Course Title: Marine and Geological Systems (MAGS)

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Marine and Geological Systems (MAGS)

Credit Points: 12.00


Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

EASC1082

City Campus

Undergraduate

120H Civil, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2010,
Sem 1 2013,
Sem 1 2014,
Sem 1 2015,
Spring2017

EASC1083

City Campus

Postgraduate

120H Civil, Environmental & Chemical Engineering

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2016

Course Coordinator: Prof John Buckeridge

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 2009

Course Coordinator Email: john.buckeridge@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 10.11.12


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

For undergraduate students: An interest in marine systems and geological processes is essential. Science/technological background recommended

For postgraduate students: An interest in marine systems and geological processes is essential. A pass in Marine and Geological Systems EASC1082 would be beneficial.


Course Description

For undergraduate students: This full-time, full-immersion, field-based course will review and build upon the fundamentals of Geology and Sedimentary Processes. You will make field observations, primarily in coastal exposures, which will be expanded later to develop a dynamic, conceptual framework.  You will develop an appreciation of deep geological time in marine environments.

The course begins by analysing living systems, then works back, through soft sediments, looking at pre-European conditions, and finally to rock and fossil analysis. The course evaluates changes in these systems due to climatic and environmental drivers and human intervention.

The course follows the principles of uniformitarianism: that the present is the key to the past, with the reverse also being true and is an ideal course to take as a University student  elective for environmentally minded undergraduate students. 

Note: There will be a $300.00 charge to cover food and accommodation at the field station.

For postgraduate students: This full-time, full-immersion, field-based course will review and build upon the fundamentals of Geology and Sedimentary, Igneous and Metamorphic Processes. You will make field observations, primarily in coastal exposures, which will be expanded later to develop a dynamic, conceptual framework.  You will develop an appreciation of deep geological time in marine environmental systems, intrusive igneous systems and contact metamorphism.

The course builds on an appreciation of present-day natural systems, then works back, through diagenesis, igneous and metamorphic processes and finally to rock analysis. The course evaluates changes in these systems due to both environmental drivers and human intervention. Students will undertake lithologic analyses sufficient to determine correlation of lithotypes over a broad region.

The course follows the principles of uniformitarianism: that the present is the key to the past, with the reverse also being true. This is an ideal course to take as an option for environmentally minded students. 

Note: There will be a $300.00 charge to cover food and accommodation at the field station.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

For undergraduate students: This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for BH080 Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours):

1.1     Comprehensive, theory based understanding of the underpinning natural and physical sciences and the engineering fundamentals applicable to the engineering discipline.

1.3     In-depth understanding of specialist bodies of knowledge within the engineering discipline

2.4     Application of systematic approaches to the conduct and management of engineering projects

3.1  Ethical conduct and professional accountability

3.2  Effective oral and written communication in professional and lay domains

 

This course also contributes to Program Learning Outcomes for BP096 Bachelor of Environmental Science/ Bachelor of Engineering (Environmental Engineering) (Honours)

1.1 You will be able to demonstrate a coherent understanding of environmental science by articulating the methods of science and explaining why current environmental knowledge is both contestable and testable through further inquiry

1.2. You will be able demonstrate a coherent understanding of environmental science by explaining the role and relevance of environmental science in society

2.1. You will exhibit depth and breadth of environmental science knowledge by demonstrating a broad and coherent knowledge and understanding of Earth system processes, especially in the hydrosphere, ecosphere, atmosphere and lithosphere, and a depth in the underlying principles and concepts in Environmental Chemistry and/or Environmental Biology

2.2. You will be able to exhibit an understanding of the depth and breadth of environmental science knowledge by demonstrating knowledge that environmental science has interdisciplinary connections with other sciences.

3.4You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in environmental science by collecting, accurately recording, interpreting, and drawing conclusions from scientific data

4.1. You will be an effective communicator of environmental sciences by effectively communicating environmental results, information, or arguments using a range of modes (oral, written, visual) for a variety of purposes and audiences

5.2. You will be accountable for your  individual learning and scientific work in environmental science by working effectively, responsibly, ethically, and safely in an individual or team context

 

For postgraduate students: This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for MC191 Master of Environmental Science & Technology:

PLO 1.2: knowledge of the research principles and methods applicable to studying the chemical, biological and physical processes occurring in the environment

PLO 2.1: cognitive skills which demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge about environmental processes enabling critical reflection on environmental theory and professional practice or scholarship

PLO 2.2: cognitive, technical and creative skills enabling you to investigate analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories about the environment, and to apply established theories to different areas of knowledge or practice concerning the environment

PLO 2.3: cognitive, technical and creative skills to enable you to generate and evaluate complex ideas about the environmental processes and concepts at an abstract level

PLO 2.4: communication and research skills to enable you to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences

PLO 2.5: technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to environmental professional practice and scholarship

PLO 3.1: with creativity and initiative to new situations in your role as an environmental professional practitioner and/or in your further studies

PLO 3.2: with high level personal autonomy and accountability

PLO 3.3: with due regard to ethical conduct, the law and the safety of yourself and others around you 

PLO 3.4: to plan and execute a substantial environmental research based project. 

 

This course contributes to the Program Learning Outcomes for MC240 Master of Sustainable Practice:

K2 :  Knowledge of research principles and methods

PLO 2.1: cognitive skills which demonstrate mastery of theoretical knowledge about environmental processes enabling critical reflection on environmental theory and professional practice or scholarship

PLO 2.2: cognitive, technical and creative skills enabling you to investigate analyse and synthesise complex information, problems, concepts and theories about the environment, and to apply established theories to different areas of knowledge or practice concerning the environment

PLO 2.3: cognitive, technical and creative skills to enable you to generate and evaluate complex ideas about the environmental processes and concepts at an abstract level

PLO 2.4: communication and research skills to enable you to justify and interpret theoretical propositions, methodologies, conclusions and professional decisions to specialist and non-specialist audiences

PLO 2.5: technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to environmental professional practice and scholarship

PLO 3.1: with creativity and initiative to new situations in your role as an environmental professional practitioner and/or in your further studies

PLO 3.2: with high level personal autonomy and accountability

PLO 3.3: with due regard to ethical conduct, the law and the safety of yourself and others around you 

 PLO 3.4: to plan and execute a substantial environmental research based project. 

 

This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for MC254 Master of Engineering (Environmental Engineering):

  • Identify and assess risks (including OH&S) as well as the economic, social and environmental impacts of engineering activities
  • Develop creative and innovative solutions to engineering problems
  • Apply underpinning natural, physical and engineering sciences, mathematics, statistics, computer and information sciences.
  • Demonstrate effective team membership and team leadership
  • Communicate in a variety of different ways to collaborate with other people, including accurate listening, reading and comprehension, based on dialogue when appropriate, taking into account the knowledge, expectations, requirements, interests, terminology and language of the intended audience
  • Display a personal sense of responsibility for your work
  • Demonstrate orderly management of self, and professional conduct.
  • Plan and execute a substantial research-based project, with creativity and initiative in new situations in professional practice and with a high level of personal autonomy and accountability
  • Acknowledge (clearly) your own contributions and the contributions from others and distinguish contributions you may have made as a result of discussions or collaboration with other people


For undergraduate students: On completion of the course, you should be able to:

  1. Undertake a preliminary desk-based study on the relevant local geology and present this in an online essay
  2. Review selected geological literature from journal articles, reports and textbooks
  3. Identify and describe faunal assemblage and sedimentary structures and synthesize palaeoenvironments
  4. Obtain representative samples from the field for palaeoenvironmental analysis and to model possible future environmental change
  5. Effectively communicate findings both as a written geological report and as an audiovisual presentation (e.g. PowerPoint)
  6. Demonstrate adherence to appropriate regulatory frameworks, work safely and ethical conduct

For postgraduate students: 

On successful completion of the course, you will be able to:

1. Interrogate and synthesise complex information, concepts and theories relating to the origin and deposition of sediments, their lithification, diagenesis, deformation, metamorphism and liquefaction (as magma).

2. Critique research methodology pertaining to use of geological literature (journal articles, reports and textbooks).

3. Critically reflect on how environmental systems have changed on Earth, in anticipation that an appreciation of such changes will better equip you to sustainably manage resources for future generations.

4. Apply relevant knowledge and skills in mapping, lithological correlation and interpreting landforms and palaeo-environments to model future environmental change.

5. Exhibit requisite communication skills to disseminate research findings appropriate to the intended audience and the medium of communication.

6. Adhere to appropriate regulatory frameworks, work safely and demonstrate ethical conduct.


Overview of Learning Activities

For undergraduate students: 

  • Undertake a preliminary desk-based study on the relevant local geology and present this in an online essay
  • Participate in guided field studies and laboratory work to develop practical skills. Your field notebook will be submitted and graded.
  • Develop interpretative skills from observational evidence, facilitated by onsite guidance from demonstrators and evening tutorials and present findings in a field report.
  • Obtain effective science communication skills via oral presentation of your studies and findings for a range of potential audiences

Total study hours: This is a field-based course that involves a one-day local field excursion and a 4 day field-based trip away from Melbourne. It will be complemented by a tutorial, and where necessary, laboratory work at the city campus. In addition you can expect to spend a minimum of 30 hours in independent study.

For postgraduate students: 

-  Undertake a preliminary desk-based study on the relevant local geology and present this in an online essay

-  Participate in guided field studies and laboratory work to develop practical skills. Your field notebook will be submitted and graded.

-  Develop interpretative skills from observational evidence, facilitated by onsite guidance from demonstrators and evening tutorials and present findings in a field report.

- Obtain effective science communication skills via oral presentation of your studies and findings for a range of potential audiences

Total study hours: This is a field-based course that involves a one-day local field excursion and a 4-5 day field-based trip away from Melbourne. It will be complemented by two tutorials, and where necessary, laboratory work at the city campus. In addition you can expect to spend a minimum of 30 hours in independent study.

 


Overview of Learning Resources

For undergraduate students: 

Current research literature, laboratory manuals and bespoke resources will be used as required and as appropriate to the field area(s). Lecture materials and field notes for the localities visited will be provided, along with collection of rocks, minerals, living biota and fossils.

RMIT Library can provide appropriate Subject Guides.

For postgraduate students:

Current research literature, laboratory manuals and bespoke resources will be used as required and as appropriate to the field area(s). Lecture materials and field notes for the localities visited will be provided, along with collection of rocks, minerals, living biota and fossils.

Support can also be found at RMIT Library Guides: http://rmit.libguides.com/environmental-engineering


Overview of Assessment

☒This course has no hurdle requirements.

Assessment 1:

Written assignment, based on e-learning, prior to field course (10%)

(CLO 1)  

Assessment 2:

Field Notes (20%)

(CLO 3 & 4)

Assessment 3:  

Field report based on field notes and interpretations (50%)

(CLO 2-6)

Assessment 3:

Oral presentation:Findings and Discussion (20%)

(CLO 5)

Note: Postgraduates are expected to demonstrate advanced conceptual knowledge and application in written responses as specified in assessment rubrics