Course Title: Functional Genomics and Proteomics

Part A: Course Overview

Course Title: Functional Genomics and Proteomics

Credit Points: 12.00

Terms

Course Code

Campus

Career

School

Learning Mode

Teaching Period(s)

BIOL2267

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2006,
Sem 2 2007,
Sem 2 2009,
Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012,
Sem 2 2013,
Sem 2 2014,
Sem 2 2015,
Sem 2 2016,
Spring2016

BIOL2267

Bundoora Campus

Undergraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017,
Sem 2 2018,
Sem 2 2019

BIOL2332

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

135H Applied Sciences

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2010,
Sem 2 2011,
Sem 2 2012

BIOL2332

Bundoora Campus

Postgraduate

171H School of Science

Face-to-Face

Sem 2 2017,
Sem 2 2018,
Sem 2 2019

Course Coordinator: Dr Hao Van

Course Coordinator Phone: +61 3 9925 7142

Course Coordinator Email: thithuhao.van@rmit.edu.au

Course Coordinator Location: 223-1-Bundoora campus

Course Coordinator Availability: By appointment


Pre-requisite Courses and Assumed Knowledge and Capabilities

BIOL2184 Gene Technologies or an equivalent course or knowledge in molecular biology. For further information, contact course coordinator.


Course Description

This course aims to provide you with the knowledge and practical skills associated with functional genomics and proteomics in prokaryotes and eukaryotes.  Particular emphasis is given to high throughput methods - a powerful tool in modern biology – for the analysis of gene structure and function. Students will also explore a variety of topics, including the responses of plants at the ‘whole-genome’ level to biotic and abiotic stresses, ecotoxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics and the implications of applying ’personalised medicine’ in human health. The environmental, economic and ethical aspects of this emerging technology will be examined and discussed.


Objectives/Learning Outcomes/Capability Development

On successful completion of this course you should be able to:

  1. Discuss the uses of functional genomics and proteomics in agriculture, ecotoxicology and human health
  2. Apply functional genomics techniques in the laboratory
  3. Work effectively in a research team
  4. Communicate your knowledge on functional genomics effectively
  5. Identify and discuss the techniques used in functional genomics such as microarrays, next generation sequencing technology, mRNA expression and miRNA expression; and
  6. Interpret data obtained through high throughput sequencing studies.

Postgraduate students should also be able to:

  1. Write an essay or review on use of functional genomics tools to study plant, animal or human diseases.

 


This course contributes to the following Program Learning Outcomes for

  • BH090 Bachelor of Engineering (Mechanical Engineering) (Honours)/Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology),
  • BH087 Bachelor of Engineering (Chemical Engineering) (Honours)/Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology), and
  • BP293 Bachelor of Science (Biotechnology)/Bachelor of Biomedical Science:

PLO1. Understanding science:

1.1. You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of biological sciences by articulating the methods of science and explaining why current biological knowledge is both contestable and testable through further inquiry

1.2. You will demonstrate a coherent understanding of biological sciences by explaining the role and relevance of biological sciences in society.

 

PLO2. Scientific knowledge:

2.1. You will exhibit depth and breadth of knowledge by demonstrating a well-developed understanding of biological sciences

2.2. You will exhibit depth and breadth of knowledge by demonstrating that biotechnology has interdisciplinary connections with other sciences.

 

PLO3. Inquiry and problem solving:

3.1. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by gathering, synthesizing and critically evaluating information from a range of sources

3.3. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by selecting and applying practical and/or theoretical techniques with technical competence in conducting field, laboratory-based or virtual experiments

3.4. You will be able to critically analyse and solve problems in biotechnology by collecting, accurately recording, interpreting and drawing conclusions from scientific data

 

PLO4. Communication:

4.1. You will be an effective communicator of biological sciences by effectively communicating scientific results, information, or arguments using a range of modes (oral, written, visual) for a variety of purposes and audiences

 

PLO5. Personal and professional responsibility:

5.1. You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work in biotechnology by being an independent and self-directed learner

5.2. You will be accountable for individual learning and scientific work by working effectively, responsibly, ethically, and safely in an individual or team context.


Overview of Learning Activities

Learning activities included in this course are:

  • Lectures where syllabus material will be presented and explained, and the subject will be illustrated with demonstrations and examples
  • Online tests and laboratory projects designed to give further practice in the application of theory and procedures, and to give feedback on student progress and understanding;
  • Written assignments consisting of numerical and other problems requiring an integrated understanding of the subject matter

Total study hours

In a total of 120 study hours, you should undertake 50 teacher-guided hours.

In addition, you are expected to spend a minimum of 70 self-directed hours doing independent study, including online work.


Overview of Learning Resources

There is no prescribed text. The resources for this course are:

  • Relevant texts, library resources and freely accessible internet sites
  • Learning material provided in class
  • Course information, lecture notes and recorded lectures on the course web site
  • References for each lecture are noted on the last slide of the lecture notes or embedded within the relevant lecture slide (in the notes).


Overview of Assessment

Note that:

This course has no hurdle requirements.

Please note: Your learning from the Practicals is assessed directly in Assessment Task 2. Additionally, the knowledge, skills and experience you gain during Practical sessions should benefit you for Assessment Tasks 1, 3, and 4.

 

Assessment tasks are as follows.

 

A: Undergraduate:

 

  1. On-line Quizzes

The quizzes are based on weekly lectures.

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLOs 1 & 5.

 

  1. Practical Reports

Please note that in your practical reports, you are expected to analyse and discuss data that you collect yourself during practicals. Hence you are expected to fully participate in practical sessions.

Weighting: 30%

This assessment supports CLOs 2, 3, 4, & 6.

 

  1. Mid-Semester Test

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLOs 1 & 5. 

 

  1. Examination

A final examination is based on all topics covered in the course.

Weighting: 50%

This assessment supports CLO 1, 4, 5, 6.

B: Postgraduate

 

  1. Online Quizzes

The quizzes are based on the weekly lectures.

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLOs 1 & 5.

 

  1. Practical Reports

Weighting: 20%

This assessment supports CLOs 2, 3, 4, & 6.

 

  1. Mid-Semester Test

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLOs 1 & 5. 

 

  1. Final Examination

A final Exam is based on all topics covered in the course.

Weighting: 50%

This assessment supports CLO 1, 4, 5, & 6.

 

  1. Review Paper or Research grant proposal

A written review or essay on a topic mutually agreed by course coordinator.

Weighting: 10%

This assessment supports CLO 1, 4, 5, 6, & 7.