Course Title: Farming The Future

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Farming The Future

Credit Points: 12


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

SOCU2098

City Campus

Undergraduate

315H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 2 2013

SOCU2098

City Campus

Undergraduate

320H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2014,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 1 2016,
Sem 2 2016

Flexible Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

SOCU2098

City Campus

Undergraduate

320H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

UGRDFlex17 (ZZZZ),

UGRDFlex17 (ZZZY)

Course Coordinator: Fiona Harrisson

Course Coordinator Phone: Contact via email

Course Coordinator Email: fiona.harrisson@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: B100.L08

Course Coordinator Availability: Appointment via email


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

Farming the Future is a field trip based course that provides insights into sustainability through listening to and talking with the people (farmers, community groups, government and other stakeholders). You will hear directly from those involved with making decisions, contesting, and negotiating a wide range of land based issues. Your field trip experience is also informed by reading academic literature, undertaking regional research and by conversations with students from other disciplines. As a participant in this course you will be asked to reflect on your own personal and disciplinary assumptions about sustainability; in light of your exposure to a multitude of views both spoken and written.

 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Capabilities to be developed through this course include:

  • participation in a community of learning’ where students and staff all learn from each other; and staff’s role as educators is to assist you to extend your capacity to interpret what you see, hear, read and discuss
  • undertaking different methods of research and analysis


At the completion of this course you will have an ability to:

  • Make connections between theory and experience in understanding of the term ‘sustainability’,
  • Identify, analyse and interpret the different ways of speaking and values underpinning various land managers and stakeholders views and actions,
  • Undertake and reflect on the implications of different research methods,
  • Reflect on own assumptions both personal and disciplinary through field trip activities and academic reading,
  • Undertake a recursive approach: where new observations and knowledges are developed from and in consideration of previous understandings through readings, site visits, discipline knowledge, conversations with others and you own observation
     


Overview of Learning Activities

PRE FIELD CLASS

The primary purpose of these classes is preparation and adminstration necessary for the fieldtrip. In these classes we will established the methods to be used on the trip including how;

  • discussion of sustainability has multiple and often contested meanings;
  • you will undertake your fieldwork and what is required;
  • you will link the academic reading to your fieldtrip experience;
  • you engage in different disciplinary and stakeholder understandings;
  • you develop and presented regional research undertaken in groups.

FIELDTRIP

You will be required to;

  • engage with different people telling their story of sustainability through listening and asking respectful questions;
  • take field notes and undertake required exercises and personal reflections in field workbook;
  • respond to questions asked to provoke you to to reflect on your experience and readings;
  • participate in and contribute to the smooth running of the field trip itself .


Overview of Learning Resources

Alvarez, A. and Rogers, J. (2006)‘Going “out there”: Learning about sustainability in place’, International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, 7, 2: 176-188.

Chambers, R. (1994) ‘Participatory Rural Appraisal (PRA):Analysis of Experience’, World Development, Vol. 22, No 9, pp 16: 1253-1268.

Pannell, D.J. and Schilizzi, S. (1999) ‘Sustainable agriculture: A question of ecology, ethics, economic efficiency or expedience?’ Journal of Sustainable Agriculture, 13(4): 57-66.

Sveiby, K.E. (2009) ‘Aboriginal Principles for Sustainable Development as Told in Traditional Law Stories’, Sustainable Development 10.1002/sd
 


Overview of Assessment

There are three parts to the assessment for this course:
Research (pre field trip)
Workbook
Participation