Course Title: Apply an understanding of nutritional biochemistry

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term2 2011

Course Code: ONPS5248

Course Title: Apply an understanding of nutritional biochemistry

School: 155T Vocational Health and Sciences

Campus: City Campus

Program: C5184 - Diploma of Food Science & Technology

Course Contact: Veluppillai Packiyasothy

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4932

Course Contact Email: veluppillai.packiyasothy@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

Nominal Hours: 45

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

VPB036 - Apply chemistry knowledge and laboratory practices in the workplace,
VPB074 - Identify the biochemical properties of food
 

Course Description

This unit covers the skills and knowledge required to apply human nutrition in terms of biochemical processes based on relevant anatomy, physiology and biochemical processes.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

VBP084 Apply an understanding of nutritional biochemistry

Element:

1. Identify the major chemical constituents of foods.

Performance Criteria:

1.1 The major chemical constituents of foods and food
products are identified.
1.2 The key structural differences between:
• proteins
• carbohydrates
• lipids
• dietary fibre
• vitamins and ‘vitamin-like compounds’
are defined

Element:

2. Evaluate, in biochemical terms, the nutritional importance of proteins.

Performance Criteria:

2.1 Foods and food products rich in proteins, from animal and
vegetable sources, are identified.
2.2 Link between the structure and function of proteins is
recognized.
2.3 Essential and non-essential amino acids are identified.
2.4 Proteins are evaluated based on their constituent essential
and non-essential amino acids.
2.5 Digestive processes related to proteins, polypeptides and
amino acids are identified.
2.6 Utilization of proteins by the human body is determined.
2.7 Factors affecting protein requirements in humans are
evaluated.
2.8 Physiological effects of excessive or deficient intakes of
protein are assessed

Element:

3. Evaluate, in biochemical terms, the nutritional importance of carbohydrates.

Performance Criteria:

3.1 Forms and food sources of dietary carbohydrates are
identified.
3.2 Carbohydrate foods are differentiated based on their
glycaemic index.
3.3 Process of digestion of dietary carbohydrates is identified.
3.4 Absorption and transport processes of monosaccharides,
disaccharides and polysaccharides is determined.
3.5 Carbohydrate metabolism, in biochemical terms, is analysed.
3.6 Regulation of blood glucose is interpreted.
3.7 Utilization of carbohydrates by the human body is
determined.
3.8 Factors affecting carbohydrate requirements in humans are
evaluated.
3.9 Physiological effects of excessive or deficient intakes of
carbohydrates are assessed.

Element:

4. Establish, using biochemical terms, the nutritional importance of dietary fibre.

Performance Criteria:

4.1 Forms and food sources of dietary fibre are determined.
4.2 Role of dietary fibre in the physiology of digestion is
evaluated.
4.3 Protective effects of dietary fibre in the prevention of disease
are assessed.
4.4 Physiological effects of excessive or deficient intakes of
dietary fibre are assessed.

Element:

5. Establish, in biochemical terms, the nutritional importance of lipids and related substances.

Performance Criteria:

5.1 Various classes of dietary lipids, essential fatty acids and
cholesterol are identified.
5.2 Current patterns of fatty acid intake in affluent populations,
and traditional communities, are assessed.
5.3 Digestive processes related to lipids are identified.
5.4 Physiological effects of the various categories of dietary lipids
are assessed based on biochemistry.
5.5 Parameters of cholesterol function and metabolism are
identified.
5.6 Utilisation of lipids and cholesterol by the human body is
determined.
5.7 Physiological effects of excessive or deficient intakes of
dietary lipids are assessed.

Element:

6. Distinguish between the key elements of energy metabolism.

Performance Criteria:

6.1 The body’s requirement for energy, and the factors affecting
this requirement, is determined.
6.2 The release of energy from food by oxidative metabolic
processes is interpreted.
6.3 Food energy content of various foods and macronutrients is
sourced.
6.4 Methods by which the human body’s energy expenditure may
be measured are determined.
6.5 Utilisation of energy by the human body is investigated.

Element:

7. Establish, in biochemical terms, the nutritional importance of vitamins and ‘vitamin-like compounds’.

Performance Criteria:

7.1 Vitamins and ‘vitamin-like substances’ are identified.
7.2 Food sources of the various vitamins are established.
7.3 Food sources of the various ‘vitamin-like’ substances are
established.
7.4 Process of digestion and absorption of vitamins is identified.
7.5 Biochemical functions of each of the vitamins and ‘vitaminlike
compounds’ is determined.
7.6 Utilisation of vitamins and ‘vitamin-like compounds’ by the
human body is determined.
7.7 Effects of deficiencies and toxicities of vitamins and ‘vitaminlike
compounds’ on the human body is assessed.

Element:

8. Establish, in biochemical terms, the nutritional value of minerals.

Performance Criteria:

8.1 Biochemical roles fulfilled by minerals are determined.
8.2 Biochemical and metabolic factors controlling the balance
between the intake and excretion of minerals are identified.
8.3 Food sources of minerals are determined.
8.4 Digestion, absorption and transport of minerals in the human
body is determined.
8.5 Utilisation of minerals by the human body is determined.
8.6 Physiological effects of excessive or deficient intakes of
minerals are assessed

Element:

9. Evaluate the biochemical and physiological processes involving water

Performance Criteria:

9.1 The main fluid types in the body are categorised.
9.2 Digestion, absorption, transport and excretion of water in the
human body is determined.
9.3 The role of dissolved solutes in the human body is
established.
9.4 The metabolism of the key electrolytes in body fluids is
established.


Learning Outcomes


On completion of this unit  students will be able to

  • Identify the chemical constituentsof foods
  • Distinguish between the key elements of energy metabolism.
  •  Understand the nutritional importance of lipids and related substances, proteins, carbohydrates, dietaryfibre, vitamins and vitamin-like substances, minerals and water 
  • Understand the biochemical and physiological processes involving water
    .
     


Details of Learning Activities

Face-to-face lectures

Videos

Laboratory activities

Class activities and worksheets

Research activities


Teaching Schedule

Week  1:   Major Chemical constituents of foods and food products are  identified.     Revision of Digestive System,    Review of the structures of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, dietary fibre, vitamins and vitamin-like compounds

Week 2.  Nutritional importance of Proteins in biochemical terms 

Week 3.  Nutritional Importance of carbohydrates in biochemical terms

Week 4:  Nutritional importance of Dietary fibre  

Week 5;  Nutritional importance of lipids and related substances in biochemical terms

Week 6. Nutritional importance of vitamins and vitamin-like substances

Week 7;  Nutritional importance of minerals

Biochemical and Physiological processes involving water  

Week 8. Energy Metabolism

Week 9.  Revision


End of Semester exam week:  exam


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts

Food and Nutrition 2nd ed       Mark Wahlqvist


References

Understanding Nutrition         Ellie Whitney  and Sharon Rady Rolfes


Other Resources

DVD      Carbohydrates
DVD      Proteins
Catalyst off air recording           Stomach and intestines
Catalyst -offair recording   Diabetes
DVD   Nutrients- their interactions
Video  - Cell Metabolism


Overview of Assessment

Assessment for this course consists of:


• Class activities
• Research tasks/activity sheets/worksheets/presentation
. Practical activities and reports
.Short tests/quizzes
• Exam
 


Assessment Tasks

Exam          40%

Practical Activities and Reports        20%

Worksheets, video question sheets, homework sheets, quizzes     - 40%


Assessment Matrix

element12345678
Theory classesx     x    x   x    x   x    x   x   
Practical Activities x   x x
Class/research activitiesxxxxxxxx

Other Information

The 45 hours allowed for this unit are allocated as follows

Class Theory       24 hours

Practical Activities    6 hours

Research Tasks/ Activity Sheets   10 hours

Writing up practical Reports    3 hours

Exam             2 hours

Course Overview: Access Course Overview