RMIT University

Course Title: Unix Essentials for System Administrators

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Unix Essentials for System Administrators

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

COSC2412

City Campus

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014

COSC2425

City Campus

Postgraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014

Course Coordinator: Assoc. Prof. James Thom

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2992

Course Coordinator Email: james.thom@rmit.edu.au


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

Before starting this course, you should complete the Lab and Unix Induction program. For more information, go to the following link: www.rmit.edu.au/compsci/orientation

You should have some basic awareness of the role of a file-system in the management of data in computer systems. You should understand that the running of all programs in computer systems is under the control of the operating system. You should understand that a computer program is essentially a sequential series of instructions that tell a computer system how to perform a task. You should be prepared to make regular attendance at lectures workshops and laboratory sessions a priority. 


Course Description

This course introduces students to use the UNIX command line and common development tools at an advanced level. We will cover essential background knowledge about process management, frequently used UNIX commands, and system management tools that are required for effective troubleshooting and fault resolution in modern UNIX systems. In addition, students will become proficient in text editing, shell scripting, inter process communication using pipes, input / output redirection, file processing and common configuration procedures.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

This course contributes to the development of the following graduate capabilities:

Enabling Knowledge: The operation, implementation, and configuration of UNIX operating systems.
Problem Solving: Ability to design and implement efficient automation tasks in a UNIX environment.
Critical Analysis: Ability to analyse and solve common problems in UNIX user environments.
Communication: Ability to explain efficient UNIX system concepts, relevant alternatives and decision recommendations, in written form, to IT specialists and computer scientists.
Responsibility: Ability to apply relevant standards and ethical considerations to the design and implementation of efficient software solutions.


On successful completion of this course, you should be able to describe the UNIX philosophy with respect to the design of programs and systems and effectively automate common tasks in a UNIX programming environment.

The key learning outcomes are:
 


Overview of Learning Activities

This course consists of lectures, tutorials, and laboratory classes.

Key concepts will be explained in lectures, classes or online, where syllabus material will be presented and the subject matter will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples.

Tutorials, labs and group discussions (including online forums) focused on projects and problem solving will provide practice in the application of theory and procedures, allow exploration of concepts with teaching staff and other students, and give feedback on your progress and understanding; assignments, as described in Overview of Assessment (below), requiring an integrated understanding of the subject matter; and private study, working through the course as presented in classes and learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and technical problems.


Overview of Learning Resources

You will make extensive use of computer laboratories and relevant software provided by the School. You will be able to access course information and learning materials through MyRMIT and may be provided with copies of additional materials in class or via email. Lists of relevant reference texts, resources in the library and freely accessible Internet sites will be provided.

 


Overview of Assessment

The assessment for this course is in three parts: assignments, a class test and a formal written examination.  The final examination will assess your ability to explain the key concepts discussed in the lectures, tutorials and laboratory sessions. You will be expected to develop and expand on the relationships between these concepts to achieve a grade of Distinction or higher.

For standard assessment details, including hurdle requirements, relating to Computer Science and IT courses see: http://www.rmit.edu.au/compsci/cgi