Course Title: Establish the creative vision for screen productions

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term1 2015

Course Code: VART5924C

Course Title: Establish the creative vision for screen productions

School: 345T Media and Communication

Campus: City Campus

Program: C6087 - Advanced Diploma of Screen and Media

Course Contact : Program Administration

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4815

Course Contact Email:mcvet@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff


Teacher: Ms Barbara Gliddon
Phone: 9925 4072
Email: barbara.gliddon@rmit.edu.au

Nominal Hours: 50

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

N/A

Course Description

This unit of competency, Establish the creative vision for screen productions CUFDRT601A is delivered in the class Design Studio 4, together with Develop a marketing plan BSBMKG609A and Manage the marketing process BSBMKG603B. The aim of this course is for students to concurrently develop a variety of screen based productions, both as individuals and as part of production teams.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

CUFDRT601A Establish the creative vision for screen productions

Element:

1 Review and interpret scripts.

Performance Criteria:

1.1. Read available drafts of scripts and arrange meetings with appropriate creative personnel to discuss potential interpretations of the vision.
1.2. Assess the intended creative aims of scripts, define proposed objectives and explore how they may be realised visually or through the use of sound.
1.3. Generate and consider a range of ideas for visualising scripts until a clear narrative emerges.
1.4. Identify research and reference materials to inform creative directions and to assist in providing the context for productions.
1.5. Review script drafts in collaboration with writers, agree on the need for any rewrites and organise timetables for completions.
1.6. Prepare clear development notes for script writers to produce script re-drafts as required.
1.7. Document perceived visual and dramatic elements in scripts as the basis for shot plans.
 

Element:

2 Prepare shot plans to realise visual narrative.

Performance Criteria:

2.1.Mark up working script into its component scenes and identify key dramatic elements and technical parameters within each scenic unit.
2.2. Plot key dramatic elements within each scene and between scenes to realise the transformation of the written narrative into its visual representation.
2.3. Consider the whole of the narrative and scenes to determine the location of characters and other elements for each individual shot.
2.4. Assess the photographic qualities of proposed shots and how they may impact on interpreting the story overall and within each scene.
2.5. Ensure overall shot plans allow both narrative and visual aspects to be controlled and carried forward to meet overall production requirements.
2.6. Discuss shot plans with relevant production personnel prior to development of any storyboards.
 

Element:

3 Review and communicate proposed shot plan

Performance Criteria:

3.1. Identify and document areas of productions that may be affected by script versions and discuss changes with colleagues.
3.2. Arrange sign-off for final script with producers if applicable and ensure it is distributed to relevant creative personnel.
3.3. Maintain an ongoing review of script and shot plans and organise for any further rewrites while production is underway.
3.4. Provide relevant production personnel with appropriate documentation, including latest version of script or script updates as applicable.
 


Learning Outcomes


Upon successful completion of this course, you will have acquired the skills and knowledge to develop the creative vision required for the production of a variety of screen based products. These include animations, short narrative dramas, interactive, mobile and web based productions.


Details of Learning Activities

 

In-class learning activities include, but are not limited to:
• Observation
• Listening and writing exercises
• screenings
• group discussion
• analysis of material
• teacher directed group activities/projects
• workshopping of students’ own projects

 

Out-of-class activities include, but are not limited to,
• research
• reading
• independent project based work.


Teaching Schedule

 

 This Course is co-delivered with Write Scripts CUFWRT601A


 Week
 Class Content
 Assessment Due
CUFDRT601A

CUFWRT601A

 1 Introduction to course. Critical language in examining screenplays. Reflection on previous production including strengths and weaknesses, including mise-en-scene and dramatic intent. 

CUFWRT601A

1

CUFDRT601A

1,

 2 The Audience: Audience expectations, the purpose of various screenwriting narrative forms. Brainstorming ideas.Evaluating script concepts and ideas as written work and a visual plan.

Discussion/evaluation of the role of visualisation including mis-e-scene, and dramatic intent: why this location, this time of day, this costume, these colours? Blocking, rule of thirds, lighting etc. Thoughts on visualising the screenplay

Assessment task one A (1A).Ungraded (half the class group.)

Prepare to Write Scripts. Presentation; reviewing the script to screen process from previous productions.

Assessment task one B (1B) Ungraded Preparing a storyboard, shot list or marked up script.

CUFWRT601A

1

CUFDRT601A

1, 2

 3 Incorporating feedback. Delivering feedback (professional language.) Working in tandem - the writer and the editor and or assessor. Documenting responses.
Listening skills. Discerning levels of response both as writer and assessor editor.

Discussing possible changes through various drafts of the screenplay.

 

Assessment task one A (1A). Ungraded (half the class group.)

Prepare to write scripts. Presentation; reviewing the script to screen process from previous productions. Ungraded.

CUFWRT601A

1

CUFDRT601A

1, 2

 4 Generating ideas. Writing stories, reviewing and discussions of story content, stories for short films. Storylines written in class and receive feedback. The individual benefits of shotlisting, storyboarding and marking up a script. 

CUFWRT601A

1

CUFDRT601A

1
 5 Reading screenplays. Establishing the criteria to provide an effective measure of the success of screenplays with regard to pace, tone, beginning and ends of scenes and story beats and internal and external structure. Researching audience variations and expectations as reflected in screenplay’s content and objectives and the screenplays choice of visuals. 

CUFWRT601A

1

CUFDRT601A

1
 6 The facts in screenwriting: researching factual information is accurate. Research for screenwriters. Shaping information as narrative. What can be included in the shot in factual storytelling with regard to the film makers’ responsibilities for all interested parties and stake holders.

Obligations with regard to copyright, RMIT’s code of ethics. Classifications ratings in Australia.

Australian law and selecting and discerning appropriate content in fact based stories either in adaptation or documentary.

 

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

2

 7 The facts in screenwriting: researching factual information is accurate, research for screenwriters. Shaping information as narrative. What can be included in the shot in factual storytelling with regard to the film makers’ responsibilities for all interested parties and stake holders.
Obligations with regard to copyright, RMIT’s code of ethics. Classifications ratings in Australia.
Australian law and

Identification of key dramatic elements within each scene and between scenes to realise the transformation of writing to visual narration. Examples on screen and in writing exercise. Discerning text and sub text.in dialogue and visuals.
Identification of production requirements: the writer’s responsibilities. Developing the look of the film, from an overarcing vision to individual shots. Blocking the scenes (character placement and its role in narrative.)
The short film and the budget.

Critical language, the content of screenplay assessments and the protocols around their writing and delivery and communications with reference to narrative and all aspects of visual story telling.
 

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

2

 8.
Identification of key dramatic elements within each scene and between scenes to realise the transformation of writing to visual narration. Examples on screen and in writing exercise. Discerning text and sub text.in dialogue and visuals.
Identification of production requirements: the writer’s responsibilities. Developing the look of the film, from an over-arcing vision to individual shots. Blocking the scenes, rule of thirds (character placement and its role in narrative.) Lighting and visual storytelling
 

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

2

 9 Identification of production requirements: the writer’s responsibilities. Developing the look of the film, from an overarcing vision to individual shots. Blocking the scenes (character placement and its role in narrative.)

The short film and the budget.

 

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

2, 3

 10 

Critical language, the content of screenplay assessments and the protocols around their writing and delivery and communications with referwnce to narrative and all aspects of visual story telling. 

 

Assessment task two. Ungraded. (Part one) Exchange of draft screenplay with a fellow student for review and feedback.

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

3

 11 

Incorporating feedback. Delivering feedback (professional language.) Working in tandem - the writer and the editor and or assessor. Documenting responses.
Listening skills. Discerning levels of response both as writer and assessor editor.

Discussing possible changes through various drafts of the screenplay.

 

CUFWRT601A

2

CUFDRT601A

2

 12 Writing a draft screenplay. Students work individually on screenplays and receive feedback from teacher and student with whom screenplays have been exchanged. The feedback will address questions of narrative including all aspects of visual storytelling. 

CUFWRT601A

2, 3

CUFDRT601A

3

 13 Writing a draft screenplay. Students work individually on screenplays and receive feedback from teacher and student with whom screenplays have been exchanged. The feedback will address questions of narrative including all aspects of visual storytelling.Assessment task two (part two.) Ungraded. Receiving and delivering feedback on draft screenplays

CUFWRT601A

2, 3

CUFDRT601A

3

 14 Location or studio? Considering various approaches to camera coverage for identifying and maximising the screenplay’s content. 

CUFWRT601A

2
 15 

Deadline for delivery of final draft screenplay to teacher.
Make final adjustments to screenplay and submit to relevant personnel. Writing the final draft incorporating feedback. Students work individually (or with student who is giving feedback on their screenplay) on final draft.

Assessment task three, Draft script. Graded.

CUFWRT601A

3

CUFDRT601A

3

 16 

Review processes. Make final adjustments to screenplay.

 

CUFWRT601A

3

CUFDRT601A

3


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts

Art Direction for Film and Video, Robert Olson

production.4filming.com/cinematography2.html

elementsofcinema.com/directing/mise-en-scene-in-films/

  collegefilmand mediastudies.com/mise-en-scene-2/

Directing Actors, Creating Memorable Performances for Film and Television, Judith Weston


References

You are advised to look at the course Blackboard site for ongoing updated information.

Field, 1994, Screenplay: the foundations of screenwriting, Dell Publishing

Field, 2006, The screenwriter's workbook, Delta Trade Paperbacks

Vorhaus, 1994, The comic toolbox: how to be funny even if you're not, Allen & Unwin


Other Resources

Access to computers.


Overview of Assessment

Assessment for this course is ongoing throughout the semester and involves practical exercises, knowledge assessment tasks, presentations and written projects.


Assessment Tasks

Asessment task one A (1A)(Ungraded).

Preparing to Write Scripts.

You are to write and deliver  three to five minute presentation reflecting on the script to screen process of your Diploma major assignment.

Due weeks two and three. (2 and 3) Commencing 16 February & 23 February.

Assessment task one B (1B) Ungraded

A prepared storyboard, shot list or marked up script.

Due week 2. Commencing 16 February

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment task two (2)(Ungraded)

Write Draft Script

You are to write a draft screenplay of seven to twelve minutes duration  and deliver this draft to a fellow student for feedback with regard to narrative and production requirements. (This is a two part process: giving and receiving feedback.)

Part one (the exchange of screenplays) due week ten (10) Commencing 20 April

Part two due (exchanging feedback) due week thirteen (13) Commencing 11 May

---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Assessment task three (3)

Produce Draft Scripts (Graded)

You  are to deliver a revised draft of your seven to twelve minute screenplay for assessment and feedback to the teacher.

Due week fifteen (15). Commencing 25 May.

To demonstrate competency in this course, you will need to complete the following pieces of assessment to a satisfactory standard. You will receive feedback on all assessment.


Grades used in this unit are as follows:

CHD Competent with High Distinction
CDI  Competent with Distinction
CC   Competent with Credit
CAG  Competence Achieved - Graded
NYC  Not Yet Competent
DNS  Did Not Submit for Assessment


Assessment Matrix

The assessment matrix demonstrates alignment of assessment tasks with the relevant Unit of Competency: CUFWRT601A and CUFDRT601A. These are available through the course administrator.

Other Information

Please refer to the RMIT student page for extensive information about study support, assessment, extensions, appeals and a range of other matters: http://www.rmit.edu.au/students

Cover Sheet for Submissions:
You must complete a submission cover sheet for every piece of submitted work, including online submissions. This signed sheet acknowledges that you are aware of the plagiarism implications 

Attendance:
The major learning experience involves studio based exercises, demonstration and production. It is strongly advised that you attend all sessions in order to engage in the required learning activities, ensuring the maximum opportunity to gain the competency.

Feedback:
You will receive verbal and written feedback on your work. Where relevant, this feedback will also include suggestions on how you can proceed to the next stage of developing your projects.
Student feedback at RMIT: http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=9pp3ic9obks7

Student Progress:
Monitoring academic progress is an important enabling and proactive strategy to assist you to achieve your learning potential.
Student progress policy: http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=vj2g89cve4uj1

Special consideration Policy (Late Submission):
All assessment tasks are required to be completed to a satisfactory level. If you are unable to complete any piece of assessment by the due date, you will need to apply for an extension. Special consideration, appeals and discipline : http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=qkssnx1c5r0y

Academic Integrity and Plagiarism:

RMIT University has a strict policy on plagiarism and academic integrity. Please refer to the website for more information on this policy go to Academic Integrity : http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=kw02ylsd8z3n
 

Course Overview: Access Course Overview