Course Title: Lipids in Food Science

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Lipids in Food Science

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ONPS2143

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

Course Coordinator: Dr Bogdan Zisu

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 99259652

Course Coordinator Email: bogdan.zisu@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 201.06.07

Course Coordinator Availability: Monday to Friday by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

.No Enforced Pre-requisites, however, the course assumes knowledge in food chemistry or equivalent capabilities.  Recommended capabilities are those developed in Chemistry Principles CHEM1242, CHEM1243 and Chemistry for Life Sciences CHEM1239, CHEM1240 or an equivalent course


Course Description

This course is one of a series of three courses designed to provide overarching principles for the functionality and processing of the three major food constituents namely proteins, carbohydrates and lipids. In this course you will be required to integrate the consumer, health, business and technical aspects of lipids. This food component group is of interest and concern, because you are arguably the most attractive of the major components from a consumer (sensory) viewpoint but the most damaging from a health viewpoint. You will examine the social implications of lipids as a public health requirement to not only reduce overall lipid consumption but also ensure that lipids are correctly selected for differing uses. You will be required to integrate the consumer, health, business and technical aspects of lipids.

Lipids are required for various functional properties in many common food manufacturing processes (eg frying and separating layers in pastry). You will explore the distinct sensory and functional properties of lipids and the range of health characteristics they confer on consumers. This course will provide knowledge on the properties of lipids; lipid extraction, analysis,purification and modification;health aspects of lipids; homogenisation, emulsifiers, antioxidants and fat replacers. As there is a large degree of interchange ability between various fats and oils the course will provide a framework for integrating the knowledge in order to make informed business decisions. It will also cover the manufacture of predominantly lipid products such as butter, margarine, salad dressings, couvertures and coatings.
 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for BP199, Bachelor of Science (Food Technology and Nutrition):

PLO-1 Understanding Science

1.2 On successful completion of this course you will be able to demonstrate a coherent understanding of the science and technology of lipids and lipid based products and relevance in society.

 

PLO-2 Scientific Knowledge

2.1 On successful completion of this course you will be able to demonstrate a knowledge of the properties of lipidsand lipid based products and the core concepts of lipid science and technology.

2.2 On successful completion of this course you will be able toimplement the principles and practices that underpin lipid analyses.

 

PLO-3 Inquiry and Problem Solving

3.1 On successful completion of this course you will be able to apply scientific principles to evaluate and or deduce the effects of formulation and processing on the end product characteristics of lipid based products.

 

PLO-4 Communication

4.1 On successful completion of the course you will be able to effectively communicate information concerning lipids and lipid based products using reporting and or presentation skills.

4.2 On successful completion of the course you will be able to demonstrate an ability to write scientific reports to communicate process information and the scientific and technical data collected during prac sessions.

 

PLO-5 Personal and Professional Responsibility

5.4 On successful completion of this course you will develop an ability to work collaboratively within a team of your peers during prac sessions.

 


On successful completion of this course you will be able to:

1. Identify sources of fats and oils and the functionality of different lipids in relation to their structure.

2. Demonstrate understanding of the health aspects associated with the consumption of fat.

3. Assess structural and functional characteristics including ‘interchange ability’ of lipids and evaluate and predict the relevant end-product characteristics of a range of lipid products.

4. Define methods of recovering useful ingredients from lipid processing plants and describe the processes and equipment used in the extraction, purification, modification and storage of lipids and lipid based products.

5. Perform analyses of lipids.

6. Describe the role of emulsifiers and antioxidants in lipids, recognise the sensitivity of lipid components from the implications of variables (e.g., heat, oxygen, mineral concentration and/or physical factors) and appreciate aspects of lipid breakdown during frying.

 


Overview of Learning Activities

Learning and teaching strategies are based on:

• Lectures, where syllabus material will be presented and explained, and the subject will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples.

• A practical program, covering the analysis of lipids, the functionality of lipids in food products and or a plant visit to a lipid processing factory.

• Revision sessions will assist you with revision of the health, social and technical aspects as well as applications of lipids, their source, composition, properties and use.

• A literature search / review skills session to assist you with an assignment.

• Completion of an assignment requiring an integrated understanding of the subject matter and effective communication of concepts involved.

• Private study, working through the course as presented in classes and learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and numerical problems.

Total Study Hours

Teacher guided hours:44 per semester comprising of lectures, tutorials, and laboratory sessions.

Learner directed hours:80 per semester

 

 


Overview of Learning Resources

You will be provided with lists of relevant texts, library resources ,Including appropriate journals, and internet sites. 
You  will be able to access course information and learning material through the learning Hub. 
Laboratory sessions have been scheduled throughout the semester to give you an opportunity for hands-on experience .
Tutorial sessions will provide an opportunity for you to engage with peers as well as lecturing staff in relevant discussions .


Overview of Assessment

Note that:

☒This course has no hurdle requirements.

☐ All hurdle requirements for this course are indicated clearly in the assessment regime that follows, against the relevant assessment task(s) and all have been approved by the College Deputy Pro Vice-Chancellor (Learning & Teaching).

 Assessment tasks

 Early Assessment Task: Preliminary assignment introducing key resources and presentational skills

Weighting 8%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 3, 4, 6.

Assessment Task 2: Reports on each practical analysis

Weighting 18%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Assessment Task 3: Performance in practical sessions

Weighting 5%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 3, 4, 5, 6.

Assessment Task 4: Tests during semester

Weighting 14%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6.

Assessment Task 5: Submission of a literature review assignment on a topic of significance and relevance to the area of study

Weighting 15%

This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 6.

Assessment Task 6: A two hour closed book final examination at the end of the semester.

Weighting 40%

This assessment supports CLOs 1-6.