Course Title: Models of Practice and Sites of Intervention

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Models of Practice and Sites of Intervention

Credit Points: 12


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

HWSS2133

City Campus

Undergraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016

Course Coordinator: Kerry Montero

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 8269

Course Coordinator Email: kerry.montero@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 37.2.28


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

This course is designed to introduce students to thoughtful and reflexive models of youth work practice. The course is designed around a simple tripartite heuristic model for assessing the orientation and purpose of various kinds of youth work practice. This heuristic derived from Habermas’(1974) account of three basic knowledge constitutive interests (i.e. domination, expressivity and liberation). Students are encouraged to come to terms with these the way Habermas and other commentators have specified the forms of knowledge and practice that embody these three interests.

Students are introduced via a various of experiential and problem based learning models to key skill sets used for working with young people. These include effective interpersonal communication skills (e.g. critical listening, ), and interviewing ‘clients’, counseling skills and introductory level group work). These will be taught in ways that highlight the need to modify techniques according to the particular context and needs of young people. Students will also develop skills in designing and implementing client centered programs/interventions. An overview of client rights and responsibilities and protocols relating to privacy, are also part of this course.

As mentioned above, students are encouraged to reflect on the human interests they see operating in various youth work practice skills. This is achieved by asking the following kinds of questions: are the practices under consideration informed primarily by an interest in extending control or dominance of young people, or, is there a hermeneutic appeal or desire to promote what is considered good operating, or is there an interest in emancipating young people? We also establish what other factors inform professional judgments about what constitutes good youth work, and what actions and skills are most appropriate. The influence of the site of intervention (school, juvenile justice) on practices is also explored (ie., statutory and institutional requirements, culture).


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

By the end of this course students will:

  1. Be able to develop discipline knowledge and their professional practice by applying a heuristic model to identify the interests that inform various kinds of youth work practice
  2. demonstrate knowledge of key youth work skill sets. 
  3. Appreciate the need to modify techniques according to the particular context and needs of young people.
  4. develop skills in designing and implementing client centered programs and interventions.
  5. appreciate ‘client’ rights and responsibilities and protocols relating to privacy.
  6. Understand how other factors inform professional judgments about what constitutes good youth work, and the influence that the site of intervention has on those decisions.



Overview of Learning Activities

The kind of learning activities students will experience in this course include use of information and communications technology to research various sources, such as the Internet, printed media, historical, social science accounts, novels, and autobiographies.
Learning activities will also include formal lectures, workshops incorporating group work, active problem based learning, interviews, comparative and textual analysis, and field work.
 


Overview of Learning Resources

Students will need to access to prescribed and recommended texts and information technology (computers, data bases).


Overview of Assessment

Assessment tasks are directly linked to the stated objectives and graduates capabilities. Assessment tasks will include class based activities, and written reports, essays, folios, oral reports, and annotated visual reports.