Course Title: Critical Criminology

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Critical Criminology

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

JUST2262

City Campus

Undergraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 1 2016

JUST2264

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 2 2015

JUST2264

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 1 2016,
Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Dr Peta Malins

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2110

Course Coordinator Email: peta.malins@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 37.4.19

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

Pre-requisite courses: None

Assumed knowledge will include basic/foundational criminological and/or socio-legal perspectives as well as practical understandings of the justice system.


Course Description

This course will focus on a range of critical theoretical perspectives relating to crime, law and social justice. You will explore a range of topics including: the current condition of critical theory in criminology and socio-legal studies; where critical theories fit ontologically and epistemologically; the differences between structural, constructionist and postmodern/poststructural approaches; and the role of critical theory in contemporary research, policy and practice. You will learn how to distinguish the assumptions and concepts underpinning a range of approaches including labelling and moral panic theories, different feminisms, queer theory, critical race and postcolonial perspectives, and you will examine the role that intersectionality is increasingly playing in critical justice studies. You will see how different concepts have been applied by researchers to change the way we think about, and respond to, a range of contemporary issues which might include: graffiti, policing, prisons, youth, class, corporate crime, Indigeneity, race, terrorism, refugees, climate change, gender, sexuality, sex work and human rights.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Upon the successful completion of this course you will be able to:   CLO1: Identify and critique various critical theories as they apply to the justice system; CLO2: Appraise the efficacy of critical theories used to address key issues in the justice field; CLO3: Synthesise an advanced level of knowledge of critical justice theory and apply it to real world problems; CLO4: Communicate effectively the options for application of critical theories to identified issues.


In this course you will develop the following program learning outcomes:

  • Use strategic, critical, creative, and analytical thinking to develop creative solutions to a range of dynamic problems associated with crime management and the justice system
  • Critically analyse, synthesise and reflect on complex theories, principles, philosophies and recent developments in the justice sector, both locally and globally, to extend and challenge knowledge and practice
  • Employ a wide range of research tools, methods and approaches to produce new knowledge of justice issues and guide policy development and inform decision making


Overview of Learning Activities

You will be engaged in learning that involves a series of online modules and readings with fortnightly face to face workshop discussions.

In order to develop your knowledge and skills, you will be expected to participate in interactive discussions and activities and to critically engage with the weekly reading materials. The workshops offer a supportive learning environment where you will have the opportunity to share your knowledge and experiences, and to learn from the knowledge and experience your peers. This peer-based learning may take place through small-group discussions, collaborative work on activities and assessments and/or peer reviewing of research, written work and/or oral presentations.


Overview of Learning Resources

You will be given access to a wide range of resources through a Course Reader or core textbook and also will be able to access to a wide range of online learning tools and content for your course from the student portal, myRMIT, and RMIT Library resources. These resources will include book chapters, journal articles, media articles, lecture notes, bibliographies for supplementary reading, video, and links to external websites.


Overview of Assessment

Assessment will include:

Assessment

Assessment Type

Word limit or equivalent

Assessment one

Module tasks

Assesses CLOs 1, 2

30%

Assessment two

Theory comparison essay

Assesses CLOs 2, 3

30%

Assessment three

Critical research essay

Assesses  CLOs 1 -4

40%

 

You will be assessed on how well you meet the course’s learning outcomes and on your development against the program learning outcomes.

 

Feedback will be given on all assessment tasks.

 

If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.

 

A student charter http://www.rmit.edu.au/about/studentcharter summarises your responsibilities as an RMIT student as well as those of your teachers.

 

Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions which are available for review online: http://www1.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=c15i3ciaq8ca