Course Title: Indigenous Policy

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Indigenous Policy

Credit Points: 12

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

POLI1101

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2016,
Sem 2 2018

POLI1101

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2017

POLI1102

City Campus

Undergraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2016

POLI1102

City Campus

Undergraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2017

Course Coordinator: Dr Suzi Hutchings

Course Coordinator Phone: 99251148

Course Coordinator Email: suzi.hutchings@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 8.11

Course Coordinator Availability: by email appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None. If this is the first course you have undertaken about Indigenous Australians at university there are several recommended pre-readings that will be useful to refer to before you start this course (see Learning resources below).


Course Description

This course provides you with a critical introduction to the impact of policy regimes on Indigenous Australians and will provide comparative international analysis. The course will explore three key areas of policy regarding Indigenous people as these have developed historically. The course will also review how these policy areas operate in contemporary politics and society. These three areas include: Law, Land and Sovereignty; Culture and Identity; Social Control and Indigenous protest.


Through a series of workshops on specific policy areas, this course will provide you with a capacity to understand, navigate and work within the relationships between governments, service providers and Indigenous people. You will develop knowledge of the history and politics behind policy making for Indigenous people in Australia and overseas, and you will develop a skill set which may assist you to direct Indigenous policy in the public, private and community sectors.


The course will enable you to critically engage with the major Indigenous policy debates and issues, such as native title and land rights. It will also assist you to develop anti-racist and decolonising practices which support Indigenous perspectives in policy making. The Course will further enhance your skills to critically analyse relevant international case studies and to introduce you to the global indigenous rights movement. 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Upon successful completion of this course you will be able to:

CLO 1: Critically analyse past and present relationships between Indigenous peoples and governments in the colonial process to contextualise and interpret Indigenous policy
CLO 2: Explain and critique public policy processes, policy theory and policy making practice in relation to Indigenous peoples
CLO 3: Identify key ideas, perspectives and approaches in policy making practice that support and promote Indigenous rights
CLO 4: Critically examine, and prepare policy documents and policy research
CLO 5: Provide policy advice and analysis which is clear and coherent, evidence based and soundly argued.

As a postgraduate student you will be required to demonstrate capacity for application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation of the features and challenges of Indigenous policy.


 

At the completion of this course, postgraduate students will be able to:

CLO 1: Critically analyse past and present relationships between Indigenous peoples and governments in the colonial process to contextualize and interpret Indigenous policy

CLO 2: Evaluate public policy processes, policy theory and policy making practice in relation to Indigenous peoples

CLO 3: Appraise key ideas, perspectives and approaches in policy making practice that support and promote Indigenous rights 

CLO 4: Evaluate and prepare policy documents and policy research

CLO 5: Provide policy advice and analysis which is clear and coherent, evidence based and persuasively argued.


 


Overview of Learning Activities

The course has been designed to include the following student learning experiences: lectures, experiential exercises, selected reading and practical work on policy analysis and critique and group presentations. You are expected to:

  • Become familiar with the course guide, and read and watch the recommended core readings/videos for each week’s workshop;
  • Attend workshops. The workshops are designed to be interactive and draw upon the wealth of knowledge and expertise within the student group. The workshops also provide a space for you and your fellow class members to work on your case study presentation. You are expected to attend all lectures and workshops;
  • View films/videos exploring specific topics as recommended in the course guide, or in the lectures and workshops, or by your lecturer and tutor;
  • Where possible engage with the broader Indigenous community by attending events and cultural activities that will further inform your knowledge.

 

 


Overview of Learning Resources

RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems. Weekly readings and additional materials, such as assessment guides, background material and documentaries, will be made available through the course site.

If this is the first course you have undertaken about Indigenous Australians at university the following resources will be useful before you start this course.

  • Neumeier, B. & Schaffer, K. (eds), (2014), Decolonizing the Landscape Indigenous Cultures in Australia, Editions Rodopi.
  • First Australians [documentary], dir: Rachel Perkins, (2008), Blackfella Films/Screen Australia – watch all 7 episodes, videos available online through the Library
  • Perkins, R., Langton., & Atkinson, W., First Australians [book], (2010), The Miegunyah Press, Carlton, Vic.

 

The prescribed text for the course is:

Watson, Irene, 2015, Aboriginal Peoples, Colonialism and International Law: raw law, Routledge.


Overview of Assessment

Assessment types may include written reports, case studies, and individual and group work.

 

 

 

Assessment task

Weighting

Linked Course learning outcomes

1. Policy paper/ Ministerial briefing (Written)

20%

CLO 2, CLO 3, CLO 4, CLO 5

2. Essay (Written)

40%

CLO 1, CLO 2, CLO 3, CLO 4

3. Case study presentation (Oral)

40%

CLO 1, CLO 2, CLO 3, CLO 4

 

Feedback will be provided throughout the semester in class through individual and group feedback on practical exercises and by individual consultation.