Course Title: Sensory Evaluation and Consumer Behaviour

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Sensory Evaluation and Consumer Behaviour

Credit Points: 12.00

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ONPS2189

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015

ONPS2331

City Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 1 2015

ONPS2520

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2016

ONPS2520

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017,
Sem 2 2017,
Sem 2 2018

ONPS2526

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2016

ONPS2526

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017,
Sem 2 2017,
Sem 2 2018

Course Coordinator: Dr Lisa Newman

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 6113

Course Coordinator Email: lisa.newman@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 201.06.13

Course Coordinator Availability: Please email for an appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

There are no Enforced Requisite Courses. 

Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities - You should have knowledge of basic statistics and be familiar with a statistical package such as Minitab, SPSS or the Excel statistics add-on.


Course Description

The sensory sciences are central to research as well as studies in product development or modification, quality control and quality assurance. The effect of foods on our senses is neither simple nor totally understood. The complexity of the stimulus of a food product on any one of our senses is affected by a vast number of factors, including: nature and presentation of the specific food matrix, the age, gender, background, sensory sensitivity of the consumer, even the conditions under which the test is carried out. Despite these limitations, the area of sensory evaluation is used to establish the credibility of a potential new product or the effectiveness of a modification to a new product.

 

This course will develop students’ understanding and application of sensory evaluation. This is undertaken through an examination of the practical and theoretical aspects of sensory evaluation and analysis. In this course, students deal with practical real world sensory related problems in a team approach.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On successful completion of this course you should be able to demonstrate:

  1. The elements of good sensory practice.
  2. The application of discrimination, descriptive, and affective methods of sensory evaluation.
  3. The application of trained panellists including the procedure needed to train panellist.
  4. The application of sensory analysis to product development and quality assurance.
  5. The basic physiology associated with colour, taste and odour (flavour).
  6. The application the principles underlying colour measurement.
  7. The concepts associated with the texture of food.
  8. The statistical analysis, interpretation and communication of sensory data.


This course contributes to the follow Program Learning Outcomes at AQF level 7:   PLO-1 Understanding science 1.1 You will demonstrate an understanding of the scientific method and an ability to apply the scientific method in practice. 1.2 & 1.4 You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of the role and relevance of Food Science in society.   PLO-2 Scientific knowledge 2.1 You will exhibit depth and breadth of the core concepts in food science and technology 2.2 You will demonstrate an ability to implement the principles and practices that underpin product development and quality assurance 2.3 You will develop an appreciation of the significance of research to the development of innovative, safe and healthy foods   PLO-3 Inquiry and problem solving  3.2 & 3.4 You will be able to critically analyse and solve scientific problems by gathering and critically evaluating information from a range of sources (including scientific literature and data bases), and then synthesise information relevant to a scientific inquiry 3.3 You will be able to demonstrate the ability to employ and apply appropriate critical and analytical thought in a scientific manner to issues related to food technology.   PLO-4 Communication 4.1 You will be an effective communicator of sensory sciences by effectively communicating scientific results, information, or arguments (in written mode) for a variety of purposes and audiences.    PLO-5 Personal and professional responsibility 5.1 You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work by being an independent and self-directed learner.  5.3 & 5.4 5.2. You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work by working effectively, responsibly, ethically, and safely in an individual or team context.    This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for MC111 Master of Biotechnology:   PLO1 Understanding science  1.2 You will have an understanding of recent developments in a specialised areas of food science and biotechnology  1.3 You will demonstrate knowledge of research principles and methods applicable to food sciences   PLO2 Scientific knowledge 2.1 You will demonstrate cognitive skills in mastery of advanced theoretical knowledge in food science and apply this knowledge to solve complex problems in existing and new areas 2.2 You will generate and evaluate complex ideas and concepts at an abstract level   PLO3 Inquiry and problem solving 3.1 You will critically analyse and solve problems in food science by demonstrating creativity, initiative and a high level of autonomy in professional practice  


Overview of Learning Activities

You will be guided through the subject by structured lectures that will explain and discuss the key concepts. There will also be a set of practical classes in the laboratory to achieve competence in technical skills associated with sensory and instrumental evaluation of food products. You will have the roles of active learners and have the responsibility of attending and actively participating in all planned student learning experiences, i.e. lectures, tutorials and practical classes, reading all relevant references pointed out during planned student learning experiences and undertaking such other private study as will benefit your learning toward the objectives of the course. There will be non-contact work associated with complementary self-directed learning. There will also be an assignment by individuals and/or as a team on topics relating to the field of study.

Total Study Hours

120 hours total, including:

  • Lectures and tutorials: 36 hours (face-to-face)
  • Practical sessions (undertaken as part of a group): 10 hours (face-to-face)
  • Self-directed learning (assignments, revision, reading): 74 hours

 


Overview of Learning Resources

The major textbook for study is online via the RMIT library site. Other recommendations for sections of the course will be specific links to material supplied online or via links in material supplied. Lectures and practicals will be supplied as documents online via Canvas and some material may be supplied as audio recordings.


Overview of Assessment

This course has no hurdle requirements.

Assessment Task 1: Practical reports

You will submit reports based on the practical sessions.

Your first practical session report will be an early assessment task.

Weighting: 35%

This assessment task supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8

 

Assessment Task 2: Laboratory test (10 minutes)

You will tested on the practical skills you have learnt in the laboratory.

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3 and 4

 

Assessment 3: Career skills audit and reflection

You will create a video reflecting on the skills you have learnt during the course and how they can be useful to your future career and employability.

Weighting: 15%

This assessment supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8

 

Assessment 4: Final examination

Weighting: 40%

This assessment supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8

 

Please note that postgraduate students are expected to demonstrate deeper knowledge and higher level application of knowledge and skills than undergraduate students. There may be a postgraduate and an undergraduate version for the tests, reports and the end-of-semester examination.