Course Title: Applied Biochemical Methods

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Applied Biochemical Methods

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

BIOL2301

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

160H Medical Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

BIOL2301

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

173H School of Health and Biomed

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

BIOL2322

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

160H Medical Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

BIOL2322

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

173H School of Health and Biomed

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Assoc Prof Theo Macrides

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 7070

Course Coordinator Email: macrides@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 223.02.08


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

Prior Knowledge:  BIOL1177 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 1 and BIOL1181 Biochemistry & Molecular Biology 2 or equivalent courses.


Course Description

This course is intended to cover the capabilities of knowledge (of the chemical reactions of the cell, proteins, biochemical sensors, carbohydrates and functional genomics), technical (in biochemistry instrumentation including mass spectroscopy and GCMS), communication skills (through participation in group activities and while completing some of the assessments), reflective (to understand biochemical concepts, the principles of laboratory instrumentation and specialised techniques) and research (to develop research skills in biochemistry).

The syllabus is of one semester duration and is designed to include the knowledge, practical skills and attitudes that are required of graduates to work confidently and competently in a biochemistry laboratory engaged in routine analysis and research.
Through the incorporation of lectures, tutorials, and project based practical work the students are encouraged to develop their critical thinking and communication skills.
The combination of learning activities offered in this course is designed to equip graduates with a range of attributes that will give the student strong potential and ability to work equally well in the industrial or research biochemical fields.
The course is designed to expand the field of physical biochemistry, to understand the technology and scope of measuring techniques in biochemistry and apply them to accuracy, precision, productivity and research methods.
The course is intended to extend some topics already presented at an introductory biochemistry level and to understand the volume, variety and basic principles behind laboratory instrumentation and the need for specialized techniques and methodologies
The chemical reactions of the cell stand as a primary theme. Additionally, in stressing biological concerns, understanding of all physiological phenomenon based on the underlying chemistry is emphasized.
The advances in the biological sciences have largely depended on parallel advances in the technology of measuring and observing devices. Knowledge of these devices, new instrumentation methods and the basic principles behind analytical and industrial procedures will assist in general understanding of the equipment selection and an appreciation of good quality assurance and research procedures.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

 

This Biomedical Science program learning outcomes for this course are:

2: Exhibit a breadth and depth of scientific knowledge;

3: Critically analyse and solve scientific problems;

5: Demonstrate accountability for your own learning and scientific work


 

 

On the successful completion of this course, you should be able to:

  1. Apply an understanding of the methods and techniques associated with biomolecule separation and purification and be able to establish the principles for the criteria of their purity.
  2. Apply an understanding of the basic principles of biochemical sensor design, and the using biosensor measuring devices.
  3. Identify the types of electrophoretic techniques used in biomolecule separation. Differentiate between variants of the techniques including isoelectric focusing, rocket immunoelectrophoresis and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis.
  4. Understand the new diagnostic and forensic DNA techniques used in modern biochemical laboratories.
  5. Evaluate techniques used to study functional genomics that include microchip technology, serial analysis of gene expression and tagged sequence mutagenesis.
  6. Apply an understanding of basic principles to the operation  of biochemical instrumentation techniques including capillary gas liquid chromatography (glc), high performance liquid chromatography (hplc), mass spectrometry (ms), as well as gc and lc -mass spectrometry. Investigate proteome, protein arrays and the proteomic tools including 2D-electrohoresis, applications of mass spectrometry and  mass spectrometry in proteomics.


Overview of Learning Activities

Through lectures, practical exercises, and associated assignments and tutorials the students are encouraged to develop their critical thinking. The lectures and practical experiments will give the student an appreciation of how new advances in technology of reasoning devices will assist in biochemical understanding and research methods.

 

 

The course consist of 6 contact hours per week and 6 non-contact hours per week

2 hours of lectures per week for 11 weeks ( face to face)

 4 hours of practical work per week for 9 weeks ( including the laboratory session,  a prelaboratory and post laboratory  tutorial)

This is a total of fifty-eight (58) hours  for one semester comprising lectures /tutorials and laboratory sessions     


Overview of Learning Resources

Learning resources in this course include a prescribed textbook, practical manual and safety data sheet information, and full lecture notes prepared by lecturing staff in booklet form available from the RMIT Bundoora bookshop with self study questions.
Biochemical Literature
The lecture material in this course will be supplemented by a list of references, mainly to reviews, classified under different topics within the lecture material to be presented. Monographs and reviews relevant to a subject of interest are easily found through the use of a library catalogue and the subject indexes of the major review publications. Most academic libraries subscribe to World Wide Web-based reference search services such as those of Chemical Abstracts Services, Current Contents, Medline, and Science Citation Index. If used properly, these bibliographic search services are highly efficient tools for locating specific information.


Overview of Assessment

One two-hour Final Examination at the end-of -the -semester covering the Theoretical Biochemistry taught in the lecture program (30%)

One two-hour Practical Test on the Theory of Practical Work covering instrumentation and practical procedures taught in the course. This will be held at the end of the practical course in teaching week 12 (continuous assessment 25%)

Practical work, reports and assessment as required (continuous assessment 30%

Assignment for course revision and student progress (continuous assessment 15%)

The Final  Examination using both calculations and short answer questions will allow students to demonstrate their learning in the theoretical biiochemistry taught in the course. The Practical Test in week 12 is designed to review the technical skill, knowledge and understanding acquired through the practical work . The laboratory reports will test the student’s ability to analyse biochemical findings, and to convey their understanding of these findings via written practical submissions. The assignment is designed to help students in course topic revision and understanding of all the topic material presented 
Students must achieve a passing mark in practical work for the course in order to be eligible for an examination grading.