Course Title: Promote functional movement capacity

Part B: Course Detail

Teaching Period: Term2 2016

Course Code: SPRT5108C

Course Title: Promote functional movement capacity

School: 155T Vocational Health and Sciences

Campus: City Campus

Program: C5357 - Diploma of Remedial Massage

Course Contact: Joshua Davies

Course Contact Phone: +61 3 9925 4333

Course Contact Email: joshua.davies@rmit.edu.au


Name and Contact Details of All Other Relevant Staff

Rob Orr

robert.orr@rmit.edu.au

Nominal Hours: 30

Regardless of the mode of delivery, represent a guide to the relative teaching time and student effort required to successfully achieve a particular competency/module. This may include not only scheduled classes or workplace visits but also the amount of effort required to undertake, evaluate and complete all assessment requirements, including any non-classroom activities.

Pre-requisites and Co-requisites

This unit is co-delivered with the following:

  • HLTMSG003/SPRT5102C Perform remedial massage musculoskeletal assessments and
  • HLTMSG005/SPRT5104C Provide remedial massage treatments

Course Description

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to assess client movement and exercise capacity and develop an appropriate exercise program. It requires the use of functional movement knowledge in day-to-day professional practice to encourage healthy posture, effective movement patterns and safe exercise technique for clients.

No occupational licensing, certification or specific legislative requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.


National Codes, Titles, Elements and Performance Criteria

National Element Code & Title:

SISFFIT018 Promote functional movement capacity

Element:

1. Consolidate understanding of functional movement.

Performance Criteria:

1.1 Source and access information on functional movement relevant to fitness outcomes in line with accepted movement and exercise technique standards.

1.2 Use knowledge of functional movement in day-to-day professional practice.

1.3 Discuss/explain how understanding of functional movement contributes to safe/optimum technique and skill development.

1.4 Use a wide range of functional movement terminology relevant to injury prevention and fitness outcomes.

Element:

2. Inform clients of importance of functional movement.

Performance Criteria:

2.1 Review pre-exercise health screening, risk stratification, and health assessment procedures as required.

2.2 Discuss client health-related goals and acquire additional client information as required.

2.3 Refer client to a medical or allied health professional as required.

2.4 Discuss importance of identifying postural variances and explain relationship between posture and injury prevention to clients.

2.5 Provide information about common causes of poor posture and movement capacity to client.

2.6 Inform clients of legal and ethical limitations of a personal trainer.

Element:

3. Recognise and analyse client functional movement.

Performance Criteria:

3.1 Provide clear and accurate instruction and demonstration during relevant movements and exercises.

3.2 Explain the importance of functional movement and correct technique and dynamic posture during exercise.

3.3 Observe functional movement, range of movement and exercise capacity to identify any joint mobility or movement restrictions.

3.4 Observe strength and muscle activation outputs to identify any muscle activation concerns and/or strength limitation or imbalance.

3.5 Observe and record any client balance, stability or coordination limitations.

3.6 Monitor participation and performance to identify ineffective movement patterns and exercise technique.

3.7 Determine need for further evaluation and seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.

3.8 Document observations and discuss with client.

Element:

4. Consider static posture.

Performance Criteria:

4.1 Apply understanding of postural mechanisms and symptoms of poor posture to client observation and consultation.

4.2 Observe client static posture and identify issues that may be relevant in a dynamic setting.

4.3 Identify and document joints, muscles and connective tissues that would benefit from functional exercise strategies.

4.4 Seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.

Element:

5. Implement functional exercise strategies.

Performance Criteria:

5.1 Develop strategies to promote functional movement, exercise performance and reduce likelihood of injury.

5.2 Advise client of exercises or activities that are contraindicated or may further exacerbate any postural variance.

5.3 Modify client exercise technique and dynamic posture as required.

5.4 Seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.


Learning Outcomes



Details of Learning Activities

 

All class learning materials, notes and other key learning resources can be accessed via myRMIT

at www.rmit.edu.au/learninghub.

A combination of activities will support student’s learning in this course, such as:

• Face-to-face &/or online lectures to cover theoretical and practical concepts for each topic in

the course

• Students will learn to apply their skills and knowledge to work integrated learning (WIL) in the

student & clinical practice environment, during simulations and classroom based learning

• Work experience &/or placements observation of performance in the workplace will be a

valuable part of your learning experience

• Tutorial activities (individually and in teams) to discuss, debate, critique and consolidate your

ideas and extend your understanding around key concepts within specific topics

• Online discussions and activities to support and collaborate with other students in your course

and debate and discuss ideas

• Utilise and develop critical research and cognitive skills to find credible sources of health

information

• Self-directed study time (eg. readings or activities around theory) to enhance and strengthen

your knowledge and understanding of theoretical concepts

• To further facilitate learning students are strongly encouraged to use a range of communication

tools between themselves and their course instructor as well as between themselves and fellow

students by using the online learning platform

• It is strongly recommended that students partner up with fellow students in order to practice

assessment, treatment and palpation techniques


Teaching Schedule

 

Date

Topic

Week 37

Introduction to PFMC

Introduction to The Anatomy Trains

Upper Cross Syndrome – Cervical & Thoracic

Week 38

Upper Cross Syndrome – Cervical & Thoracic

Week 39

Upper Cross Syndrome – Thoracic Scapulae & GHJ

Week 40

No Class

Grand final day

Week 41

Upper Cross Syndrome – Thoracic Scapulae & GHJ

 

Week 42

Lower Cross Syndrome – Anterior Rotation of the Pelvis

Week 43

Lower Cross Syndrome – Anterior Rotation of the Pelvis

Week 44

Lower Cross Syndrome – Anterior Rotation of the Pelvis

Week 45

Patellofemoral Dysfuntion leading to Patella Tracking Syndrome (PTS)

Achillies Tendinopathy

Week 46

Assessment


Learning Resources

Prescribed Texts


References


Other Resources


Overview of Assessment

This unit is part of an integrated program.

You must demonstrate Performance and Knowledge Evidence of the unit in order to be deemed competent.

Assessment methods have been designed to measure achievement of each competency in a flexible manner over a range of assessment tasks.

You may be assessed by:

• Oral or written questioning

• Oral presentations

• Assignments and projects

• Direct observation of actual work practice

• Presentation of a portfolio of evidence which may comprise documents, and/or photographs and/or video and/or audio files

• Work-based activities

• Third-party feedback from a work supervisor/employer

Primary assessment involves on-going practical and applied assessment in a clinical workplace or simulated environment such as a supervised student clinic or at a Work Integrated Learning (WIL) placement activity.

Competency based training requires you to be in attendance in order for assessment to be undertaken.

Feedback will be provided throughout the semester in class and/or online discussions, through individual and group feedback on practical exercises and by individual consultation.

All Assessment tasks should be performed or submitted by their due dates.

If due to illness or other unforeseen circumstance, you are unable to attend on the due date of an assessment (e.g. test, examination, oral, etc.) OR you do attend, but your performance has been affected, you may submit an APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL CONSIDERATION within 2 working days of the due date. If Special Consideration is granted, you will be given the opportunity to complete/repeat the assessment task at a later date. For advice on this application please visit www.rmit.edu.au/students/specialconsideration  or speak to your Program Coordinator.

If due to illness or other unforeseen circumstance, you are unable to submit by the due date  (e.g. assignment, report, project etc.):

·         you may submit an APPLICATION FOR EXTENSION OF TIME FOR SUBMISSION OF ASSESSABLE WORK for an extension of time of up to seven (7) calendar days or less. This must be lodged with the Program Coordinator 1 working day before the original due date. If granted, you will have the opportunity to submit up to 7 days later than the original due date. For advice on this application please visit www.rmit.edu.au/students/assessment/extension  or speak to your Program Coordinator.

Or:

·         you may submit an APPLICATION FOR SPECIAL CONSIDERATION within 2 working days of the due date. If Special Consideration is granted, you will be given the opportunity to submit the assessment task more than 7 days after the original due date. For advice on this application please visit www.rmit.edu.au/students/specialconsideration  or speak to your Program Coordinator.

You are expected to prepare all assignments and other written work in a professional manner. More information on general academic study and writing skills can be found on the “Learning Lab” http://emedia.rmit.edu.au/learninglab/. All work submitted for assessment must be submitted electronically unless otherwise advised.​

Students must keep a copy of all submitted assessments including electronic copies.

Harvard style is used for all referencing and for bibliography.

RMIT University has a strict policy on academic integrity and plagiarism and. Please refer to the website for more information on this policy. www.rmit.edu.au/students/academic-integrity

If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the program coordinator or the Disability Liaison Unit if you would like to find out more.
This unit
Your rights and responsibilities as a student can be found at http://www1.rmit.edu.au/students/rights-and-responsibilities 

This course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies and procedures which are described and referenced at www.rmit.edu.au/students/assessment

Credit transfer and RPL

Credit transfer is available to students who have already completed the same or similar courses. Recognition of prior learning is available to students who have relevant prior skills or experience. Please refer to http://www.rmit.edu.au/browse;ID=8u7jborsx9dy

 
Assessment Tasks

 1. Quizzes

 2. Skills Checklist. 

The tasks to be assessed within this unit replicate the necessary skills and knowledge required to promote functional movement capacity within the industry.

 Assessment Matrix

The assessment mapping demonstrates alignment of assessment tasks with the relevant unit of competency and with the performance evidence, knowledge evidence and assessment conditions for each unit.

ASSESSMENT METHODS/TYPES OF EVIDENCE:

 

Interview/ Verbal Questioning

Self-Reflections

Assignment/ Project

Case Study or Role Play

Third Party Verification

Workplace Performance

Research or Report

Portfolio of Evidence

Written Tasks

 

  

NATIONAL UNIT CODE : SISFFIT018

NATIONAL UNIT NAME: Promote functional movement capacity

RMIT CODE: SPRT5108C

Cluster: HLTMSG003/SPRT5102C Perform remedial massage musculoskeletal assessments & HLTMSG005/SPRT5104C Provide remedial massage treatments

Elements

Performance Criteria

Related Assessment Tasks

Assessment Method/

Types of Evidence  

1.       Consolidate understanding of functional movement.

1.1    Source and access information on functional movement relevant to fitness outcomes in line with accepted movement and exercise technique standards.

Skills Checklist

Workplace Performance

1.2    Use knowledge of functional movement in day-to-day professional practice.

Skills Checklist

Workplace Performance

1.3    Discuss/explain how understanding of functional movement contributes to safe/optimum technique and skill development.


Assessment Tasks

1. Clinic skills checklist.  Attached, To be completed in clinic prior to 11 November 2016. 

2. Practical assessment. Attached, all students will complete the practical assessment on the final class on 11/11/16.


Assessment Matrix

 

ASSESSMENT METHODS/TYPES OF EVIDENCE:

Interview/ Verbal Questioning

Self-Reflections

Assignment/ Project

Case Study or Role Play

Third Party Verification

Workplace Performance

Research or Report

Portfolio of Evidence

Written Tasks

A

B

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

 

UNIT CODE: SISFIT018   UNIT NAME: Promote Functional movement capacity

Cluster: None

Foundation Skills:      Yes   No

Elements

Performance Criteria

Related Assessment Tasks

Assessment Method See legend above

  1. Consolidate understanding of functional movement
  1. Source and access information on functional movement relevant to fitness outcomes in line with accepted movement and exercise technique standards.

Clinic observation skills checklist

E

  1. Use knowledge of functional movement in day-to-day professional practice.

Clinic observation skills checklist

E

  1. Discuss/explain how understanding of functional movement contributes to safe/optimum technique and skill development.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Use a wide range of functional movement terminology relevant to injury prevention and fitness outcomes.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Inform clients of importance of functional movement.
  1. Review pre-exercise health screening, risk stratification, and health assessment procedures as required

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Discuss client health-related goals and acquire additional client information as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Refer client to a medical or allied health professional as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Discuss importance of identifying postural variances and explain relationship between posture and injury prevention to clients.

Practical assessment 1

D

Practical assessment 1

D

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Recognise and analyse client functional movement.
  1. Provide clear and accurate instruction and demonstration during relevant movements and exercises.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Explain the importance of functional movement and correct technique and dynamic posture during exercise.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Observe functional movement, range of movement and exercise capacity to identify any joint mobility or movement restrictions.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Observe strength and muscle activation outputs to identify any muscle activation concerns and/or strength limitation or imbalance.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Observe and record any client balance, stability or coordination limitations.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Monitor participation and performance to identify ineffective movement patterns and exercise technique.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Determine need for further evaluation and seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Document observations and discuss with client.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Consider static posture.
  1. Apply understanding of postural mechanisms and symptoms of poor posture to client observation and consultation.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Observe client static posture and identify issues that may be relevant in a dynamic setting.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Identify and document joints, muscles and connective tissues that would benefit from functional exercise strategies.

Practical assessment 1

D

  1. Seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

5. Implement functional exercise strategies.

5.1 Develop strategies to promote functional movement, exercise performance and reduce likelihood of injury.

Practical assessment 1

D

 

Advise client of exercises or activities that are contraindicated or may further exacerbate any postural variance.

Practical assessment 1

D

 

Modify client exercise technique and dynamic posture as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

 

Seek guidance from an appropriate allied health professional as required.

Practical assessment 1

D

Performance Evidence

Evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit in the context of the job role. This must include period(s) totalling at least eight hours comprising at least five different client contact sessions, and:

  • observe and analyse functional movement capacity for at least five clients in line with accepted movement and technique standards incorporating the following for each client:
  • at least three functional movements
  • movement and exercise observation in the following movement patterns and scenarios:
  • push
  • pull
  • squat
  • lunge
  • rotate
  • overhead press
  • overhead pull
  • with and without equipment
  • loaded and unloaded
  • identification of joint mobility or movement restrictions against typical range of movement for major joint complexes, with consideration of:
  • joint movement
  • muscle action
  • passive range
  • active range
  • functional range
  • joint and muscle interactions
  • stability of major joint complexes, relevant to the client’s needs, level of risk and experience
  • balance and coordination, relevant to the client’s needs, level of risk and experience
  • a variety of functional movement measurement tools to support dynamic posture analysis:
  • flexometer
  • goniometer
  • plumb line
  • grid
  • plurimeter
  • pressure biofeedback unit
  • photographic technology
  • video analysis
  • tape measure
  • identify each client’s capacity to activate and achieve good muscle function in all of the following muscle groups, using at least three muscle activation exercises per client:
  • core abdominals
  • glutes
  • hamstrings
  • hip flexors
  • rotator cuff
  • chest
  • back
  
  
  

Practical assessment 1

&

Clinic Observation skills checklist

D & E

Knowledge Evidence

Demonstrated knowledge required to complete the tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit:

  • legislative obligations and organisational policies and procedures in relation to:
  • duty of care
  • work health and safety/occupational health and safety
  • confidentiality of client information
  • professional ethics
  • appropriate collection and storage of client information
  • the relationship between injury, injury prevention and the following postural variances:
  • structural and functional variances
  • kyphosis
  • rounded shoulders
  • winging of scapula
  • increased or decreased lordosis
  • excessive posterior or anterior pelvic tilt
  • scoliosis
  • genu varum or genu valgum
  • increased pronation of foot or ankle complex
  • increased supination of foot or ankle complex
  • hyperextension of knees
  • lateral tilt of pelvis or head
  • forward head posture
  • rotated patella
  • ideal postural alignment:
  • normal spinal curves
  • straight line running though:
  • ear lobe
  • anterior shoulder joint
  • vertebral bodies of L1-5
  • posterior hip joint
  • anterior knee joint
  • anterior ankle joint
  • transverse abdominus
  • pelvic floor muscles
  • relationship of poor posture and risk of injury and muscular deficits:
  • diminished muscle strength or endurance
  • increased muscle tension/tone
  • limited flexibility
  • limited function
  • postural influences affecting dysfunctional movement patterns and exercise technique
  • typical range of movement for major joint complexes
  • deviations in posture or functional limitations at commencement, during, at completion of exercise or movement:
  • asymmetrical muscle tone
  • spinal curvature – lordosis, kyphosis, scoliosis
  • scapula setting:
  • winging of scapula
  • anterior tipping/tilting
  • upward/downward rotation
  • pelvis position:
  • anterior/posterior
  • rotation
  • knee alignment:
  • varus/valgus
  • foot alignment:
  • internal/external rotation
  • pronation/supination
  • forward head
  • sitting/standing/supine
  • locomotive gait – walking, jogging, running
  • role of muscles in contractions:
  • agonist/prime mover
  • antagonist
  • fixator
  • assistor/synergist
  • causes of poor posture:
  • congenial abnormalities of the musculoskeletal system
  • poor muscle strength
  • poor muscle endurance
  • muscle imbalance
  • lack of mobility
  • damage to bony structures
  • damage to connective tissue including ligaments and cartilage
  • muscle activation, correct execution, and teaching points for primal functional movement patterns:
  • push
  • pull
  • squat
  • lunge
  • rotate
  • overhead press
  • overhead pull
  • role of muscle activation in functional movement and exercise performance:
  • muscle sensory reception
  • reciprocal inhibition
  • normal range of movement for major joint complexes
  • characteristics of balance and balance exercise:
  • base of support
  • centre of gravity
  • limits of stability
  • components of balance maintenance
  • variation of stance
  • variation of surfaces or equipment
  • balance disturbance
  • progression of balance exercises
  • characteristics of coordination and agility:
  • fine motor skills
  • gross motor skills
  • hand-eye skills
  • progression of coordination or agility exercises
  • changes to centre of gravity caused by:
  • pregnancy
  • overweight
  • inappropriate footwear
  • behaviours
  • work practices
  • sport or leisure activities
  • industry endorsed scope of practice for a personal trainer
  • industry endorsed pre-exercise screening and risk stratification protocols
  • role of medical or allied health professionals for referral or guidance
  • reasons for referral to an appropriate medical or allied health professional:
  • pain upon presentation to initial session/induction
  • history of uncontrolled/unresolved pain
  • abnormal/inconsistent pain patterns which may point towards a pathology
  • pain during movement or exercise
  • static postural deviations
  • an inability to correct static or dynamic posture
  • restricted joint range of movement, strength imbalance or balance, stability or coordination concern that is limiting function
  • a diagnosed muscle, bone or joint problem with medical or allied health advice that the problem could be made worse by participating in physical activity/exercise
  • identified through industry endorsed pre-exercise screening and risk stratification.
  
  

Practical assessment 1

&

Clinic Observation skills checklist

D & E

Skills must be demonstrated in:

  • a fitness industry workplace or simulated environment with clients with real or simulated health and fitness goals.

Assessment must ensure access to:

  • legislation and organisational policies and procedures in relation to functional movement observation and improvement
  • industry endorsed risk stratification procedures.

Assessment must ensure use of:

  • a variety of appropriate equipment to demonstrate and observe functional movement patterns, dynamic posture, joint range of movement, muscle activation and strength, balance, stability and coordination:
  • flexometer
  • goniometer
  • plumb line
  • grid
  • plurimeter
  • tape measure
  • client record forms
  • documented plans with inclusion of identified modifications/adjustments needed
  • photographic technology
  • video analysis
  • clients; these can be:
  • clients in an industry workplace, or
  • individuals who participate in role plays or simulated activities, set up for the purpose of assessment, in a simulated industry environment operated within a training organisation.

Assessment activities that allow the individual to:

  • observe multiple clients functional movement, identify issues and provide functional exercise strategies within the scope of practice.
  

Foundation Skills

  

Core Skills from the Australian Core Skills Framework (ACSF)

  • Reading
  
  • Writing
  
  • Oral Communication
  
  • Numeracy
  
  • Learning
  

Employability Skills from the Core Skills for Work Framework (CFW) – see below Table

  

Course Overview: Access Course Overview