Course Title: Rheology and Food Biophysics

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Rheology and Food Biophysics

Credit Points: 12.00


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ONPS2435

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2015

ONPS2448

City Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2015

ONPS2510

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2016

ONPS2510

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017

ONPS2521

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2016

ONPS2521

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017

Course Coordinator: Stefan Kasapis

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 99255244

Course Coordinator Email: stefan.kasapis@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Availability: by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

You will be in the final year of your Food Technology and Nutrition program.  Prerequisite capabilities are those developed either by completing Food Manufacture (ONPS2138) or a degree in Food Science and Technology.


Course Description

Today, in Australia and overseas a large number of the graduates of a Food Science and Technology program will be employed by the Food Industry in positions that require leadership and sound knowledge of developing on a scientific basis processed product formulations. Within this framework and to cope with the complexity of the task, the industry has adopted the so-called ’sophisticated biomaterial approach’ that requires understanding of the molecular interactions of biopolymers (proteins and polysaccharides), small polyhydroxyl compounds as co-solutes in the basic formulation (eg sugars) and their replacers (eg polydextrose), edible fats and oils and their replacement (eg dietary fibre), and counterions inducing gelation (eg salts).

Every year, a voluminous patented literature attempts to safeguard the interests of the industry in this area taking advantage of the aforementioned specialized knowledge and its implications for the chemistry, structure, functionality, texture and QDA sensory evaluation of added value commercial products. Based on this, the course aims to introduce level three undergraduate students to the language and principles of rheology and texture in model biomaterials and related industrial formulations. This will then be discussed in conjunction with the principles of biophysics in order to unveil the molecular mechanisms responsible for the observed rheological behaviour. Such a combined treatise should enhance your employment prospects and further support the Australian food industry and Food Sciences RMIT as a hub of innovation and quality control.

The content of the course has been identified to be of primary interest in the undergraduate food science and technology programme at RMIT University, and the lecturers of the course have drawn from their considerable expertise, working with the food industry or research institutes (eg Unilever, Nestle, Sanitarium Health Foods Company and CSIRO/FNS) to emphasize current issues and challenges pertaining to the subject.
 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

The course will develop high-performing team and leadership skills among students via formal instruction, participation in a task force and reflection on key components of the subject of rheology and food biophysics.

On completion of the course of the course you will be able to expertly negotiate the following course learning outcomes (CLOs)( PLOs are listed under Learning Outcomes):

  • Understand the major principles and types of rheology (linked to PLO-1)
  • Describe how rheology principles can be applied to give the required structure, texture and viscosity in processed food products (linked to PLO-2).
  • Discuss with confidence the molecular principles and mechanisms of food biophysics that dictate the observed rheological behaviour in solutions, gels and bioglasses (linked to PLO-2 and PLO-3).
  • Use the expertise acquired from the rheology and food biophysics teaching materials to critically evaluate new food product development within a technical context that emphasises textural consistency and mouthfeel (linked to PLO-3).
  • Communicate effectively as a professional scientist and food rheologist (linked to PLO-4 and PLO-5).


The course contributes to the development of the following Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs):

  • PLO-1   Demonstrate a coherent understanding of science
  • PLO-2   Exhibit breadth of scientific knowledge
  • PLO-3   Demonstrate problem solving
  • PLO-4   Demonstrate effective communication
  • PLO-5   Develop personal and professional responsibility


Overview of Learning Activities

The learning activities included in this course are:

  • Attendance at lectures where syllabus material will be presented and explained, and the subject will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples; 
  • Private study, working through the course as presented in lectures in preparation for tests and exams, and understanding experimental materials from practical sessions, hence gaining practice at preparing individual laboratory reports. 
  • Self directed literature search in the form of a group assignment, with groups sharing the results of their self directed learning through verbal presentations to peers and submission of a group report.


Overview of Learning Resources

Lecture notes taken in class along with handouts for group assignments, the laboratory manual, and online materials via my RMIT will provide you with the required information. You will be expected to undertake extra reading of references, journal articles and other recommended materials to supplement these resources.


Overview of Assessment

Assessment in this course will be based on the following four activities:  

  • Four individual laboratory reports (linked to PLO-3).
  • A group presentation and submission by the group of a project report (linked to PLO-4 and PLO-5).
  • A two-hour examination at the middle of the semester (linked to PLO-1 and PLO-2).
  • A two-hour examination at the end of the semester (linked to PLO-1 and PLO-2).