Course Title: Airport Management

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Airport Management

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

AERO2241

Air Transport Training College

Postgraduate

115H Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering

Distance / Correspondence

Offsh 3 07,
Offsh 2 08,
Offsh 3 08

AERO2308

City Campus

Postgraduate

115H Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering

Distance / Correspondence

Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010

AERO2308

City Campus

Postgraduate

115H Aerospace, Mechanical & Manufacturing Engineering

Distance / Correspondence or Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010

Course Coordinator: Margaret Tein

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9926150

Course Coordinator Email: tein@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 251.3.26

Course Coordinator Availability: Please contact by email to arrange appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

A study of the management and operation of public use airports. More specifically, the study of airport management styles, sources of revenues and expenses, management of passenger and cargo terminal buildings. Ground handling of passengers and baggage, ground access systems, and current problems with environmental impact, land-use planning and control, airport capacity and delay, public relations, airport finance, airport privatization, liability, and economic impact will be covered.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

The Capabilities Of An Aviation Management Graduate – Post Graduate Level


Overall Integrative Capability: Proactive Problem Identification, Innovative Problem Solving and Empowering Communication

CAPABILITY: Responsible and Professional Work Practices: Work within the ethical and legal framework of the industry while contributing to professional work settings through responsible, self-managed, independent work and effective participation in multidisciplinary teams.

Dimension of Capability: Personal Development

Descriptor:

  • Awareness of and commitment to one’s own set of values.
  • Observance of professional ethics.
  • Taking responsibility and participating in one’s own career planning and development.
  • Acting as a Reflective Practitioner leading to a personal continuous improvement process.
  • Engagement in and commitment to career-long learning.

Awareness of and commitment to one’s own set of values.

Dimension of Capability: Sustainability

Descriptor:

  • Balance of the technical, economic, environmental and social demands of an industry-based situation.
  • Protection of safety, health and welfare.

Dimension of Capability: Problem solving and decision making

Descriptor:

  • Model organizational problems using a systems framework, recognising the impact on sub- and related systems.
  • Use of a wide range of problem solving tools and techniques.
  • Selectivity in the choice of data to be used to support decision-making.
  • Access to information from a wide range of sources, discerning values, bias and usability.

Model organizational problems using a systems framework, recognising the impact on sub- and related systems.

Dimension of Capability: Technical Competence

  • Conceptualise, plan, design and manage the interface between human and technical systems.
  • Perform a range of analytical tasks as appropriate to the specialization within the industry.
  • Design and conduct diagnostic activities within the specific industry discipline.

Dimension of Capability: Teamwork and Leadership

  • Operate effectively within a complex organisational setting.
  • Manage multiple hierarchical relationships.
  • Work effectively within a team.
  • Exhibit appropriate and effective professional behaviours in the team environment.
  • Provide constructive feedback to colleagues.
  • Resolve conflict within the team.
  • Work with members of other disciplines in a team with conflicting needs.

Dimension of Capability: Communication

  • Communicate effectively - that is to listen, observe, speak, and write.
  • Communicate results and outcomes qualitatively, quantitatively, graphically, electronically and textually.
  • Communicate processes of thinking and reflection.

CAPABILITY: Global perspective

Locate one’s professional practice within the global parameters of the industry recognizing the different cultural perspectives, national and local variations in legal, industrial and economic environments.

Dimension of Capability: Personal Development

  • Awareness of and respect for other’s sets of values.
  • Observance of professional ethics.
  • Taking responsibility for understanding cultural differences.
  • Acting as a Reflective Practitioner leading to a personal continuous improvement process.
  • Engagement in and commitment to career-long learning.

Dimension of Capability: Sustainability

  • Balance of the technical, economic, environmental and social demands of different cultural and national situations.
  • Protection of safety, health and welfare.

Dimension of Capability: Problem-solving and decision-making

  • Model organizational problems using a systems framework, recognising the impact on sub- and related systems within different cultural contexts.
  • Use of a wide range of problem solving tools and techniques.
  • Selectivity in the choice of data to be used to support decision-making.
  • Access to information from a wide range of sources, discerning values, bias and usability.

Dimension of Capability: Technical Competence

  • Conceptualise, plan, design and manage the interface between human and technical systems taking into consideration variations in local technical adoption rates.
  • Perform a range of analytical tasks as appropriate to the specialization within the industry.
  • Design and conduct diagnostic activities within the specific industry discipline and cultural context.

Dimension of Capability: Teamwork and Leadership

  • Operate effectively within a complex organisational setting.
  • Manage multiple hierarchical relationships.
  • Work effectively within a multicultural team.
  • Exhibit appropriate and effective professional behaviours in the multicultural team environment.
  • Provide constructive feedback to colleagues.
  • Resolve conflict within the multicultural team.
  • Work with members of other disciplines in a team with conflicting needs.

Dimension of Capability: Communication

  • Communicate effectively - that is to listen, observe, speak, and write appropriately within the cultural context.
  • Communicate results and outcomes qualitatively, quantitatively, graphically, electronically and textually.
  • Communicate processes of thinking and reflection.

CAPABILITY: Communication and Personal Engagement

Communicate the processes and results of organisational activities within the industrial sectors’ communities in forms consistent with the appropriate sector practices. Extend relationships through confident interactions across various levels and functions of the organisation and the industry’s sectors.

Dimension of Capability: Personal Development

  • Awareness of and respect for divergent views.
  • Observance of professional ethics.
  • Taking responsibility for ones’ own communication style and responses of others to it.
  • Acting as a Reflective Practitioner leading to a personal continuous improvement process.
  • Engagement in and commitment to career-long learning.

Dimension of Capability: Sustainability

  • Balance of the technical, economic, environmental and social demands of different cultural and personal backgrounds.
  • Protection of safety, health and welfare.

Dimension of Capability: Problem-solving and decision-making

  • Explain organizational problems and associated solutions within a systems framework, recognising the impact on individuals and groups with different perspectives and views.
  • Use a wide range of problem solving tools and techniques.
  • Selectivity in the choice of data to be used to support decision-making.
  • Access to information from a wide range of sources, discerning values, bias and usability.

Dimension of Capability: Technical Competence

  • Professionally communicate the conceptualisation, planning, design and management of the interface between human and technical systems taking into consideration variations in personal technical adoption rates.
  • Discuss the performance of a range of analytical tasks as appropriate to the specialisation within the industry.
  • Participate in the design and conduct diagnostic activities within the specific industry discipline and cultural context.

Dimension of Capability: Teamwork and Leadership

  • Communicate effectively and collaboratively within a complex organisational setting.
  • Manage multiple hierarchical relationships.
  • Work effectively within a multicultural team.
  • Facilitate effective and appropriate interactions between colleagues and subordinates across the organisation hierarchy.
  • Provide constructive feedback to colleagues.
  • Resolve conflict within the multicultural team.
  • Work with members of other disciplines in a team with conflicting needs.

Dimension of Capability: Communication

  • Communicate effectively - that is to listen, observe, speak, and write appropriately within the cultural context.
  • Communicate results and outcomes qualitatively, quantitatively, graphically, electronically and textually.
  • Communicate processes of thinking and reflection.


By the end of this course students will be able to:

1. Construct an organisational chart representing the management structure and organisation for an airport authority.

2. Identify and explain the kinds of activities normally handled by airport operations staff.

3. Evaluate the public relations concerns of airport managers.

4. Compare and contrast the various airport types and roles.

5. Evaluate airport master planning process and its objectives.

6. Compare and contrast the difference between economic impact and cost/benefit studies and their applications.

7. Assess sources of funding for airports and airport funding policies.

8. Compare and contrast the different types of airport use agreements, and sources of airport revenues and expenses. Develop an airport annual budget.

9. Assess some of the important aspects of monitoring airport performance and efficiency.

10. Evaluate the nature of the ground access problem at large airports.

11. Evaluate how airport capacity and delays are measured.

12. Understand the important airport operational activities including ground handing, baggage handing, and terminal operations.

13. Understand airport security requirements and aircraft emergency procedures.

14. Assess the airport technique roles

15. Identify the major environmental impact issues faced by airports, particularly noise issues, and the applicable regulatory requirements and argue advantages/disadvantages.


Overview of Learning Activities

The focal strategy utilised in the whole course is the Management Learning Team (MLT). This group represents a project team whose members carry a dual responsibility. Firstly, MLT members carry a responsibility to the team for the learning and development of each member, and secondly, a responsibility for their own personal learning.

MLT’s are encouraged to explore the resources of the team for problem solving and addressing issues prior to seeking the guidance or assistance of an academic staff member.

The specific learning activities include:

Seminars
Workshops
On-call Consultation
Projects
Directed Research
Self-directed Learning
Fieldwork


Overview of Learning Resources

Text and References:

Whilst there is no specific text set for this course. A range of relevant books are recommended in the references.

Reference Materials:

Ashford, N., Stanton, H. and Moore, C. 1997, Airport Operations, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Dempsey, P. 2000, Airport Planning and Development Handbook: A Global Survey, McGraw-Hill, New York.
Doganis, R. 1992, The Airport Business, Routledge, London.
Horonjeff, R. & Mckeley, F. 1983, Planning and Design of Airports, McGraw-Hill, New York.
ICAO 1991, Airport Economics Manual, International Civil Aviation Organization, Montreal.
ICAO 1997, Airport Operations Manual, International Civil Aviation Organization, Montreal.
O’Connor, W. 1985, An Introduction to Airline Economics, Praeger, New York.
Pedoe, N., Raper, D. & Holden, J. 1996, Environmental Management at Airport, Telford, London.
Profit, R.1995, Systematic Safety Management in the Air Traffic Services, Evromoney, London.
Richardon, J., Rodwell, J. and Baty, P. 1995, Essentials of Aviation Management: A Guide for Fixed Base Operators, Kendall/Hunt, Dubuque.
Seneviratne, P. 1996, Meeting the Challenge: Rebuilding Inner City Airports, procedings of the 24th International Air Transportation Conference , Published by the American Society of Civil Engineers, New York.
Wells, A. T. 1996, Airport Planning & Management, McGraw-Hill, New York.

Electronic Resources:

• http://www.airportnet.org/
• http://aci-na.org
• http://amelia.db.erau.edu - Aviation Week Group Newsletter
• http://www.atwonline.com - Air Transport World

Journals:

• Airport International
• Aviation Week


Overview of Assessment

Work Integrated Learning:

This course complies with the University’s WIL policy in that the courseware and assessment tasks were designed and developed by an industry practitioner to demonstrate current best practice. Furthermore all teaching and assessment is carried out by an industry practitioner teaching part time for the Program. Assessment tasks are focused on linking and applying theory studied to a real organisational problem or issue.

Face to face and Distance Delivery Mode Assessment Tasks:

Application Paper - 30% weighting - 1,500 to 2,000 words
Formal Report  - 45% weighting - 4,000 words
Article Analysis - 25% weighting - 1,000 words