Course Title: Coding for Reliable Communications

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Coding for Reliable Communications

Credit Points: 12.00


Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

INTE1124

City Campus

Postgraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2006,
Sem 1 2007,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016

INTE1124

City Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017

INTE2090

City Campus

Undergraduate

145H Mathematical & Geospatial Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2007,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2008,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016

INTE2090

City Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017

Course Coordinator: Dr Graham Clarke

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 3225

Course Coordinator Email: graham.clarke@rmit.edu.au


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

INTE1120 Introduction to Information Security and INTE1122 Case Studies in Information Security are pre-requisites or co-requisites for this course.


Course Description

Reliability is an essential feature of any effective communication. This course builds on the information security overview presented in INTE1120 Introduction to Information Security and INTE1122 Case Studies. It introduces a rigorous study of error-correction coding. The use of the correct coding scheme is imperative in ensuring integrity, which is an information security primitive. Error correcting and detecting codes used for computers and communications will be studied. Topics covered in this course include mathematical background, the communication channel, Reed-Muller Codes, parity check codes, cyclic codes, Hamming codes and compression coding.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On completion of this course you should be able to:


1. Identify the mathematical structures required for describing a given code.
2. Use polynomial arithmetic for design and analysis of codes.
3. Quantify the performance of codes as a function of fundamental parameters.
4. Elaborate the relationship between the matrix and polynomial description of codes.
5. Contrast the features of nonlinear, linear and cyclic error-correcting codes and compression codes.
6. Discuss the place of ethics in the field of Information Security.
 


This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for MC159 Master of Applied Science (Information Security and Assurance)

International Orientation and Strategic Thinking

• Graduates will have a strategic and practical overview of the issues in information security and assurance.

Critical Analysis and Problem Solving

• Evaluate information security risks across diverse service settings including the Internet and WWW based commerce systems, high bandwidth digital communications and funds transfer services,
• Undertake professional careers or postgraduate research in information security or other IT related fields, acquiring the required information needed to identify real world solutions to real world information security problems.

Communication

• Graduates will have the ability to communicate both technical and non-technical material in a range of forms (written, electronic, graphic, oral) and to tailor the style and means of communication to different audiences.

Ethical Values
• Graduates will exhibit an ability to appreciate the ethical considerations that inform judgments and decision making in academic and professional settings.


Overview of Learning Activities

Key concepts and their application will be explained and illustrated (with many examples) in lectures and in online notes. Computer laboratory sessions will enable you to use technology to help solve problems in coding.  Online homework exercises will build your capacity to solve problems, to think critically and analytically and provide feedback on your comprehension and academic progress. These exercises will also provide a focus for your private study.

Face –to face contact: 2 - 3 hours of lectures weekly, based on the online lecture material uploaded to Blackboard. There will be 3 laboratory sessions of 1 hour duration each, in Weeks 3, 7 and 10.
In addition, you can expect to spend between 4 and 6 hours per week on independent study and research of the material assigned for the week.


Overview of Learning Resources

You will be expected to expand on the subject matter provided as lecture notes in class and on Blackboard. You will access various external and internal resources, such as the RMIT Library and the Internet. A bibliography for text and reference books will be provided in class. Your classmates and lecturer are also important learning resources. You will have access to computer laboratories where Maple software is available to help you solve problems in coding.


Overview of Assessment

This course has no hurdle requirements.

Assessment Tasks:

Assessment Task 1:  Class Tests
Weighting 35%
This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Three class tests at regular intervals. Each test assesses a precise part of the course. Sample test items will be provided on Blackboard.

Assessment Task 2:  Maple Assignments
Weighting 15%
This assessment task supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
Three Maple assignments at regular intervals. This assessment allows you to automate the coding techniques learnt in class.

Assessment Task 3:  Final Exam 
Weighting 50% 
This assessment supports CLOs 1, 2, 3, 4, 5