Referencing guides for printing

Here is a selection of our referencing guides available for downloading and printing.

Need help with academic writing?

If you need help using references in your assignments and essays, contact your teacher or the Learning Skills Advisor. Visit the Study and Learning Centre website for more information.

RMIT HARVARD (including RMIT Business)

Harvard is an author-date referencing style widely accepted in scholarly circles. Each reference is indicated in the text by the author and date of the publication cited, sometimes with added information, such as page numbers. The full details of these references are listed at the end of the text in a Reference list. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

* Harvard referencing examples (DOCX, 53 KB, 7 pages); updated August 2016

College of Business: Guidelines for referencing and presentation in written reports and essays (RTF, 1,286 KB, 52 pages); updated April 2012

* RMIT Vietnam Harvard referencing guide with examples (PDF, 7,270 KB, 88 pages); updated 2013

The above guides are based on the latest, 6th edition of the Style manual for authors, editors and printers published in 2002.

See also:

APA (American Psychological Association)

APA is an author-date referencing style produced by the American Psychological Association. Initially developed for the social sciences, it is used by a number of disciplines. There have been several editions of the Publication Manual, the aim of which is to aid authors in the preparation of manuscripts. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

* APA referencing examples (DOCX, 134 KB, 16 pages); updated February 2017

The above APA guides are based on the latest, 6th edition of the Publication manual of the American Psychological Association published in 2010.

See also:

VANCOUVER (International Committee for Medical Journal Editors)

Vancouver is a numbered referencing style that is predominantly used in the medical field. It follows rules established by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors. It is also known as: Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals. Each source is given the same number each time it is referred to in the work. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

Vancouver Quick Guide (DOC, 46 KB, 2 pages); updated September 2012

See also:

CHICAGO

Chicago is a referencing style developed by the University of Chicago. It offers two different types of referencing, either: (a) a footnotes-bibliography style, or (b) an author-date style. Our guide provides examples using the footnotes-bibliography style. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

Chicago Quick Guide (RTF, 80 KB, 2 pages); updated December 2007

See also:

IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)

The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) citation style is a numbered referencing style used in electrical, electronic and computing publications. IEEE provides instructions for authors for each type of publication such as journals, magazines, newsletters, and standards. References are numbered in the order of appearance in the article, not in alphabetical order. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

IEEE Quick Guide (RTF, 104 KB, 2 pages); updated September 2012

See also:

MLA (Modern Languages Association of America)

The MLA referencing style was developed by the Modern Languages Association of America (MLA). The organisation was founded in 1883, when modern languages were beginning to gain a place in the curriculum alongside the classical languages – ancient Greek and Latin. The MLA Handbook originated over fifty years ago being first published as the “MLA Style Sheet” in 1951.

The MLA Style Center is a free companion to the MLA Handbook. You can submit your own questions, get instructions on formatting research papers and use tools for creating works-cited-list entries.

Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

AGLC (Australian Guide to Legal Citation)

The Australian Guide to Legal Citation (AGLC) is a required referencing style for students enrolled in the Juris Doctor program at RMIT University. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

The AGLC 3rd edition (2010) is published by the Melbourne University Law Review Association Inc. in collaboration with the Melbourne Journal of International Law Inc.

See also Legal Research Methods – Referencing library subject guide.

ACS (American Chemical Society)

ACS is a referencing style produced by the American Chemical Society. It offers two different types of referencing, either; (a) a numbered style, or (b) an author-date style. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

AIP (American Institute of Physics)

AIP is a numbered referencing style produced by the American Institute of Physics. References are numbered in the order of appearance in the article and listed in that order at the end of the article. Always follow information given to you by your lecturer regarding referencing.

Easy Cite
referencing tool

Don't lose marks! Use our Easy Cite referencing tool to see how to paraphrase, quote and cite sources of information in the referencing styles used at RMIT.

Go to Easy Cite