Course Title: Soundscape Studies

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Soundscape Studies

Credit Points: 12


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

ARCH1317

City Campus

Undergraduate

315H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 1 2013

ARCH1317

City Campus

Undergraduate

320H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2014,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Sem 1 2016,
Sem 2 2016

ARCH1318

City Campus

Postgraduate

315H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 1 2013

ARCH1318

City Campus

Postgraduate

320H Architecture & Design

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2014,
Sem 1 2016,
Sem 2 2016,
Sem 1 2017

Course Coordinator: Jeffrey Hannam

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 9785

Course Coordinator Email: jeffrey.hannam@rmit.edu.au


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

This is a course of study for participants from diverse disciplines, to investigate the nexus of listener experience, aural cultural and acoustic environments. The Soundscape Studies elective is designed to broaden your knowledge and skills by examining a range of concepts associated with sound, listening and acoustic environments.

This course is divided into two main sections. The first section provides learning opportunities to understand the core principles of soundscape studies. The second will apply these principles to enacting some change on an actual acoustic environment, and use the results of subjective listener tests and objective measurement to understand real-world issues. This course will extend your knowledge and understanding of sound and its relation to aural cultural, acoustic environments, psychophysical and cultural perspectives, and, the issues involved for developing research for enacting change within an acoustic environment. 

A soundscape is “an environment of sound (or sonic environment) with emphasis on the way it is perceived and understood by the individual, or by a society. It thus depends on the relationship between the individual and any such environment. The term may refer to actual environments, or to abstract constructions such as musical compositions and [electroacoustic] montages, particularly when considered as an artificial [or virtual] environment.” 1 This course is divided into two main sections. The first section provides learning opportunities to understand the core principles of soundscape studies. The second will apply these principles to enacting some change on an actual acoustic environment, and use the results of subjective listener tests and objective measurement to understand real-world issues.

Students completing this course will have a broad understanding of sound, aural cultural and acoustic environments from physical, psychophysical and cultural perspectives, and the issues involved to develop research and/or bring about change within an acoustic environment.

1. Handbook for Acoustic Ecology, refer http://www2.sfu.ca/sonic-studio/handbook/Soundscape.html.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

None


Undergraduate Students

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Apply your listening skills for identifying and analysing the principal components of a soundscape,
  • Apply basic knowledge for assessing a soundscape in relation to listener needs,
  • Integrate a range of electroacoustic and acoustic measurement technologies, with subjective listener assessment for soundscape exploration,
  • Communicate ideas and findings about a soundscape using aural, oral and visual methods,
  • Apply basic sound-design skills for designing a project to enact change in a soundscape.

 
Postgraduate Students

Upon successful completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Apply your listening skills for identifying and analysing the principal components of a soundscape,
  • Critically assess a soundscape in relation to listener needs,
  • Integrate a range of electroacoustic and acoustic measurement technologies, with subjective listener assessment for soundscape research,
  • Critically discuss and present design ideas and findings about a soundscape using aural, oral and visual methods,
  • Research, construct and implement a sound-design project to enact change in a soundscape.

 

 


Overview of Learning Activities

This course is taught through the following learning activities; lectures, class demonstrations, listening exercises, soundwalks, field recording activities and site visits.


Overview of Learning Resources

RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems. There will also be an accompanying listening or repertoire list. Course readings and repertoire examples (on CD audio) will be made available for you as well as held on reserve in the library.

The Library has produced a number of subject guides that includes quality online and print resources for your studies. The Library provides guides on academic referencing http://www.rmit.edu.au/library/referencing and subject specialist help via your Liaison Librarians.


Overview of Assessment

 

You will be assessed on how well you meet the course’s learning outcomes.

 

Assessment is through written and diagrammatic work pertaining to listening and soundwalk activities, class presentations, site visits, and sound based project work.

 

If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.

Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions which are available for review online: http://www.rmit.edu.au/students/assessment