Course Title: Alternative Dispute Resolution

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Alternative Dispute Resolution

Credit Points: 12


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

HWSS2214

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Dr Rajesh Sharma

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2855

Course Coordinator Email: rajesh.sharma@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 37.04.16

Course Coordinator Availability: by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

Alternative dispute resolution has gained increased popularity in recent times due to congestion in the courts, delays in litigation and rising legal costs. This course will familiarise you with theories, concepts and skills for managing conflict and resolving disputes. You will explore conflict theory and responses to conflict in a variety of settings. These will include: local planning and community disputes, and workplace and family conflict.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Critically appraise the knowledge, values and skills required for effective conflict management and resolution;
  • Identify and justify appropriate and inappropriate approaches to dispute resolution;
  • Evaluate and differentiate between conciliation, arbitration, negotiation, mediation and other approaches to conflict management and resolution;
  • Critically analyse issues of power related to: gender, race, culture, ethnicity, ability, class, age and sexual preference;
  • Critically reflect on current political, social and economic debates about the use of alternative dispute resolution,
  • Hypothesise ethical issues and dilemmas in conflict resolution


Program Learning Outcomes
In this course you will develop the following program learning outcomes:

  • Critically analyse, synthesise and reflect on advanced theories, principles, philosophies in the justice sector, both locally and globally, to extend and challenge knowledge and practice
  • Use a range of communication, conflict management and teamwork skills to work productively with a diverse range of people in justice environments
  • Use appropriate ethical ideas and reflective practice skills in addressing situations and problems in justice settings demonstrating cultural, social and environmental sensitivity

     


Through a structured series of problems involving the analysis of theoretical concepts, case study, and formal research, students in the course will be introduced to the philosophy and practice of the principal ADR processes.

 

Through the course you can expect to:

  1. become familiar with the identification, description and analysis of ADR processes;
  2. identify appropriate approaches to formal dispute resolution through a range of situations including the workplace, the neighbourhood, the family and domestic context, environmental context, business, construction and urban planning; and,
  3. enhance communication skills.

 


At the end of this course you will be able to:

  1. have a good understanding of the knowledge, values and skills required for effective conflict management and resolution;
  2. identify appropriate approaches to dispute resolution, differentiate between conciliation, arbitration, negotiation, mediation and other approaches to conflict management and resolution;
  3. identify issues of power related to: gender, race, culture, ethnicity, ability, class, age and sexual preference;
  4. demonstrate familiarity with current political, social and economic debates about the use of ADR, and have developed an awareness of the ethical issues and dilemmas in conflict resolution; and,
  5. have further developed your research and writing skills through independent research.


Overview of Learning Activities

This course is generally delivered in a face-to-face mode with a blend of learning activities, which include moot courts as part of a team, lectures, seminars, problem solving, guest speakers, presentations, case studies, videos, online activities, and student lead discussions. The course may be delivered online.


Overview of Learning Resources

RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems. There may be a prescribed text for this course.


Overview of Assessment

You will be assessed on how well you meet the course’s learning outcomes and on your development against the program capabilities. Assessment may include examinations, tests and quizzes, presentations, team work, problem solving tasks, role playing, and essay writing. Feedback will be given on all assessment tasks.

 

  • If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.
  • A student charter http://www.rmit.edu.au/about/studentcharter summarises your responsibilities as an RMIT student as well as those of your teachers.
  • Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions which are available for review online: http://www.rmit.edu.au/policies/academic#assessment