Course Title: Integrating Health and Planning

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Integrating Health and Planning

Credit Points: 12

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ARCH1312

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2008

ARCH1312

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face or Internet

Sem 1 2012

ARCH1327

City Campus

Undergraduate

330H Social Science & Planning

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2006

ARCH1327

City Campus

Undergraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2008,
Sem 1 2012

Flexible Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ARCH1312

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

PGRDFx2019 (ISV),

PGRDFx2019 (All)

Course Coordinator: Andrew Butt

Course Coordinator Phone: +(61 3) 9925 3351

Course Coordinator Email: andrew.butt@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 8.7.28

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None.


Course Description

In the urban age, the health and wellbeing of humanity will be determined by the liveability, sustainability and productivity of its cities. A growing body of Australian and international evidence demonstrates that urban design is inextricably linked with public health.

This subject explores the links between urban planning and health, such as physical activity, diets, social interaction, and air quality, to identify strategies for how urban planning, design and policy can contribute to creating healthier communities. This subject identifies the complexity of health risk factors in cities and invites students to think about variation in these by different geographic and demographic groups.

The subject draws on theory, spatial data analysis, case studies and the current policy and legislative framework in Victoria and Australia. Students will learn to assess the health and social impacts of planning and design decisions and identify urban policy responses to protect and promote health and wellbeing.

 

 


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

 

This subject will contribute to the development of the following generic skills:

 

  • Ability to use a wide range of research tools, methods and strategies to generate new knowledge and inform decision-making in urban planning and environment contexts;
  • Development of communication and technical research skills to justify and interpret theoretical findings, and professional decisions to diverse audiences including policy makers and practitioners as well as non-professional audiences;
  • Critical analysis and reflection on the interplay of economic, political, social, cultural and ecological factors in urban planning and apply to scholarly and professional practice.

 


On completion of this subject, students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the broader theories and determinants of health, contemporary public health challenges, and their relationship with the built environment;
  • Critically analyse policy examples and/or guidelines applicable to public health and urban planning;
  • Understand how spatial data can be used to plan for health and wellbeing and explore health associations in cities and how these vary geographically and demographically
  • Develop planning interventions, including health impact assessments, for improving the health of communities 


Overview of Learning Activities

Learning activities include lectures (face to face or available online) and structured discussions. If you are studying online structured discussions will be conducted at specific times online through Canvas and/or other communication tools.

Structured discussions are based on your readings of key texts, in which you will explore some specific aspects of theories, answering questions and relating the theories and concepts to planning and environmental policy practices, referring to your own personal and professional experiences as appropriate.

RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems. A list of recommended learning resources will be provided by your lecturer, including books, journal articles and web resources. You will also be expected to seek further resources relevant to the focus of your own learning.

 

 

 


Overview of Learning Resources

Articles and other relevant information, including website referrals, will be available from the course Canvas online learning resources accessible via myRMIT


Overview of Assessment

There are three main items of assessment:

  1. A class presentation based on the course topics and readings (20%);
  2. A briefing paper that would convince decision-makers to follow a specific strategy for addressing a threat to population health that you identify. (30%); and
  3. A Health Impact Assessment report based on site assessment and planning proposal analysis (50%).

 

You will be assessed on the above learning outcomes and graduate capabilities. Feedback will be provided throughout the semester in class and/or online discussions, through individual feedback on practical exercises and by individual consultation. If you have a long-term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.

A student charter http://www.rmit.edu.au/about/studentcharter summarises your responsibilities as an RMIT student as well as those of your teachers.

Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions which are available for review online: http://www1.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=c15i3ciaq8ca