Course Title: Originate concept for own work and conduct critical discourse

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term2 2012

Course Code: BUSM6278C

Course Title: Originate concept for own work and conduct critical discourse

School: 340T Art

Campus: City Campus

Program: C5234 - Diploma of Visual Art

Course Contact : Ninna Cikoja

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4472

Course Contact Email:TAFEArt@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

Anthony Riccardi - City campus
anthony.riccardi@rmit.edu.au
+61 3 99254472

Sharon West -  Bundoora campus
sharon.west@rmit.edu.au
+61 3 9925 7501

Nominal Hours: 60

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

None

Course Description

In this course you will learn the skills and knowledge required to originate the concept and conduct critical discourse about the concept for your own work. The concept encompasses ideas, form and context for the work. The course includes the need for research and analysis of ideas and references, plus the creation of innovative concepts. It also includes a requirement for critical and informed discourse with others about one’s own work.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

CUVCOR04A Originate concept for own work and conduct critical discourse

Element:

3. Conduct critical discourse 

Performance Criteria:

1. Identify relevant individuals to participate in critical discourse about work concepts
2. Identify potential ways in which discourse may be undertaken, and select the most appropriate
3. Provide key information on work concepts and concept development including influences, evaluation of options and problem-solving strategies
4. Use effective communication techniques to generate discussion, debate and critical analysis of the concept

Element:

1. Research concept ideas 

Performance Criteria:

1. Identify and source references which may inform concept development
2. Critically analyse sources and references in the context of current work
3. Collect, collate and analyse references to inform concept development

Element:

2. Generate concept 

Performance Criteria:

1. Develop a range of different, innovative and creative approaches for the concept based on the nature of own artistic practice
2. Reflect on and integrate ideas generated from research
3. Consider possible constraints for the concept, based on nature and purpose of work
4. Continuously reflect on and appraise ideas for the concept
5. Synthesise and refine concept based on research, reflection and relevant constraints

Element:

4. Adjust and refine concept 

Performance Criteria:

1. Undertake own analysis of concept and challenge ideas and approaches taken
2. Seek input and comments from others about the concept
3. Re-evaluate and refine options for the concept based on own analysis and critical discourse with others


Learning Outcomes


In this course, you learn through:
1. In-class activities:
lectures
teacher directed group activities/projects
class exercises to review discussions/lectures
peer teaching and class presentations
group discussion
class exercises to review discussions/lectures

2. Out-of-class activities include:
practical exercises
reading articles and excerpts
preparing for discussion
project work
independent research

You are expected to manage your learning and undertake an appropriate amount of out-of-class independent study and research and industry guests speak about professional practice.


Details of Learning Activities

Each class consists of a lecture and a discussion. These are illustrated with slides and overheads as well as using the whiteboard to convey ideas visually. Some lectures also come with slide sheets listing the images, which will be shown during the course of the lecture. Occasionally documentaries may also be shown, if relevant and available.


Teaching Schedule

SEMESTER 1
SESSION 1. INTRODUCTION.
Introductory Talk
Assessment requirements for the semester and the nature of the module is explained to them.
Content  Historical context to postmodernism and the other topics of this module; overview of Poststructuralism and postmodernism; challenges to the ideas of creativity, originality, modernism, etc; The importance of culture, identity, theory; the various uses of the term postmodern.

SESSION 2 POSTMODERNISM 1
Content A history and overview of Structuralism and Post-Structuralism. The influence of Rationalism, Freud, Marx and Nietzsche. The main thinkers of Structuralism (Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Lacan, Althusser, Eco, Barthes). The reaction to Structuralism and the advent of Post-Structuralism.
Structuralist thinkers discussed in depth:Saussure.  Levi-Strauss.

SESSION 3 POSTMODERNISM 2
Content Structuralism continued. Barthes. The nature of the Post-Structuralist reaction to Structuralism. Post Structuralist thinkers in depth: Lyotard.  Baudrillard

SESSION 4 POSTMODERNISM 3
Content Post-Structuralist thinkers continued. Derrida  Foucault.

SESSION 5 POSTMODERNISM 4
Content Postmodernism: Concerns, Qualities and Characteristics.The attributes of postmodernism are discussed. .
A series of artists’ works are shown and discussed in accordance to the ideas presented in the handout.
 
SESSION 6. POSTMODERNISM 5
The continuation of Postmodernism 4

SESSION 7 FEMINISM AND GENDER 1
Content A discussion of the term “feminism” and the different types of feminisms; a short history of feminism from the French Revolution to the present day.Definition and explanation of the term “gender” and related issues; essentialism vs. non-essentialism; psychological background to feminist theory, especially post-feminist theory; an account of the ideas of Freud in regards to infant sexuality and the formation gender; Freud’s influence on feminism and feminist critique of Freud.


SESSION 8 FEMINISM AND GENDER 2
Content Psychological background to feminist thought continued; the ideas of Jacques Lacan regarding gender development; Lacan’s influence on feminism and feminist critique of Lacan; Feminist thinkers- their ideas discussed: Luce Irigaray, Helene Cixous, Julia Kristeva.

SESSION 9 FEMINISM AND GENDER 3
Content An examination of women artists and how they implemented feminist ideas into their work.

SESSION 10 ART AND POLITICS 1
Content The ideas of Karl Marx;Marx and art;; Post Marxism and revolutionary politics post 1968: the relation between Post Marxism and Poststructuralism.


SESSION 11 ART AND POLITICS 2
Content The function of art in a Marxist context; an examination of the works and ideas of Hans Haake;. an examination of the works of other artists

SESSION 12 POSTCOLONIALISM 1
Content  The idea of Postcolonialism as a discipline; its aims and practices in relation to art; an examination of some postcolonial thinkers- Fanon, Said, Bhabha, Spivak
The application of postcolonial ideas in relation to art by examining modern African art as practiced in Africa and as practiced in America by artists of African descent

SESSION 13 POSTCOLONIALISM 2
Content  Use of Magic Realism in literature and art in Latin American, India, etc

SESSION 14 ISSUES IN AUSTRALIAN ART 1
Content Post modernism, Politics, Feminism and Postcolonialism in an Australian context

SESSION 15 ISSUES IN AUSTRALIAN ART 2
Content Post modernism, Politics, Feminism and Postcolonialism in an Australian context

SEMESTER 2
SESSION 1. INTRODUCTION TO AESTHETICS.
Introduction to the C/C4 topics.
Assessment details- presentation and explanation of Brief 1.
Content  An account of the major questions and issues concerning Aesthetics accompanied by an exercise given to discover/ formulate one’s own aesthetic criteria. This is followed by a discussion.

SESSION 2. THE CREATIVE PROCESS
Content A general coverage of the creative process, its stages, problems, strategies and solutions and ideas taken from various visual and non-visual artists.

SESSION 3 THE CREATIVE PROCESS (continued.).
Content A general coverage of the creative process, its stages, problems, strategies and solutions and ideas taken from various visual and non-visual artists.

SESSION 4. AESTHETICS 1-FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE 1800’S
Content This covers: Plato, Aristotle; Aesthetic history fom the reaissance to the 18th century Renaissance aesthetics-.


SESSION 5 AESTHETICS 2- FROM ROMANTICISM TO MODERN ART
Content Romanticism: Baudelaire. Formalism: Bell, Fry

SESSION 6 AESTHETICS 3 – MODERN ART
Content  Surrealist Aesthetics; Croce; , Greenberg.

SESSION 7. AESTHETICS 4. POST MODERNISM
Content Critique of Greenberg; Institutional theory of art; Post-modern concepts of aesthetics

SESSION 8 GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS 1
THE MUSEUM IN HISTORY
A film on museum practice is shown
Content On the development of museums from the Renaissance to the age of Napoleon;

SESSION 9. GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS 2
CONTEMPORARY ART MUSEUMS.
Content Early 20th century museum practices; changes after world war 1
Modern art practices: Museum of Modern Art; Post Modern  practices, concerns, politics of display; The museum as Text / as narrative: Contemporary problems regarding display; Museum as spectacle;.

SESSION 10. GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS 3
Content The use of museum practices and forms by artists:


SESSION 11 IDEAS REGARDING CREATIVITY THROUGH HISTORY 1
Content The nature and role of the artist and the nature of creativity as seen through Western History. Medieval views. Artist as craftsperson; Renaissance views- The changing social role and status of the artist; The changing values of art, Cennini and Alberti on creativity; Issues regarding the training of artists; the nature of creativity, the artist’s psychology and behaviour from fifteenth to eighteenth century; The development of issues related to the creative individual: artistic image, madness, eccentricity, genius, sexuality.

SESSION 12. IDEAS REGARDING CREATIVITY THROUGH HISTORY 2
Content  Nineteenth century to contemporary views on creativity and the nature of the artist
Examples of creative practices explored: Picasso’s development of the Saltimbanques, Demoiselles d’Avignon, Guernica and various other works

SESSION 13 .IDEAS REGARDING CREATIVITY THROUGH HISTORY 3
Content Examples of creative practices continued; 

SESSION 14 IDEAS REGARDING CREATIVITY THROUGH HISTORY 4
Content Examples of creative practices continued; Discussion

SESSION 15 CRITICISM 1
A general talk and exercise is given followed by a discussion.
Collect essay

SESSION 16 CRITICISM 2
Content. The idea of value-intrinsic, extrinsic, instrumental. Approaches to criticism; personal subjectivity, intuitionism, emotivism, relativism, critical singularism: Examples of criticism: catalogue essay, academic treatise, cultural criticism, Conservative harangue, Philosophical essay, Descriptive art criticism, Poetic art criticism.


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts


References


Other Resources

BIBLIOGRAPHY POSTMODERNISM:
(Note: many of the texts under Postmodernism also include information regarding Feminism, Politics and Post colonialism.)

General References
Archer, M – Art since 1960. (1997) 
Atkins, R – Art Speak: A Guide to Contemporary Ideas, Movements and Buzzwords.: 1945 to the Present. (1997)
Dempsey, Amy – Styles, Schools and Movements: An Encyclopedic Guide to Modern Art.
Edgar, A & Sedgwick, P – Key Concepts in Cultural Theory. (1999)
Fineberg, J – Art since 1940: Strategies of Being (2000)
Hopkins, D – After Modern Art 1945-2000 (2000).
Lucie-Smith, E – Movements in Art since 1945 (ed. 2000)
Lucie-Smith, E – Visual Arts in the 20th Century (1996)
Taylor, B – The Art of Today (1995)
Wheeler, D – Art Since Mid Century. (1991)
Vergine, L – A Guide to Contemporary Movements (2001)

Anthologies
Cahoone, L.E – From Modernism to Postmodernism: An Anthology (1996)
Harrison, C & Wood, P – Art in Theory 1900-1990: An anthology of changing ideas (1993)
Jencks, C – The Post Modern Reader (1993)
Natoli, J & Hutchen, L – A Post - Modern Reader
Truett Anderson, W – The Fontana Post Modernism Reader (1996)
Wheale, N – The Postmodern Arts: An Introductory Reader. (1995)

Main References
Appignaresi, R & Garratt, C. Post Modernism for Beginners (1995)
Berman, A – From the New Criticism to Deconstruction: The Reception of Structuralism and Post Structuralism. (1998)
Bertens, H – The Idea of the Postmodern- A History. (1995)
Brunette, P & Willis, D – Deconstruction and the Visual Arts : Art, Media ,Architecture. (1994)
Butler, C – Postmodernism: A Very Short History (2002)
Danto, A.C – Postmodern Culture: An Introduction to Theories of the Contemporary (1997)
Docker, J – Postmodernism and Popular Culture: A Cultural History. (1994)
Heartney, E – Postmodernism (2001)
Hoesterey, I – Pastiche: Cultural Memory in Art, Film, Literature (2001)
Eagleton, T – The Illusions of Postmodernism (1996)
Jencks, C – Architecture Today (1993)
Jencks, C –Post-Modernism: the New Classicism in Art and Architecture (1987)
Jencks, C – The Language of Post-Modern Architecture (1991)
Jencks, C – What is Post Modernism (1996)
Leitch, V.B – Post Modernism: Local Effects, Global Flows (1996)
Moxey, K.P.F – The Practice of Theory: Poststructuralism, Cultural Politics and Art History (1994)
Norris, C – Deconstruction Theory and Practice (1991)
Parmesani, L – Art of the Twentieth Century: Movements, Theories, Schools and Tendencies. 1900-2000 (2000)
Risatti, H – Postmodern Perspectives: Issues in Contemporary Art (1990)
Sandler, I – Art of the Postmodern Era (1996)
Schapiro, G (Ed) – After the Future: Postmodern Times and Places (1990)
Sim, S (Ed) – The Icon Critical Dictionary of Postmodern Thought. (1998)
Sim, S (Ed) – The Routledge Companion to Post Modernism
Tester, K – The life and Times of Post Modernity (1993)
Various – The New Romantics (1988)
Various – The New Modernism: Deconstructionist Tendencies in Art. (1988)
Wallis, B & Tucke, M – Art after Modernism: Rethinking Representation (1984) ART
Woods, T – Beginning Post-Modernism. (1999)

Postmodernist Philosophers
BARTHES
Barthes, R – The Death of The Author (1968) (Essay)
Barthes, R – Mythologies. (1957)
BAUDRILLARD
Baudrillard, J – For a critique of the political economy of the sign. (1981)
Baudrillard, J –The Ecstasy of Communication (1987)
Baudrillard, J – Seduction (1979)
Baudrillard, J – Simulacra and Simulation (1997)
Danto, A.C – Baudrillard, J. (1997)(STA)
Kellner, D (ed) – Baudrillard: A Critical Reader.(1994)
DERRIDA
Derrida, J - Dissemination (1982)
Derrida, J - Writing and Difference (1995)
Caputo, J.D (ed.) – Deconstruction in a nutshell: A Conversation with Jacques Derrida. (1997)
Johnson, C – Derrida: The Scene of Writing. (1997)
FOUCAULT
Foucault, M – The Order of Things (1970)
Foucault, M – The Archaeology of Knowledge (1989)
LYOTARD
Lyotard, J.F – The Postmodern Condition: A Report on Knowledge. (1991)
Readings, B – Introducing Lyotard: Art and Politics (1991)
Sim, S – Jean - Francois Lyotard (1995)

ART AND POLITICS
Becker, C – The subversive imagination: Artists, society and social responsibility. (1994)
Felshin, N – But is it Art?: The spirit of Art as Activism (1995)
Hadjinicolau, N – Art history and class struggle (1973)
Jordon, G ; Weedon ,C – Cultural politics: Class, Gender, Race and the postmodern world (1991)
Robert, J – Postmodernism, politics and art (1990)
Wood, P – Conceptualism (2002)

FEMINISM
Broude,N; Garrad,M.D – The Power of Feminist Art Emergence, impact and triumph of the American
Feminist Art Movement (1994)
Broude,N Garrard,M.D;– Feminism and Art History : Questioning the Litany (1982)
Chadwick,W – Women, Art and Society (1996)
Chicago,J – The Dinner party (1996)
Ecker,G (ed) – Feminist Aesthetics (1985)
Gamble, S(ed) – The Routledge Companion to Feminism and Post Feminism (2001)
Humm ,M.-.The Dictionary of Feminist Theory (1989)
Isaak,J – Feminism and Contemporary Art: The revolutionary power of women’s laughter (1996)
Lovell, T; Wolkowitz, C; Andremahr, S – A concise glossary of Feminist Theory
McDonald, H – Erotic Ambiguities: The Female Nude in Art (2001)
Nicholson,L – Feminism/Postmodern (1990)
Parker,R; Pollock,G – Old Mistresses: Women, Art and Ideology ( )
Reckett, H (ed) – Art and Feminism, (2001)
Robinson (ed) – Feminism-Art- Theory: an Anthology 1968-2000 (2001)
Tuttle, L – Encyclopedia of Feminism (1986)
Weedon, C – Feminist Practice and Post Structuralist Theory ( )

POST-COLONIALISM
Joseph, M; Fink, J.N (eds) – Performing Hybridity (1999)
Loomba, A – Colonialism/Post Colonialism (1998)
Mongia ,P – Contemporary Postcolonial Theory (1997)
Spivak, G – A Critique of Post Colonial Reason: Toward a History of the Vanishing Present (1999)


Overview of Assessment

Assessment may incorporate a range of methods to assess performance and the application of essential underpinning knowledge, and might include:

  • participation in a critical discourse on the candidate’s work concepts
  • discussion and questioning about research and development processes
  • written and/or verbal reports
  • visual presentation, including diagrams, charts, slides, using digital technology
  • review of portfolios of evidence
  • third party workplace reports


Assessment Tasks

Assessment for both semesters will be in the form of an essay. The essay for the first semester is of a more formal and academic type while that for the second semester consists more of a collection of texts

Semester 1.Research report.
You will be asked to choose an art related topic, the research of which, will help in the development of the conceptual context behind their practical work and thinking. All chosen topics are discussed with the teacher before you begin your research in order to tailor the topic as well as possible to the your needs. In addition to this, you will be required to demonstrate your knowledge of the units content, by relating one or more of the discussed subjects (e.g. feminism, marxism, etc) to the study of your chosen topic.

Words 3,000+

Semester 2 Report on own work
You will be asked to write an report on your own work. This report consists of a number of discrete texts dealing with different issues.
These include:

  • An account of your artistic vision, your ideas, aims and influences. This gives you a greater awareness and an overview of what exactly you have been doing and what has been developing.
  • An account is given of their creative process-an awareness of how it works; when it doesn’t work; and what steps are taken to overcome blockages and problems. This helps to build an awareness in the students that they need to be creative not only in making their work but also in working out problems in the creative process itself
  • An account is given regarding a hypothetical or real exhibition of their work. It includes not just the details of the exhibition but conceptual issues dealt with by the student in their choice of the specific form of exhibiting. This textis designed to raise a greater awareness of the conceptual, philosophical, political and cultural meanings that the students can convey through their mode of exhibiting.
  • Finally you will need to choose and address two aesthetic questions dealt with during the semester and relate them to your own work.


Words 3000


Assessment Matrix

Assessment taskElementsPerformance criteriaUnderpinning skills and knowledgeCritical aspect of evidence
Research report1. Research concept ideas
2. Generate concepts
1.1,1.2,1.3
2.1,2.2,2.3,2.4, 2.5
  • Assessment must include evidence of the following knowledge and skills:
  • a wide range of sources of information pertaining to the development of the concept
  • in-depth appropriate communication methods to encourage critical discourse about the concept for own work
  • the theoretical and philosophical context for concept development
  • other artists/designers/curators/arts administrators and their development of concepts for their own work
  • thorough knowledge of the elements and principles of
    design and how they may be used in the development
    of the concept for own work
  • copyright, moral rights and intellectual property issues and legislation which assist the development and critical discourse of the concept for own work
  • literacy skills sufficient to research and evaluate a wide range of source materials for the development of the concept for own work
    literacy skills sufficient to conduct a critical discourse about the concept for own work
The following evidence is critical to the judgement of competence in this unit:
  • development of the concept through a process of selecting and critically analysing source material, then synthesising and refining the concept for own work
  • effective participation in a critical discourse about the concept for own work which shows a command of relevant references, terminologies and ideas
Report on own work3. Conduct critical discourse
4. Adjust and refine concept

 
3.1,3.2,3.3,3.4
4.1,4.2,4.3
  

Other Information

Feedback
You will receive verbal and written feedback by teacher on your work. This feedback also includes suggestions on how you can proceed to the next stage of developing your projects.

Plagiarism
RMIT has a strict policy on plagiarism. Please refer to the website for more information on this policy.

Special consideration Policy (Late Submission)
All assessment tasks are required to be completed to a satisfactory level. If you are unable to complete any piece of assessment by the due date, you will need to apply for an extension.
Please refer to the following URL for extensions and special consideration:
http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=qkssnx1c5r0y;STATUS=A;PAGE_AUTHOR=Andrea%20Syers;SECTION=1;

Course Overview: Access Course Overview