Course Title: Apply thermodynamic principles in engineering

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term1 2014

Course Code: MIET6044

Course Title: Apply thermodynamic principles in engineering

School: 130T Vocational Engineering

Campus: City Campus

Program: C6069 - Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology

Course Contact: Program Manager

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4468

Course Contact Email: engineering-tafe@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

Mr. Leon Mattatia
Tel: +61 3 99254668
Email: leon.mattatia@rmit.edu.au

Nominal Hours: 80

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

None; It is recommended that learners attempting this unit have a thorough knowledge of elementary Trigonometry & Algebra, as required in VBP228 Apply Mathematical solutions to engineering problems or equivalent.

Course Description

This unit of competency sets out the knowledge and skills required to apply thermodynamic principles in engineering. This includes concepts, forms and principles and performing relevant calculations with respect to thermodynamics.  No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication. However, practice in this unit is subject to regulations directly related to occupational health and safety and where applicable contracts of training such as apprenticeships and traineeships.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

VBP277 Apply thermodynamic principles in engineering

Element:

1. Apply thermodynamic principles to plan, conduct, or complete engineering tasks

Performance Criteria:

1.1 OH&S and environmental requirements for a given work area are obtained and understood.
1.2 Applications of thermodynamics to engineering activities can be given.
1.3 Thermodynamic units, terms and symbols are recognised and used correctly.
1.4 Thermodynamic charts and diagrams are interpreted and the given process explained to appropriate personnel..
1.5 Concepts/principles of thermodynamic energy are applied as appropriate to the given engineering task.
1.6 Potential hazards are identified and reported according to enterprise procedures.
1.7 Safety and risk control measures are applied when working with thermodynamic applications.
 

Element:

2. Determine thermodynamic requirements when planning engineering tasks

Performance Criteria:

2.1 OH&S requirements for carrying out the work are followed.
2.2 Relevant thermodynamic application is identified for the given engineering task.
2.3 Measurements and calculations relevant to the thermodynamic application are performed and interpreted correctly.
2.4 Thermodynamic requirements for the engineering task are confirmed as required with appropriate personnel.
2.5 Resources and equipment needed for the task are obtained in accordance with enterprise procedures and checked for correct operation and safety.
2.6 Appropriate measurement devices are used to measure thermodynamic properties.
2.7 Unexpected situations are resolved with appropriate personnel, and in accordance with enterprise procedures.

Element:

3. Operate and test equipment and devices employing various sources of energy

Performance Criteria:

3.1 Occupational health & safety requirements, relevant Australian Standards, codes of practice, manufacturers specifications, environmental requirements and enterprise procedures are identified and adhered to.
3.2 Equipment and devices are operated safely and only for the purpose intended according to manufacturers’ operating instructions, specifications and any specific safety requirements.
3.3 Routine maintenance and fault tracing on components and systems is performed in a safe manner.


Learning Outcomes


N/A.


Details of Learning Activities

Students will participate in a variety of teaching methods including: lectures, tutorials,practicals, class discussion, seminar presentations, group/individual work on projects, audio-visual presentations, site visits, and interaction with individuals and groups within the Thermodynamics area.
 


Teaching Schedule

 

The proposed teaching schedule for this competency is detailed below:

WeekTopics DeliveredElements/Performance Criteria
1Introduction and Overview of Course, Textbooks, Assessment1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6 and 1.7
2

Energy & Humanity:

Discussion of various types of energy and their uses and implications for sustainabilty. Heat Engines, Solar Energy, Wind and Wave Energy, Hydroelectric Power, Nuclear Energy, Tidal Energy, Geothermal Energy, Fossil Fuels, etc

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
3

Basic Thermodynamic concepts:

The nature of Matter, Properties and processes, Mass, Volume, Density, Relative Density, Specific Volume, Force, Weight, Pressure, Temperature and Heat

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
4

Energy:

Law of Conservation of Energy (The First Law of Thermodynamics), Types of energy - Mechanical, Heat, Chemical, Internal, Electrical, Nuclear. Discussion of Potential Energy, Kinetic Energy, Work, relationship between Pressure & Volume, Power

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
5

Temperature & Heat:

Concepts of Sensible and Latent Heat, Specific Heat Capacity - Practical problem solving involving calculation of heat required to be added/removed to increase/decrease the temperature or change the phase of a substance (e.g. Ice/Water/Steam). 

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
6

Energy transfer in closed and open systems:

Discussion of the differences between Closed and Open Thermodynamic Systems in terms of Heat, Work and Mass transfer.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
7

Closed Thermodynamic Systems:

Solution of practical engineering problems. Systems with no phase change and systems involving phase change(s).

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
8

Closed Thermodynamic Systems (continued):

Solution of further practical engineering problems. Bomb Calorimeter problems.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
9

Open Thermodynamic Systems:

Solution of practical engineering problems. Mass and Volumetric flow rates, Continuity Equation, Steady Flow Energy Equation

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
10

Open Thermodynamic Systems (continued):

Solution of practical engineering problems. Mass and Volumetric flow rates, Continuity Equation, Steady Flow Energy Equation.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
11

Open Thermodynamic Systems (continued):

Solution of practical engineering problems involving application to Steam Generators (Boilers), Turbines, Compressors and Heat Exchangers

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
12

Gases:

Definition of an Ideal Gas. Discussion of attributes of perfect or Ideal gases compared to non-ideal (real) gases, e.g. Steam. Application of general ideal gas equations to engineering problems

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
13

Gases:

Specific Heat Capacity of a gas. Heat and Work transfer in a gas using Non-Flow and Steady Flow Energy equation.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
14

Gas Processes:

Relationship between Pressure, Temperature and Volume in Isobaric, Isothermal, Adiabatic (Isentropic) and Polytropic gas processes 

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
15

Gas Processes (continued): Solution of practical engineering problems involving various, gas processes. 

Assignment 1 (Minor) - Due

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
16

Heat Engines:

Defintion of a Heat Engine. Concept of a Heat source and a Heat Sink, Open and Closed Engine Cycles, Continuous and Intermittent Combustion, Internal and External Combustion

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
17

Heat Engine Cycles (continued):

Carnot Cycle, Stirling Cycle, Otto Cycle, Diesel Cycle. Solution of practical engineering problems involving Heat, Work, Power and Efficiency (Thermal and Mechanical).

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
18Laboratory Practical2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
19

Heat Transfer:

Modes of Heat Transfer - Conduction, Convection & Radiation (Discussion of heat transfer mechanisms), Basic heat transfer equation

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
20

Heat Transfer (continued):

Conduction through single and composite flat plates. Radial conduction in thin -walled and lagged pipes. Solution of practical engineering problemsinvolving Conductive Heat Transfer.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
21

Heat Transfer (continued):

Convection - Free and Forced Convection. Solution of practical engineering problems involving Convective Heat Transfer. Heat Exchangers.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
22

Heat Transfer (continued)

Radiation. Solution of practical engineering problems involving Radiant Heat Transfer. Combination of Conduction, Convection and Radiation

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
22

Combustion of Fuels:

Air-Fuel Ratio, Energy available from combustion processes (Calorific Value). Solution of simple practical engineering problems involving combustion of fuels.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
23

Combustion of Fuels (continued):

Types of Fuels - Solid, Liquid and Gaseous. Emissions & Pollution. Combustion Equations. Gravimetric analysis of combustion (forward and reverse direction). Solution of practical problems involving combustion of fuels.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
24

Steam/Water Systems:

Saturation temperature and Pressure, Heat transfer from water/steam, Temperature vs Specific Enthalpy diagram, Use of Steam Tables. Solution of practical engineering applications of steam/water systems.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
25

Steam/Water Systems (continued):

Steam Generators (Boilers), Throttling processes, Mixing of Steam and water. Heat Exchangers, Steam/hot water plant for heating applications. Solution of practical engineering applications of steam/water systems

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
26

Steam/Water Systems (continued):

Analysis of Steam plant for power production. Determination of Power output, Rate of Heat rejection and thermal/mechanical efficiency of Steam plant operating on basic Rankine Cycle.Solution of practical engineering applications involving steam power plant

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
27

Steam/Water Systems (continued):

Solution of further practical engineering applications involving steam power plant. Improvement of steam plant efficiency by insertion of superheat and reheat process and low pressure turbines and economisers

Assignment 2 (Major) - Due

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
28

Refrigeration/heat pump:

Refrigeration terms and principles, Principles of Vapour Compression mechanical refrigeration, Refrigerant properties, the Pressure vs Enthalpy Diagram.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
 

Refrigeration/heat pump (continued):

The ideal basic Refrigeration Cycle - theoretical analysis, Maximum efficiency of refrigeration plant,

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
31

Refrigeration/heat pump (continued):

Modifications to basic vapour-compression cycle to incorporate practical considerations, Heat Pump, other refrigeration systems.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
32

Basic Air-Conditioning:

Basic Concepts, Psychrometric Chart, Sensible cooling and heating, Adiabatic and non-adiabatic humidification, Chemical dehumidification

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
33

Basic Air-Conditioning (continued):

Mixing processes, Series processes, Evaporative Cooling Towers, Airconditioning Loads, Air Distribution, Analysis of complete airconditioning system.

2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
34Revision1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
35Revision1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3
36Final Test1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 1.4, 1.5, 1.6, 1.7, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 2.5, 2.6, 2.7, 3.1, 3.2 and 3.3


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts

1. Roger Kinsky, Thermodynamics and Fluid Mechanics An Introduction

2. Roger Kinsky, Thermodynamics Advanced Applications

3. Fundamentals of Themal-Fluid Sciences Y A Cengel, J M Cimbala & R H Turner, 4th edition,


References

4. Principles of Engineering Thermodynamics, SI Version, Michael J. Moran, Howard N. Shapiro, Daisie D. Boettner, Margaret B. Bailey, 7th edition

5. Applied Thermodynamics for Engineering Technologists, Eastop & McKonkey


Other Resources

Notes provided during class & resource material including references to videos on the Student Drive and the Learning Hub
 


Overview of Assessment

Assessment may incorporate a variety of methods including written/oral activities and demonstration of practical skills to the relevant industry standards.

 Participants are advised that they are likely to be asked to personally demonstrate their assessment activities to their teacher/assessor.

 

 Feedback will be provided throught the course

Evidence can be gathered through a variety of ways including:
observation of processes and procedures;
oral and/or written questioning on required knowledge and skills;
testimony from supervisors, colleagues, clients and/or other appropriate
persons;
inspection of the final product or outcome;
a portfolio of documentary evidence

Graded Assessment out of 100 Marks will be based on the results obtained for Assignments/Practical Reports/Unit Tests.
Students must gain a pass in ALL forms of assessment in order to gain this competency.
 


Assessment Tasks

 

The assessment for this subject will consist of:

1. Assignment 1 (Minor) - 20%

2. Assignment 2 (Major) - 30%

3. Lab practical report - 10%

4. Final test - 40%


Competency requirements: To be deemed competent students must satisfactorily demonstrate competence in all elements listed above. Assessment methods have been designed to measure achievement of each competency in a flexible manner over multiple tasks.
 

Students are advised that they will be asked to demonstrate their competence per student assignments and test which will be used to assess their competence. All assessments for this course must be successfully completed to achieve a CA (Competency Achieved) grade. Only if Competency is achieved will a graded result be given using the coding choices listed below:


80 - 100: CHD - Competent with High Distinction
70 - 79: CDI - Competent with Distinction
60 - 69: CC - Competent with Credit
50 - 59: CAG - Competency Achieved - Graded
0 - 49: NYC - Not Yet Competent
DNS - Did Not Submit for Assessment
 


Assessment Matrix

Assessment                               Elements                        Performance Criteria                                  
Assignment 1 (Minor)1-31.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4,2.5,2.6,2.7,3.1,3.2,3.3
Assignment 2 (Major)1-31.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4,2.5,2.6,2.7,3.1,3.2,3.3
Lab practical report1-31.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4,2.5,2.6,2.7,3.1,3.2,3.3
Final test1-3

1.1,1.2,1.3,1.4,1.5,1.6,1.7,2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4,2.5,2.6,2.7,3.1,3.2,3.3

Other Information

Student directed hours involve completing activities such as reading online resources, project work, individual student-teacher course-related consultation. Students are required to self-study the learning materials and complete the assigned out of class activities for the scheduled non-teaching hours. The estimated time is 30 hours outside the class time.

Study and Learning Support:

Study and Learning Centre (SLC) provides free learning and academic development advice to you. Services offered by SLC to support your numeracy and literacy skills are:

- Assignment writing, thesis writing and study skills advice
- Maths and science developmental support and advice
- English language development

Please refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/studyandlearningcentre to find more information about Study and learning Support.

Disability Liaison Unit:

If you are suffering from long-term medical condition or disability, you should contact Disability Liaison Unit to seek advice and support to complete your studies.

Please refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/disability to find more information about services offered by Disability Liaison Unit.

Late Submission:

If you require an Extension of Submittable Work (assignments, reports or project work etc.) for 7 calendar days or less (from the original due date) and have valid reasons, you must complete and lodge an Application for Extension of Submittable Work (7 Calendar Days or less) form and lodge it with the Senior Educator/ Program Manager.

The application must be lodged no later than one working day before the official due date. You will be notified within no more than 2 working days of the date of lodgement as to whether the extension has been granted.

If you seek an Extension of Submittable Work for more than 7 calendar days (from the original due date) must lodge an Application for Special Consideration form under the provisions of the Special Consideration Policy, preferably prior to, but no later than 2 working days after the official due date.

Submittable Work (assignments, reports or project work etc.) submitted late without approval of an extension will not be accepted or marked.

Special Consideration:

Please refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/students/specialconsideration to find more information about special consideration.

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is a form of cheating and it is very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University.

Please refer: www.rmit.edu.au/academicintegrity to find more information about plagiarism.

Email Communication:

All email communications will be sent to your RMIT email address and you must regularly check your RMIT emails.
 

Course Overview: Access Course Overview