Course Title: Advanced AC Machines

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term2 2012

Course Code: EEET5368

Course Title: Advanced AC Machines

School: 130T Engineering (TAFE)

Campus: City Campus

Program: C6016 - Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology (Principal Technical Officer)

Course Contact : Program Manager

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4468

Course Contact Email:engineering-tafe@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

Andrew Kim
Location: City, 57.5.20
Telephone: 9925 4295
Fax: 9925 8099
Email: andrew.kim@rmit.edu.au

Nominal Hours: 80

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

The following modules (or equivalents) should be preferably completed prior to, or in conjunction with, this module:
 EA140 Power Systems Analysis

Course Description

To analyze the operational environment to allow the appropriate selection of a motor and starting system including the analysis of the performance of common AC machines, (including starting and braking).


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

EB110 Advanced AC Machines


Learning Outcomes


On completion of this module the learner will be able to:

1. Outline the basic operating principles of three phase induction motor operation and determine winding details, synchronous speed, rotor frequency, torque, speed, air gap power and rotor impedance.
2. Perform the necessary tests to determine the approximate equivalent circuit values of a three phase induction motor, predict the motor performance by calculation and confirm the predictions by measurements.
3. Outline the factors influencing the selection of three phase induction motor starters and braking circuits.
4. Outline the basic operating principles of three phase synchronous motors, perform the necessary tests to determine the equivalent circuit values, predict the motor performance by calculation and confirm the predictions by measurements.
5. Outline the factors influencing the selection of three phase synchronous motor starters and braking circuits.
6. Outline the basic operating principles of single phase induction motors, perform the necessary tests to determine the equivalent circuit values, and predict the motor performance by calculation.
7. Describe the construction, operation and application of the various types of fractional kilowatt motors.
8. Estimate the acceleration time of a given motor/load combination.
9. Estimate the size of a motor subjected to a cyclic loading using the RMS method.


Details of Learning Activities

Students will participate in a variety of learning methods such as lectures, tutorials, practical, classroom discussion and assessment tasks.


Teaching Schedule

Please note: While your teacher will cover all the materials in the schedule, the weekly teaching and assessment order is subject to change depending on class needs and availability of resources.

Week 1 Magnetic Quantities

Week 2 Magnetic Circuits

Week 3
Cyclic Loading - RMS method
• Peak torque capability
• Estimation of motor rating when subjected to a cyclic varying load which could be subjected to:
discreet power steps, linear power ramps, periods when the rotor is stationary.

Week 4
Three phase induction motor
• Basic construction, windings
• Rotating magnetic field from stationary coils
• EMF equation produced by a 3 phase stator winding and its significance

Week 5
Three phase induction motor
• Rotor impedance at a given value of slip given standstill values
• Rotor frequency
• Relationship between torque and speed for both small and large values of slip
• Slip for maximum torque.
• Losses

Week 6
Three phase induction motor
• Relationship between air-gap power, gross torque, and net torque
• Definition of torque: starting, pull-up, pull-in, breakdown, maximum, full-load, no-load
• Exact and approximate equivalent circuits and assumptions used.

Week 7
Three phase induction motor
• No-load test, locked rotor test and resistance tests
• Equivalent circuit component values from the no-load and locked rotor tests.
• Motor performance from: separation of losses test and load test.

Week 8
Three phase induction motor
• Braking functions and methods, schematic diagrams.
• Comparison of star-delta, primary resistance, auto-transformers, electronic "soft-start",
secondary resistance starters, schematic diagrams.
• Supply authorities’ rules regarding direct on line starting.
• Performance of the reduced voltage motor starting techniques.

Week 9
Three Phase Synchronous Motors
• Construction & operating Principles.
• Cylindrical and salient pole rotors.

Week 10
Single phase induction motors
• Theory of operation and construction
• Counter rotating field theory and cross field theory.
• Optimum impedance of start winding or capacitor

Week 11
Single phase induction motors
• No-load and locked rotor test
• Motor parameters from the equivalent circuit values.
• Equivalent circuit component values from the no-load and locked rotor test.
• Slip for maximum torque.
• Slip for maximum power output.

Week 12
Single phase shaded pole, reluctance, hysteresis and universal motors.
• Construction, operation and application of the various types of fractional kilowatt motors.
Acceleration and deceleration time.
• Moment of inertia.
• Reflected inertia and torque through a gearbox.

Week 13
Acceleration and deceleration time.
• Time estimations given motor and load speed/torque characteristics
Cyclic Loading - RMS method
• Motor winding temperature.
• Forward and braking power.

Week 14
Assessment 1 – Part B
Build a motor

Week 15
Assessment 1 – Part B
Build a motor

Week 16
Revision

Week 17
Examination
 


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts


References

Hubert, C.I. Electrical Machines, Merrill, 1991.

Richardson, D. & Caisse, A. Rotating Electric Machinery and Transformer Technology. (3Ed.)
Prentice Hall, 1987.

Introductory Circuit Analysis, 10th Ed, Boylestad, Mc Millan


Other Resources

Course Materials and Assignment are uploaded in the Blackboard under folder name course material and assignment.
 


Overview of Assessment

- Project 
- Assignments throughout the course 
- End of course exam 


Assessment Tasks

Students are required to pass each of the following assessment tasks to complete this unit

Assessment 1 - Assignment and Build a motor (40%)
Students must complete all assignments designed to reinforce the theory topics taught during the semester. The assignments will cover theory and calculation problems.

Assessment 2 - Examination Closed book (60%)
 


Assessment Matrix

 Learning Outcome% of Assessment
Assessment 1 (Assignment)1 to 930
Assessment 1 (Build a motor)1 to 910
Assessment 2 (Examination)1 to 960

Other Information

Study and learning Support:

Study and Learning Centre (SLC) provides free learning and academic development advice to you.
Services offered by SLC to support your numeracy and literacy skills are:

assignment writing, thesis writing and study skills advice
maths and science developmental support and advice
English language development

Please Refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/studyandlearningcentre to find more information about Study and learning Support

Disability Liaison Unit:

If you are suffering from long-term medical condition or disability, you should contact Disability Liaison Unit to seek advice and
support to complete your studies.

Please Refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/disability to find more information about services offered by Disability Liaison Unit

Late submission:

If you require an Extension of Submittable Work (assignments, reports or project work etc.) for 7 calendar days or less (from the original due date) and have valid reasons, you must complete and
lodge an Application for Extension of Submittable Work (7 Calendar Days or less) form and lodge it with the Senior Educator/ Program Manager.
The application must be lodged no later than one working day before the official due date. You will be notified within
no more than 2 working days of the date of lodgment as to whether the extension has been granted.

If you seek an Extension of Submittable Work for more than 7 calendar days (from the original due date) must lodge an Application for Special
Consideration form under the provisions of the Special Consideration Policy, preferably prior to, but no later than 2 working days
after the official due date.

Submittable Work (assignments, reports or project work etc.) submitted late without approval of an extension will not be accepted or marked.


Special consideration:

Please Refer http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=riderwtscifm to find more information about special consideration

Plagiarism:

Plagiarism is a form of cheating and it is very serious academic offence that may lead to expulsion from the University.

Please Refer: www.rmit.edu.au/academicintegrity to find more information about plagiarism.

Other Information:

All email communications will be sent to your RMIT email address and you must regularly check your RMIT emails.


 

Course Overview: Access Course Overview