Course Title: Communicate and apply standard industry procedures and policies in an engineering design office

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term2 2013

Course Code: CIVE5654

Course Title: Communicate and apply standard industry procedures and policies in an engineering design office

School: 130T Vocational Engineering

Campus: City Campus

Program: C6093 - Advanced Diploma of Engineering Design

Course Contact: Program Manager

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4468

Course Contact Email: engineering-tafe@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

A.S. (Ahmet) Ertuncay. Program Manager.
School of Engineering (TAFE)
Civil Operations
Tel : (03) 9925 8375
Fax : (03) 9925 4377
e-mail ahmet.ertuncay@rmit.edu.au

W.R. (Bill) Harding, Teacher
School of Engineering (TAFE)
Civil Operations
Tel. 9925 4443
Fax. 9925 4377
e-mail: bill.harding@rmit.edu.au  
 

Nominal Hours: 60

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

Nil

Course Description

This unit covers the competency to enter an engineering design office with knowledge of the engineering disciplines, the contribution of engineering to society, basic structures, awards and work practices, including quality systems, risk management and the application of Occupational Health, Safety and Welfare OHS&W legislation. The competency includes communication through writing technical reports and making short oral presentations.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

EDX010B Communicate and apply standard industry procedures and policies in an engineering design office

Element:

1. Apply knowledge of the different engineering disciplines and the impact of engineering on society.

Performance Criteria:

1.1 The term ‘engineering’ can be defined and explained.
1.2 The impact of engineering on society can be explained and examples given.
1.3 The main engineering disciplines can be named and the basic range of activities for each explained.
1.4 The types of design and drawings carried out in the main engineering disciplines can be named, described and recognised.

Element:

2.Apply knowledge of the types of engineering occupations and employment, education, training and retraining requirements for a engineering design office.

Performance Criteria:

2.1 The role and functions of professional engineers, engineering associates, technical officers, technicians, design drafters, detail drafters and associated paraprofessional engineering occupations can be explained.
2.2 The differences between the training and education requirements for professional engineers, paraprofessional technicians/technical officers and tradespersons can be explained.
2.3 The education and industry training structures and opportunities can be described.
2.4 The nature, typical content and application of industrial awards in the Australian engineering workplace can be explained.
2.5 Trade union structures and membership in the engineering industries can be described.
 

Element:

3. Participate in quality improvement activities.

Performance Criteria:

3.1 The difference between Quality Control and Quality
Assurance can be explained.
3.2 The use of the PDCA cycle as a framework for quality improvement can be described.
3.3 At least two types of quality improvement teams can be described.
3.4 Contribution is made to a brainstorming session on a quality issue and a cause and effect diagram constructed from the session outcomes.
3.5 A flow chart can be drawn for a simple process.
3.6 An explanation of how the techniques and charts can help in quality improvement can be given.
3.7 The intent of the ISO9000 series of standards for quality management systems can be explained.
3.8 The types of documentation required to operate a quality management system can be described.
3.9 The use of quality system procedures and work instructions in the workplace can be explained.
3.10 The key links between a quality system and quality improvement can be described.
3.11 The impact of TQM on Australian competitiveness in the world market can be discussed.

Element:

4. Apply the legislative requirements of Occupational Health, Safety & Welfare.

Performance Criteria:

4.1 The relationship between Worksafe Australia and individual State and Territory Health and Safety Commissions can be explained so that their jurisdiction is clearly defined.
4.2 The meaning and legal standing of Acts, Regulations, Codes of Practice, Australian Standards can be defined and examples given which impact on a design office job.
4.3 The steps in a hazard control programme can be outlined.
4.4 The significance of the hazard control hierarchy can be described and an example of each element in the hierarchy can be identified in a workplace inspection.
4.5 The conditions under which personal protective apparel/equipment must be used can be described.
4.6 Items necessary for the safe performance of a particular engineering job can be selected.
4.7 A description is given of the responsibilities of employers and employees in maintaining a healthy and safe workplace for a particular engineering workplace.
4.8 A flow chart is drawn of the steps involved in resolving health and safety issues at a place of employment.
4.9 An outline is given of the components of a workplace health and safety programme including the role of training.

Element:

5. Conduct a workplace hazard audit.

Performance Criteria:

5.1 A description is given of a situation under which a given hazard presents a risk to safety and/or health.
5.2 Acute and chronic hazards present in a chosen occupation are identified.
5.3 A description is given of common techniques for hazard identification in industry.
5.4 A workplace “Hazard Audit” is conducted using a standard proforma.

Element:

6. Apply knowledge of risk management concepts.

Performance Criteria:

6.1 The need for risk management in the contemporary industrial and business climate can be explained.
6.2 The concept of risk management can be explained.
6.3 An understanding of risk management terminology is demonstrated.
6.4 The main elements of the risk management process as described in AS/NZS 4360 can be listed and a brief description given.
6.5 Typical risk management documentation can be listed and described.

Element:

7. Write a technical document .

Performance Criteria:

7.1 The document’s purpose, context, scope and method of organization are stated explicitly.
7.2 The level of content is appropriate to the audience.
7.3 Information is complete and accurate.
7.4 Information is logically sequenced, in accordance with the reader’s needs, and easily accessible.
7.5 Technical terminology is used correctly and appropriately.
7.6 Headings, sub-headings, lists and instructional steps – where used are consistent in form.
7.7 Appropriate linking and summary statements are included where relevant.
7.8 Graphics and related text are clearly integrated.
7.9 A writing style is used whish is concise, precise, unambiguous, consistent in register and coherent.
7.10 Format, length and layout are appropriate to the purpose.

Element:

8. Make an oral presentation.

Performance Criteria:

8.1 The topic of the presentation is briefly outlined.
8.2 The presentation is organised with the material presented in a logical fashion.
8.3 Appropriate presentation aids are used effectively.
8.4 Annunciation is clear and audible.
8.5 The presentation is timed appropriately.


Learning Outcomes


Refer to Learning Package on the Learning Hub.


Details of Learning Activities

Teacher Directed:
• Teacher–led face to face lectures for each element in designated areas of underpinning knowledge, including workplace scenarios and the use of overheads, videos and notes from local web page and covering:
• Engineering Organisations and their structure
• Quality Concepts and procedures within the workplace
• Occupational Health and safety in the workplace
• Writing technical reports for the engineering workplace.

Student-based learning activities
• Participate in individual or small group research related to an engineering company and including:
• Engineering disciplines
• Engineering Institutes & Associations.
• Engineering industrial awards
• Education and qualifications
• Design office structure
• Design office activities
• Participate in and OH&S induction program covering issues concerning RMIT and the workplace training facilities, conducted by the school.
• Using workplace scenarios, participate in simulations/role plays/case studies dealing with:
• OH&S procedures and covering the legal requirements, preventative nature of OH&S, workplace audits, employee/employer responsibilities, a health and safety program and risk management.
• Quality systems
• Quality control
• Quality Measurement testing
• Quality improvement and statistical techniques.
• preparation of written technical engineering reports

Group-based:
• Participate in individual or small group research using Self Help Questions/Answers for each element in designated areas of underpinning knowledge, accessed via local web site for this unit.
 


Teaching Schedule

See Online Learning Hub via MyRMIT (Blackboard) for details of weekly schedule.
Refer also to the Learning Guide/Package available on the Blackboard.


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts

Victorian Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004


References

George, C & Cole, K (1992) Supervision in Action – The Art of Managing 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall, Sydney.
Kirby, R, Withington, S, Darling, A, and Kilgour, F,(1990) Engineering in History Dover Pub. New York. 1956 version.
Scott, J (1993) Dictionary of Civil Engineering 4th ed. Chapman & Hall, New York.
Maclean, J and Scott, J (1993) Dictionary of Building 4th ed., Penguin Books.
Shaw, J, Chase, R, Moore, L, and Toohey, J, (1994) Occupational Health and Safety – Best Management Practice, Harcourt Brace, Sydney.
Guide to the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
Summary of the Occupational Health and Safety Act 2004
Code of Practice for Plant
Code of Practice for Prevention of Falls in general Construction
Issue Resolution Regulations
Manual Handling Regulations
 

ISO Standards for Quality ISO 9000-2000 Series
Williams, R.L. (1994), Essentials of Total Quality Management, AMACOM, USA
Cortada, J & Woods, J 1995, Quality Terms and Concepts, McGraw-Hill Inc. New York.
Ishikawa, K (1994) Guide to Quality Control, 12th ed., Nordica Int. Ltd.
Kruithof, J & Ryall, J (1994) The Quality Standards Handbook, Information Aust. (Aust. Print Group)
George, C & Cole, K (1992) Supervision in Action – The Art of Managing 3rd Ed. Prentice Hall, Sydney.
Juran, J (1998) Quality Control Handbook, 5th ed. McGaw-Hill, New York
Fox, R (1991) Making Quality Happen, McGraw-Hill, Sydney.
Feigenbaum, AV (1991) Total Quality Control, 3rd ed. McGraw-Hill, New York.
 

Ellyard, S & Taylor, P (2005), Communication for IT, 2nd ed., (Access Series) TAFE NSW, McGraw Hill, North Ryde, NSW
Eunson, B (1994), Writing and presenting reports, (The communication skills series) John Wiley & Sons, Milton, QLD
Sorby, S & Bulleit, W (2006), An Engineer‘s Guide to technical Communication, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
Ellyard, S, Koritschoner, E & Braham, B (2002), Communication for IT, (Access series) TAFE NSW, McGraw-Hill, North Ryde, NSW
Websites:
ACTU: www.actu.asn.au
CFMEU: www.cfmeu.asn.au
Engineers Australia: www.engineersaustralia.org.au
Victorian Trades Hall Council: www.vthc.org.au
Victorian Parliamentary web site, www.dms.dpc.vic.gov.au
WorkSafe web site, www.worksafe.vic.gov.au
Safety Engineering, www.safteng.net
OH&S World Wide, www.ohs.com
Quality Control Charts www.statsoft.com/textbook/stquacon.html
Continuous Quality Improvement Server (Educational) go to Tutorials
http://deming.eng.clemson.edu/
Quality Control (also check out the external links from this site)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quality_control
 


Other Resources


Overview of Assessment

Assessment are conducted in both theoretical and practical aspects of the course according to the performance criteria set out in the National Training Package. Students are required to undertake summative assessments that bring together knowledge and skills. To successfully complete this course you will be required to demonstrate competency in each assessment tasks detailed under the Assessment Task Section.

Your assessment for this course will be marked using the following table:

NYC (<50%) Not Yet Competent

CAG (50-59%) Competent - Pass

CC (60-69%) Competent - Credit

CDI (70-79%) Competent - Distinction

CHD (80-100%) Competent - High Distinction


Assessment Tasks

Test: Engineering Organisations
Your course coordinator/tutor will give you specific test instructions for the semester of your study, including:
• Date and time of test
• Any other specific requirements
However, it is expected the test will have the following:
o Short answer questions
o True and false
o Multiple choice
o Essay
• 1 ½ hours duration.
This test has a pass grade of 50% and will contribute 10% of the final overall mark. Like all assessments within this course, this assessment task must be passed in order to meet the requirements of this course.

Test: Occupational Health & Safety
Your course coordinator/tutor will give you specific test instructions for the semester of your study, including:
• Date and time of test
• Any other specific requirements
However, it is expected the test will have the following:
o True or false questions
o Multiple choice questions
o Short answer questions
o Essay
• Open book test using the Victorian OH&S Act 2000
• 1 ½ hours duration.

This test has a pass grade of 70% and will contribute 15% of the final overall mark. Like all assessments within this course, this assessment task must be passed in order to meet the requirements of this course.

Test: Quality Systems
Your course coordinator/tutor will give you specific test instructions for the semester of your study, including:
• Date and time of test
• Any other specific requirements
However, it is expected the test will have the following:
o True or false questions
o Short answer questions
o True and false
o Multiple choice questions
o Essay
• 1 ½ hours duration.

This test has a pass grade of 50% and will contribute 10% of the final overall mark. Like all assessments within this course, this assessment task must be passed in order to meet the requirements of this course.

Written report:
Covering - Engineering Organisations, Occupational Health & Safety, Quality Systems and Technical report writing.
This report features all major topic areas of this course.
The report is in two parts:
• consisting of a report regarding the running of an engineering company, and
• secondly a report regarding an accident occurring at the site of a project run by the company.

This report has a pass grade of 50% and will contribute 40% of the final overall mark. Like all assessments within this course, this assessment task must be passed in order to meet the requirements of this course.

Oral presentation:
Covering the major topic areas of: Occupational Health & Safety, and Delivering an Oral presentation.
Your course coordinator/tutor will give you specific test instructions for the semester of your study, including:
• Date and time of test
• Any other specific requirements
The oral presentation consists of the findings of an investigation into the accident at the project site (part two of the report) being presented to an “Investigating Commissioner”

This oral presentation has a pass grade of 50% and will contribute 25% of the final overall mark. Like all assessments within this course, this assessment task must be passed in order to meet the requirements of this course.
 


Assessment Matrix

 Element Covered Assessment Task Proportion of Final Assessment Submission Time
 1 Test – Engineering Organisations 10% Week 7
 2 Test – Occupational Health & Safety 15% Week 10
 All Report 40% Week 14
 3 Test – Quality Systems 10% Week 16
 2 & 5 Oral Presentation 25% Wek 17 & 18

Note: All tests are on-line supervised tests.

Other Information

Underpinning Skills and Knowledge
Meaning of “Engineering”
Fields of Engineering
Engineering Industry Structure:- Contexts for Engineering Design Offices
Roles, responsibilities and qualifications of Design Office
Personnel
Design Office procedures (Drawing standards; Company manuals; Plotting; Filing, storage and retrieval; Scheduling work through the office; Checking design work and drawings)
Industrial awards and trade unions
Quality Systems:- Quality Perspectives
Quality Improvement
Quality Assurance and Quality Management Systems
Assurance and Improvement.
Occupational Health, Safety & Welfare:-
• Legal Framework
• Preventative nature of occupational health and safety
• Workplace audit
• Employer/Employee responsibilities
• Health and Safety programme
• Risk Management concepts:- Definition of risk management
• Risk management terminology
• Risk management process
• General sources of risk and their areas of impact
• Documentation
Technical Report writing:
• Technical writing skills
• Technical writing strategies
Oral presentations:- Use of presentation aids
- Overhead projector (presentation of slides)
- Pointers
- PowerPoint presentation
- Demonstrations
Voice projection
Organisation and timing of presentation

Study and Learning Support:
The Study and Learning Centre (SLC) provides free learning and academic development advice to all RMIT students.
Services offered by SLC to support numeracy and literacy skills are:
* Assignment writing, thesis writing and study skills advice
* Maths and science developmental support and advice
* English language development

Please refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/studyandlearningcentre to find more information

Disability Liaison Unit:
If you have a disability or long-term medical condition you should contact the DLU to seek advice and support.
Please Refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/disability to find more information about their services
Late submission:
If you require an extension for 7 calendar days or less (from the original due date) you must complete and lodge an Application for Extension of Submittable Work (7 Calendar Days or less) form and lodge it with the Senior Educator/ Program Manager.
The application must be lodged no later than one working day before the official due date. The student will be notified within no more than 2 working days of the date of lodgment as to whether the extension has been granted.

If you require an extension of more than 7 calendar days (from the original due date) you must lodge an Application for Special Consideration form under the provisions of the Special Consideration Policy, preferably prior to, but no later than 2 working days after the official due date.

Assignments submitted late without approval of an extension will not be accepted nor marked.

Special consideration:
Please Refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=riderwtscifm to find more information

Plagiarism:
Plagiarism is a form of cheating and it is a very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University.

Please Refer: www.rmit.edu.au/academicintegrity to find more information.

Other Information:
All email communications will be sent to your RMIT email address and it is recommended that you check it regularly.
 

Course Overview: Access Course Overview