Course Title: Food Chemistry

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Food Chemistry

Credit Points: 12.00


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

CHEM1083

City Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015

CHEM1226

City Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015

Course Coordinator: Dr Darryl M Small

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2124

Course Coordinator Email: darryl.small@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: Room 3.2.17

Course Coordinator Availability: by appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

There are no prerequisites for this subject.


Course Description

CHEM 1083 (UGRD) / CHEM1226 (PGRD) (Food Chemistry) is a one-semester course that focuses on the structure, function, stability and analysis of the molecules in foods. This emphasises components that play a role during food processing as well as those contributing to product quality and safety, including food additives, processing aids, micronutrients, and toxins. It provides direct experience in measurement of food components using a variety of methods particularly those based on the operation of analytical instrumentation. To complement the practical skills, you will also gain an understanding of the principles of analysis and experience in accessing and handling data, interpretation and presentation. You will work individually and in small teams, and hence this course develops your skills in responsibility, teamwork and leadership, negotiation, allocation of time and resources, as well as communication. Finally, you will present your results as formal reports, further developing your skills in written communication.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On completion of this course you should be able to:

  1. Demonstrate depth and breadth of knowledge in food chemistry by demonstrating a knowledge of, and applying, the principles and concepts of chemistry as they apply to food systems.
  2. Develop an understanding of the principles whereby food molecules can be selected for use as ingredients in food formulations and the related factors that might be controlled during to enhance product quality.
  3. Investigate and solve qualitative and quantitative problems in food chemistry, both individually and in teams, by synthesising and evaluating information from a range of sources, including traditional and emerging information technologies and
  4. Design and undertake practical food analysis in a safe and responsible
  5. Calculate, evaluate, interpret and present analytical results obtained during practical food analysis.


The emphasis will be on the decision making processes required in the selection of appropriate ingredients in order to achieve the particular sensory attributes during the processing of foods. This will incorporate the need for a clear definition of the objectives, critical thinking, accessing of relevant background material and data along with the current regulatory sources for the application. This course contributes to the B. Science Program Learning Outcomes at AQF Level 7:

 PLO-1 Coherent understanding of science

  • PLO-1.2 You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of the role and relevance of Food Science in
  • PLO-1.3 You will demonstrate an understanding of the role and importance of evidence in the continuous evolution of scientific
  • PLO-1.4 You will demonstrate an understanding of the significance of food science and nutrition to society

 PLO-2 Scientific knowledge

  • PLO-2.2 You will demonstrate an ability to implement the principles and practices that underpins product development, food processing and preservation, ingredients interaction, and quality
  • PLO-2.4 You will demonstrate an ability to apply quality assurance principles to food manufacture and molecular interactions in food, and /or an understanding of dietary guidelines and relevant regulatory standards

PLO-3 Inquiry, problem solving and critical thinking

  • PLO-3.1 You will be able to investigate and solve qualitative and quantitative problems in the chemical sciences, both individually and in teams, by synthesising and evaluating information from a range of sources, including traditional and emerging information technologies and
  • PLO-3.2 You will be able to gather, critically review and synthesise information relevant to a scientific inquiry or research project in food

PLO-4 Communication

  • PLO-4.1 You will be able to communicate chemical knowledge by presenting information, effectively communicating scientific results, information or arguments, in a variety of modes, to diverse audiences, and for a range of purposes

PLO-5 Personal and professional responsibility

  • PLO-5.4 You will develop an ability to work collaboratively

This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes at AQF Level 9 for:

Masters coursework programs including:

  • MC237 – Master of Food Science and Technology
  • MC111 – Master of Biotechnology
  • PLO2: Advanced skills to critically analyse and solve problems in food science and technology
  • PLO3: Application of knowledge and skills
  • PLO4: Communication
  • PLO5: Personal and professional responsibility

 


Overview of Learning Activities

The learning activities included in this course are:

  • Lectures where syllabus material will be presented and explained, and the subject will be illustrated with practical examples;
  • Revision and tutorial questions as well as assignments to develop deeper understanding of lecture materials. Providing opportunities to use a wide range of information sources and for feedback on student progress and understanding;
  • Laboratory analyses of foods including both traditional approaches as well as using analytical instrumentation.
  • A short food analysis project to be selected by the student, designed to give further practice in analysis and data interpretation. A report on the results from the project will develop communication skills.
  • Private study, working through the course as presented in classes as well as learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and numerical problems.

Total study hours:

Teacher guided hours (laboratory classes and lectures): approximately 48 hours per semester

Learner directed hours (reviewing lecture material, analysis of laboratory results, preparing laboratory reports and assignments, working on tutorial questions) : 60 hrs per semester


Overview of Learning Resources

Lecture notes and presentations for the course will be available through myRMIT as well as course information and other learning materials. There are no recommended textbooks for this course, however, lists of relevant reference texts, resources in the library and freely accessible internet sites will be provided. Details of the key recommended reference sources for this course are provided in part B of the course guide.


Overview of Assessment

Note that:

☒This course has no hurdle requirements.

Assessment task 1: laboratory reports

You will participate in practical sessions and these will include carrying out an analysis project. These activities culminate in submission of scientific and/or technical reports.

Early assessment task: the first laboratory report submitted will be your early assessment task.

Weighting: 40%

This assessment task supports CLOs: 2, 3, 4, and 5

 

Assessment task 2: problem solving assignments

You will learn to access reliable information and critically evaluate scientific and technical sources. These will be used for solving problems relevant to the role, significance, structure-function relationships and selection of food molecules particularly including additives, processing aids and other functional food components.

Weighting: 20%

This assessment task supports CLOs: 3, 4, and 5

 

Assessment task 3: tests and examination

You will complete short-answer tests during semester and a two hour written examination. The final examination at the end of the semester will be closed book.

Weighting: 40%

This assessment task supports CLOs: 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5

Please note: Postgraduates will be expected to a greater breadth and depth of understanding in the assignments.