Course Title: Indigenous Land Use (Voc Conf)

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Indigenous Land Use (Voc Conf)

Credit Points: 12

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

HUSO2066

City Campus

Postgraduate

365H Global, Urban and Social Studies

Face-to-Face

Sem 1 2007,
Sem 1 2009,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2019

Course Coordinator: Prof Libby Porter

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 3585

Course Coordinator Email: libby.porter@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 8.11

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

None


Course Description

All places on the continent now called Australia are Indigenous places. This means everyone in Australia is already in a relationship with Indigenous places, sovereignties and land-based knowledge systems, whether recognised or not. This course will help you understand historical and contemporary relationships between Indigenous peoples and place, and the responsibility of non-Indigenous society to that relationship. You will examine how the structure of settler-colonialism continually disrupts Indigenous relationships to place and the ways Indigenous peoples continuously assert their land-based sovereignties and practices in the face of that disruption. You will gain an understanding of contemporary legal and policy frameworks governing the relationship between Indigenous peoples and their lands including Native Title, Cultural Heritage and Indigenous Protected Areas. The course includes on Country learning with knowledge holders within Victoria to learn with traditional knowledge holders and land managers.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On completion of the course you will be able to:

  • Describe and analyse a variety of ways in which non-Indigenous Australians can encounter the beliefs and practices of Indigenous people and communities
  • Critically appreciate settler-colonialism, its impact on Indigenous land sovereignties and practices, and its role in contemporary policy
  • Outline a well-informed perspective on the Indigenous Australian concept of ‘caring for country’ and its implications for contemporary land policy
  • Critically examine strategies for working within existing legislative and policy frameworks to support Indigenous peoples’ place and land sovereignties and practices.


On completion of the course you will be able to:

  1. Describe and analyse a variety of ways in which non-Indigenous Australians can encounter the knowledge systems and land practices of Indigenous peoples
  2. Critically examine settler-colonialism, its impact on Indigenous land sovereignties and practices, and its role in contemporary policy
  3. Outline a well-informed perspective on the Indigenous Australian concept of ‘caring for country’ and its implications for contemporary land policy

Critically examine strategies for working within existing legislative and policy frameworks to support Indigenous peoples’ place and land sovereignties and practices


Overview of Learning Activities

You will be actively engaged in learning that involves a range of activities including lectures, workshops, guest presentations, field visits, group discussion, and group and individual research. Some additional costs may be required for field study activities.


Overview of Learning Resources

RMIT will provide you with resources and tools for learning in this course through our online systems.

A list of recommended learning resources will be provided by your lecturer, including books, journal articles and web resources. You will also be expected to seek further resources relevant to the focus of your own learning.

The University Library https://www.rmit.edu.au/library has extensive resources for students. The Library has produced a subject guide that includes quality online and print resources for your studies

The Library provides guides on academic referencing and subject specialist help.


Overview of Assessment

You will be assessed on the above learning outcomes. You will be assessed on how well you meet the course’s learning outcomes and on your development against the program learning outcomes. Feedback will be given on all assessment tasks.

Assessment Tasks:

  1. Critical reflection (20%) (individual task linked to CLO1)
  2. Conceptual analysis (40%) (individual task linked to CLO 2)
  3. Field study project (40%) (individual task linked to CLO 3 and 4)

If you have a long term medical condition and/or disability it may be possible to negotiate to vary aspects of the learning or assessment methods. You can contact the Program Manager or Equitable Learning Services if you would like to find out more.

Your course assessment conforms to RMIT assessment principles, regulations, policies, procedures and instructions.