RMIT Gallery Exhibition Program 2006

Sigmar Polke: Music from an Unknown Source

 Image: Sigmar Polke, «There’s always a pecking order», says Dagmar Steffen and straightens up the butter knife, 1996. Copyright: Sigmar Polke; photographer: Frank Kleinbach

Image: Sigmar Polke, «There’s always a pecking order», says Dagmar Steffen and straightens up the butter knife, 1996. Copyright: Sigmar Polke; photographer: Frank Kleinbach.

Exhibition dates: 18 December 2006 - 17 February 2007

Music from an Unknown Source brings together a series of 40 gouaches by Sigmar Polke, from 1996. Since the early 1960s, Polke has been concerned with the relationship between the reality as contained in a picture and reality itself, the relation between art and daily life. In the gouaches of this exhibition, Polke makes the dripping and flowing of paint his theme, contrasting the unpredictable flow of paint with an overlaid regular and predictable screen system. These pictures give a significant insight into Polke’s artistic oeuvre and belong among the most significant of the German postwar era. An exhibition of the Institut Für Auslandsbeziehungen/IFA and the Goethe Institut.




An exhibition of the Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen/ Institute for Cultural Relations and the Goethe-Institut.

An exhibition of the Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen/Institute for Cultural Relations and the Goethe-Institut.




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SIEMENS–RMIT Fine Art Scholarship Awards

 Image: Kate Spencer, Hot Water Bottle, 2005 Latex rubber, DVD player, 170 x 170 x 8 cm Siemens 2005 Acquisition Prize Winner

Image: Kate Spencer, Hot Water Bottle, 2005 Latex rubber, DVD player, 170 x 170 x 8 cm Siemens 2005 Acquisition Prize Winner.

Exhibition dates: 27 November - 9 December 2006

This is the 6th year of the prestigious Siemens RMIT Fine Art Scholarship, one of the most progressive and rewarding scholarships of its kind in Australia, enabling students to further their careers in the field of fine arts by assisting research and production costs. Eight students will receive scholarships, comprising five undergraduate travel scholarships and three postgraduate scholarships to a total of $32,000 as well as one artist receiving the $1000 Siemens Fine Arts Acquisition Award, with their work becoming part of the Siemens art collection. An initiative of the School of Art, RMIT University.

The 2006 shortlist includes:

  • Jeremy Bakker,
  • Nigel Brown
  • Simon Cottrell
  • Prue Crome
  • Simon Currell
  • Wendy Dracoulis
  • Lisa Frankland,
  • Michael Georgetti
  • Anna Gilby
  • Peter Gurry
  • Leon Hawker
  • Renda Helal
  • Douglas Hendry
  • Bianca Hester
  • Lisa Hilli
  • Kate Just
  • Katie Lee

  • Sanne Mestrom
  • Angela Morgan
  • Joanna Mortreux
  • James Murnane
  • Philippa Lesley Murray
  • Stephanie Neoh
  • Elizabeth Nigol
  • Robyn Phelan
  • Emily Plunkett
  • Pheobe Ross
  • Lisa Rumler
  • Deane Sobey
  • Kate Spencer
  • Salote Tawale
  • John Waller
  • Angela Watters
  • Mon-Xi Wu
  • Sally Zurbo

View Media Release for SIEMENS–RMIT Fine Art Scholarship Awards

The five Undergraduate scholarships of $2,000 are awarded to:

(1) Prue Crome, for her work titled "Light Passage

(2) Lisa Frankland, for the installation titled "Un-Packing"

(3) Anna Gilby, for her work titled "Window"

(4) Robyn Phelan, for her ceramic piece titled "3 Teapots"

(5) Sally Zurbo, for her drawing "Untitled 2"

The three Postgraduate scholarships of $7,000 are awarded to:

(1) Bianca Hester, for her installation titled "Project, Projects, Compressed"

(2) Kate Just, for her sculpture titled "Family"

(3) Sanné Mestrom, for the watercolour titled "A history of space is the history of wars #1"

The $1,000 Siemens Acquisition Award 2006 is awarded to Anna Gilby for "Window", a free hanging relief in plaster, bandage, wire, aluminium and steel.

A judging panel of Siemens employees has selected the acquisition piece which will enter the prestigious Siemens corporate collection on display at its corporate headquarters in Bayswater, Victoria.

Siemens logo




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Nihonga

 Image: KATAOKA Tamako, Mt Fuji in Blue, 1976

Image: KATAOKA Tamako, Mt Fuji in Blue, 1976.

Exhibition dates: 29 November - 9 December 2006

This collection of works was a gift to the people of Victoria in 1976 from the International Culture Appreciation and Interchange Society in Tokyo. This exhibition marks the 25th Anniversary of the Australia-Japan Friendship Treaty, and is a selection of works from the mid 1970s that reflects the interaction between traditional Japanese techniques and Western art influences.







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Baubles, Bangles & Beads: Australian Contemporary Jewellery

 Image: Sean O’Connell, Jorgumander Chain, 2005 (detail) Stainless steel, 25 x 25 x 480mm. Courtesy of the artist

Image: Sean O’Connell, Jorgumander Chain, 2005 (detail) Stainless steel, 25 x 25 x 480mm. Courtesy of the artist.

Exhibition dates: 1 November - 20 December 2006

Baubles, Bangles and Beads highlights the range, quality and inventiveness of Australian Contemporary Jewellery design, focusing on individual items borrowed from private collections shown alongside current works by the artists, sharing the passion of collecting and celebrating these highly original artists. The exhibition examines the special tripartite relationship between the jeweller, the wearer/consumer and the object. A Bathurst Regional Art Gallery Touring Exhibition, supported by Visions Australia.

List of Collectors and Jewellers

Collectors

Jewellers

  • Ann Lewis A. M., arts patron
  • Penelope Seidler, architect
  • Dr Gene Sherman, Director, Sherman Gallery
  • Peggy Wallach, performance artist
  • Kerry Crowley, Director Yuill/Crowley Gallery
  • Robert Thompson, writer
  • Margaret Pomeranz, film critic & TV presenter
  • Mandy Martin, artist
  • Paula Dawson, holographic artist
  • Erika Semler, weaver
  • Linda Jansen, rock chick and cabaret artiste
  • Stephen Cassidy, collector
  • Rhana Devenport, curator
  • Anna Volska, actor
  • Conrad Morton, heritage carpenter
  • Carlier Makigawa
  • Simryn Gill
  • Yuri Kawanabe
  • Sheridan Kennedy
  • Donna-May Bolinger
  • Jason Moss
  • Margaret Kirkwood
  • Kate Forster
  • Fiona Hall
  • Darani Lewers and Helge Larsen
  • Zara Collins
  • Rowena Gough
  • Barbara Heath
  • Robyn Gordon
  • Sean O’Conne

View Media release for Baubles, Bangles & Beads: Australian Contemporary Jewellery.

Participating artists and collectors (PDF 3.28Mb 15p)

Sponsor logos: museums and Galleries, Bathurst regional art gallery, An Australian Government Initiative - Visions of Australia

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The Idea of the Animal

 Image: Hubert Duprat Aquatic caddis-fly larva with case,(detail) 1980–2006 Photography Frédéric Delpech

Image: Hubert Duprat Aquatic caddis-fly larva with case,(detail) 1980–2006 Photography Jean-Luc Fournier.

Exhibition dates: 12 August - 18 November 2006

Animals: in all their guises, from beloved pet to prawn-on-the-barbie, it is indisputable that animals occupy an important part of human life. The Idea of the Animal is a new exhibition presented by RMIT Gallery and the Melbourne International Arts Festival which investigates the complex relationship between humans and animals in contemporary visual culture.

View Media release for The Idea of the Animal.

Public Symposium: Rethinking the Animal (PDF 150kb), Saturday 14 October 2006, 12 – 5pm.

Participating artists (PDF 100kb 5p) include:

  • Karen Abernethy (AUS)
  • Bruce Armstrong (AUS)
  • Joseph Beuys (Ger)
  • Jazmina Cininas (AUS)
  • Peter Cole (AUS)
  • Barbara Dover (AUS)
  • Marian Drew (AUS)
  • Hubert Duprat (Fr)
  • Peter Ellis (AUS)
  • Katrin Isabel Ernst (AUS)
  • Hayden Fowler (AUS)
  • Rew Hanks (AUS)
  • Kristin Headlam (AUS)
  • Kate James (AUS)
  • Nicolas Lampert (USA)
  • Linda Marrinon (AUS)
  • Kevin Mortensen (AUS)
  • David Noonan (AUS)
  • Selina Ou (AUS)
  • Diego Perrone (Italy)
  • Simon Perry (AUS)
  • Patricia Piccinini (AUS)
  • Lisa Roet (AUS)
  • Anne Ross (AUS)
  • Joan Ross (AUS)
  • Paul Ryan (AUS)
  • Angela Singer (NZ)
  • Kathy Temin (AUS)
  • Jenny Watson (AUS)

Melbourne International Arts festival logo






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Great Brits: The New Alchemists

 Michael Cross and Julie Matthias, Flood, 2004

Michael Cross and Julie Matthias, Flood, 2004.

Exhibition dates: 28 August - 23 September 2006

Great Brits: The New Alchemists showcases a new generation of designers working in Britain, sharing a passion for experimentation with new materials and technologies with an alchemical bent. Great Brits explores the development of a raw, surreal design aesthetic that transforms base objects or materials and commonplace typologies in unexpected ways.Coordinated by the British Council and curated by the Design Museum with Sir Paul Smith.

View participating artists biographies (PDF 141kb)

View Media Release for Great Brits: The New Alchemists

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Made in Germany: Architecture and Ecology

Werner Sobek Ingenieure, Stuttgart, House R 128, 1999-2000

Werner Sobek Ingenieure, Stuttgart, House R 128, 1999-2000.

Exhibition dates: 28 August – 23 September 2006

Showcasing nine building projects which demonstrate the diversity of German-designed ecological construction methods in recent years. Amongst these are factories, child-care centres, sports halls, private homes in various locations around Germany, as well as major projects such as the new construction of the central railway station in Stuttgart. Designed by the Goethe-Institut in collaboration with the Aedes gallery in Berlin.

View Media Release for Made in Germany: Architecture and Ecology

Goethe Institute logo

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Time Goes By: Rebecca Horn

 Rebecca Horn, Large Feather Wheel, 1997

Rebecca Horn, Large Feather Wheel, 1997.

Exhibition dates: 7 July – 13 August 2006

Rebecca Horn is an artist who can move an audience through laughter to deep reflection using the most unlikely of objects. Forty kilometres of developed Hollywood film, a metronome and Buster Keaton’s shoes are the materials from which German contemporary artist Rebecca Horn constructed her installation Time Goes By, the artwork that forms the centrepiece to a survey exhibition of the same name opening at RMIT Gallery on 6th July 2006.

Rebecca Horn is widely regarded as a particularly versatile and creative artist. She works across a broad variety of media – drawing, sculpture, installation, kinetics, photography and film – to create artworks that explore the relationship between the body, movement and space. Time Goes By presents a selection of her work from the 1970s to the present, with particular emphasis on the links between her sculptures and her films. A program of Horn’s films will be screened throughout the exhibition period.

Free guided tours will be available weekdays throughout the exhibition period. Please phone RMIT Gallery on 99251717 to book an appointment.

Special screenings of Rebecca Horns film may be arranged for education groups by phoning RMIT Gallery on 99251717.

View media release for Time Goes By: Rebecca Horn

An exhibition of the Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen/ Institute for Cultural Relations and the Goethe-Institut.

An exhibition of the Institut fur Auslandsbeziehungen/Institute for Cultural Relations and the Goethe-Institut.






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Black Abstract

 Ada Bird Petyarre, Engerima 2004

Ada Bird Petyarre, Engerima 2004.

Exhibition dates: 17 May - 24 June 2006

Black Abstract presents the work of renowned artists Ada Bird and Gloria Petyarre, Anmatyarr custodians who have painted the stories, symbols, patterns and their country Anungra for over twenty years.

Black Abstract continues the dialogue for people across great distances. The exhibition brings country from the central desert across lands and waters, to connect with Victorian audiences and communities.

This exhibition looks to define a sense of place and identity by affording the viewing audience greater access and understanding of Australian Indigenous art. The exhibition does not consider Aboriginal art to contain abstract meaning, rather, a more literal relationship between land, time, and artists' story.

View media release for Black Abstract

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GRUNT: RMIT, the Working Men's College & the 8 Hour Day

Courtesy of RMIT University,Photographic Collection, PH3-1-10

Courtesy of RMIT University,Photographic Collection, PH3-1-10.

Exhibition dates: 17 May - 24 June 2006

Born of workers' struggle, RMIT began its life as the Working Men's College in 1887. Building on the legacy of the Stonemason's victory in 1856, who won the right to 8 Hours Labour, 8 Hours Recreation and 8 Hours Rest, the new College made it possible for Melbourne's workers to pursue education in a night-school environment. Self-improvement through education was a high priority, and the Working Men's College prospered, offering evening courses in trades training and general education. GRUNT: RMIT, the Working Men's College & the 8 Hour Day examines the relationship between education and labour in Victoria, examining the desire of Melbourne's workers to attain education, and celebrates the crucial role they played in the successful founding and development of the Working Men's College.

View media release for Grunt

8 hour day logo: Celebrate 150









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The following exhibitions are part of Festival Melbourne 2006, the cultural festival of the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games.

Festival Melbourne2006 celebrates the breadth of culture and art from across the nations of the Commonwealth. The Festival is an integral part of the Melbourne 2006 Commonwealth Games, and is proudly funded and supported by the Victorian and Australian Governments.

Threading the Commonwealth: Textile Tradition, Culture, Trade and Politics

 Egùngùn, Yoruba masquerade garment, Yorubaland, Nigeria, c. 1950’s onwards. Mixed media. Collection of Mr Gert Chesi, Haus der Völker, Austria

Egùngùn, Yoruba masquerade garment, Yorubaland, Nigeria, c. 1950’s onwards. Mixed media. Collection of Mr Gert Chesi, Haus der Völker, Austria.

Exhibition dates: 1 March - 30 April 2006

This exhibition comprises a survey of textiles from the majority of nations that make up the Commonwealth. Consisting of key historical and contemporary works, the collection demonstrates how various traditional and visual languages have transformed over time. It also provides an opportunity for the differences and similarities between the constituent nations of the Commonwealth to be explored while examining a range of issues.

The exhibition will tell two grand stories common across these diverse cultures while celebrating the courses of human histories and experiences. Firstly the ceremonially significant textiles in display of power - the Power Cloths - worn by key figures in the nations of the Commonwealth, ranging from a state gown belonging to Queen Victoria to the Melbourne Lord Mayor John So’s Aboriginal possum cloak. The second story concerns garments and textiles used in the Rites of Passage - from birth, circumcision, marriage to death and all that comes in between. RMIT Storey Hall facade will be transformed by cloths woven from gold and silver thread.









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medalling: 8 designers on a quest

Vicki Mason, Commonwealth native wreath (2005). Hand-dyed PVC (tree guard sleeves), silk, 9ct yellow gold, 22ct yellow gold plated sterling silver. 40x40x2.5cm.

Vicki Mason, Commonwealth native wreath (2005). Hand-dyed PVC (tree guard sleeves), silk, 9ct yellow gold, 22ct yellow gold plated sterling silver. 40x40x2.5cm.

Exhibition dates: 1 March - 30 April 2006

A medallist is a designer of medals. A Commonwealth Games medallist is on a quest for a medal of gold, silver or bronze. ‘Medalling’ is the quest, a parallel sporting and creative endeavour, combining raw talent, aspiration, skill, knowledge and perseverance in preparation and presentation. The Games is also an arena for cultural exchange and the honouring of shared values and a history. Eight designers have explored diverse cultural, historical and social messages in their commissioned artworks. The role of medals, ribbons, wreaths and trophies in awarding merit and victory; materials and symbols as signifiers of hierarchy in achievement and the rich mix of the Games participants’ cultural allegiances were the starting points for the artworks.

The Artists are:

  • Ian Bonde
  • Pearl Gillies
  • Stephen Gallagher
  • Vicky Mason
  • Anne Neil
  • Belinda Newick
  • Ilke White
  • Shine Myung-Ok Shin

Curated by Katherine Wilkinson









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Canopy of the Commonwealth: Linking Victorian Communities

Detail of Canopy of the Commonwealth.

Detail of Canopy of the Commonwealth. Piece by Vasanti Visa

Exhibition dates: 1 March - 30 April 2006

Also at RMIT Gallery, the Canopy of the Commonwealth is a community participation project that brings together textile work by people from across Victoria in a display of skill that reflects the different and diverse communities living in the state of Victoria.

Participants of all cultural backgrounds and varying abilities of textile proficiency have submitted panels that have been screen printed, embroidered, stitched, appliquéd, painted, or in some other way embellished and then joined together in a large canopy that drapes the ceiling of the gallery foyer.









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