of comprehensive history record.
 


Overview of Learning Resources

The learning resources associated with this course will include targeted readings taken from a range of both primary and secondary sources. All material to be chosen will be digitally available to you. Lecture material will be delivered via Lectopia, Discussion Board interaction and Blackboard Collaborate (formerly Elluminate) workshops. Practice learning activities will be provided in a variety of ways, including simulated learning activities. RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems.


Overview of Assessment

The assessment tasks will be designed to assess students’ ability to understand and apply concepts in diagnosis in western medicine. This module is assessed by assignment, written and practical exams.

The assessment associated with this course will comprise a formative and summative assessment and incorporate a variety of assessment modes. Assessment tasks will be used to assess your ability to apply Chinese medicine theory in clinical diagnostic procedures. This may include, but is not restricted to, the following: participation in discussion formats, examinations, assignments and clinical practice laboratories. It may also include use of online technology in the form of a critically reflective online journal or blog. Assessments are designed to require you to demonstrate a critical analysis of the core principles presented in the course.

The assessment associated with this course will comprise a formative and summative assessment and incorporate a variety of assessment modes. This may include, but is not restricted to, the following: participation in discussion formats, examinations, assignments and clinical practice laboratories. It may also include use of online technology in the form of a critically reflective online journal or blog. Assessments are designed to require you to demonstrate a critical analysis of the core principles presented in the course.

For information on grades used in RMIT courses see: www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=yhbhsddxqou9#ID=yhbhsddxqou9

Assessment completed in the first half of the semester will provide feedback on your progress. Ongoing feedback on your skills will be provided from peers and staff.

If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.
This course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies and procedures which are described at: http://www.rmit.edu.au/students/assessment