Course Title: Scripting Language Programming

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Scripting Language Programming

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

COSC1092

City Campus

Postgraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

COSC1093

City Campus

Undergraduate

140H Computer Science & Information Technology

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 1 2010,
Sem 1 2011,
Sem 1 2012,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016

Course Coordinator: Dr. Falk Scholer

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 9831

Course Coordinator Email: falk.scholer@rmit.edu.au


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

Ability to write substantial computer programs in Java or C or PHP, equivalent to a result of CR or better in one of these courses:
 

  • COSC2391/2401 Software Architecture: Design and Implementation OR COSC1295 Advanced Programming (formerly Java for Programmers) OR COSC1284 Programming Techniques OR former Programming 2
     
  • OR COSC1076 Advanced Programming Techniques (formerly Programming Techniques)
     
  • OR COSC2413/2426 Web Programming 

Note it is a condition of enrolment at RMIT that you accept responsibility for ensuring that you have completed the prerequisite/s and agree to concurrently enrol in co-requisite courses before enrolling in a course.

For your information the RMIT Course Requisites policy can be found at Course requisites – 7.29.1.6: http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=twx09y07zi1c


Course Description

Scripting languages require very different style of programming than system programming languages such as C or Java. Scripting languages are typically used for "gluing" applications together. Scripting languages are often typeless and usually provide methods for higher level of programming and more rapid development of applications than typical system programming languages. This course provides an introduction to the script programming paradigm, and introduces and compares a range of scripting languages used for Unix and Web-based applications.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

Relevant program capabilities are embedded in the learning outcomes for this course. In meeting these learning outcomes you will gain or improve your capabilities in:

Enabling Knowledge: effectively apply knowledge of Perl and Python to new situations and learn from the experience.
Critical Analysis: examine and consider accurately and objectively any topic, evidence, or situation. More specifically:
 

  • Analyse requirements of software systems for the purpose of determining the suitability of implementing in Perl or Python;
  • Analyse and model requirements and constraints for the purpose of designing and implementing software systems in Perl and Python;
  • Evaluate and compare designs of such systems on the basis of specific requirements and constraints.

Problem Solving: analyse problems and synthesise suitable solutions. Specifically:
 

  • Design and implement Perl and Python software solutions that accommodate specified requirements and constraints, based on analysis or modelling or requirements specification.


Upon completing this course you should be able to:
- explain the differences between typical scripting languages and typical system and application programming languages.
- apply your knowledge of the strengths and weaknesses of scripting languages to select an implementation language.
- create software systems using scripting languages, including Perl and Python.
- write server-side scripts using Perl and Python’s CGI facilities 
 


Overview of Learning Activities

The learning activities included in this course are:

• key concepts will be explained in lectures, classes or online, where syllabus material will be presented and the subject matter will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples;
• tutorials and/or labs and/or group discussions (including online forums) focussed on projects and problem solving will provide practice in the application of theory and procedures, allow exploration of concepts with teaching staff and other students, and give feedback on your progress and understanding; 
• assignments, as described in Overview of Assessment (below), requiring an integrated understanding of the subject matter; and
• private study, working through the course as presented in classes and learning materials, and gaining practice at solving conceptual and technical problems.
 


Overview of Learning Resources

You will make extensive use of computer laboratories and relevant software provided by the School. You will be able to access course information and learning materials through myRMIT and may be provided with copies of additional materials in class or via email. Lists of relevant reference texts, resources in the library and freely accessible Internet sites will be provided.

Use the RMIT Bookshop’s textbook list search page to find any recommended textbook(s).


 


Overview of Assessment

The assessment for this course comprises practical work involving the development of computer programs, class tests, and a final exam.

For standard assessment details, including hurdle requirements, relating to Computer Science and IT courses see: http://www.rmit.edu.au/compsci/cgi