Course Title: Theories of Development

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Theories of Development

Credit Points: 12


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

HUSO2074

City Campus

Postgraduate

330H Social Science & Planning

Distance / Correspondence or Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2006

HUSO2074

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Distance / Correspondence or Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2007,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 1 2008

HUSO2074

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 1 2009,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016,
Sem 1 2017

HUSO2074

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Internet

Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014

Course Coordinator: Associate Professor Yaso Nadarajah

Course Coordinator Phone: +(61 3) 9925 3542

Course Coordinator Email: yaso.nadarajah@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 37.05.28

Course Coordinator Availability: email for appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None.


Course Description

This course will provide you with an overview of key theoretical perspectives and debates which underpin various approaches to international development. You will focus on the theoretical debates that inform policy and practice.

Throughout this course you will critically explore the assumptions, rationale and ethics of development in thought and practice. Emphasis is placed on how the term ’development’ has evolved as a key area of policy associated with global institutions of incredible influence over the lives of people living in poor countries. You will investigate the values underpinning development as a set of economic, political, social and cultural objectives, especially the Eurocentric nature of the language in which development is embedded. In addition the ‘language of development’ as an accepted set of arguments and statements of fact is considered in relation to the development process itself.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Analyse and review key debates about development theory
  • Analyse the implications of current development debates relating to major social, political and economic transformations in developing countries.
  • Critically evaluate the various meanings of development and analyse how these meanings are irrevocably linked with culture and language.
  • Relate theoretical perspectives and debates to practice and policy issues and dilemmas.
  • Argue ways in which diverse theoretical perspectives lead to alternative and competing possibilities for analysis and action
  • Recognise the relationship between theories and practice where theory might explain ‘the why’, with practice as offering ‘the how’


You will be assessed on your development of the following program learning outcomes:

  • critically reflect on socio-cultural diversity and values, world systems and the benefits of local and global development practices for communities engaged in development processes
  • determine and apply the specialist knowledge and technical skills required to creatively solve problems, demonstrating expert judgment and ethical responsibility in your professional practice in international development
  • critically analyse, synthesize and reflect on personal awareness and lived experience, theories and practices of development, both local and international, to extend and challenge knowledge and practice in the discipline
  • critically reflect on the causes and impacts of poverty in global contexts and to evaluate the theories and practice of development institutions


Overview of Learning Activities

Learning activities will provide opportunities for you to explore, critique and form ideas. Activities will include small group discussion, reviewing online materials including audio/visual content, and interactive lectures. Active and constructive participation in group discussions is expected in addition to weekly reading and careful planning of assessment tasks. Assessment tasks are designed to provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the key themes and debates.

 


Overview of Learning Resources

You will have access to core readings for class discussion and essay preparation, and a list of recommended readings and a substantive bibliography for broader readings on selected topics. RMIT will provide you with additional resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems via myRMIT Studies, and additional sources, links and postings of relevant material will be made available online.
 


Overview of Assessment

You will be assessed on how well you meet the course’s learning outcomes and on your development against the program learning outcomes. Your ability to clearly explain key concepts will be assessed by written work and oral activities. Assessment may include reports, projects and presentations, individually and in groups. Feedback will be given on all assessment tasks. Feedback will also be provided throughout the semester in class and/or online discussions, through individual and group feedback on essay topics and by individual consultation.

  • If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.
  • A student charter http://www.rmit.edu.au/about/studentcharter summarises your responsibilities as an RMIT student as well as those of your teachers.
  • Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions which are available for review online: http://www.rmit.edu.au/policies/academic#assessment